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Lifestyle changes

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Forum Name: TNBC Polls & Surveys
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URL: http://forum.tnbcfoundation.org/forum_posts.asp?TID=9493
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Topic: Lifestyle changes
Posted By: Lee21
Subject: Lifestyle changes
Date Posted: Jan 14 2012 at 10:17pm
Hi,
I am wondering how many of us diagnosed with TNBC made lifestyle changes: diet, exercise, relaxation.  There does seem to be some indication that such changes may be associated with better survival but I'm not sure if necessarily through lowering the risk for breast cancer recurrence. 

If you will, please indicate if you made changes in
a) diet (I'm particularly interested in soy consumption since there seems to be some concern about soy's estrogenic effects)
b) alcohol consumption
c) exercise level
d) added relaxation techniques

And, if you have, what do you think helped you at least your sense of well being?

Were you able to keep up the changes during chemo?

For myself, upon being diagnosed I changed to eating fish and vegetables/fruits only, omitting meat, animal (except for fish) and diary products.  I haven't touched alcohol since (I used to have a glass of wine each day).  I have been taking brisk walks for 30 minutes each day and am contemplating adding yoga.  I am concerned about my ability to keep up with these changes during treatment.

Lee


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12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm



Replies:
Posted By: cheeks
Date Posted: Jan 15 2012 at 2:09am
Originally posted by Lee21 Lee21 wrote:

Hi,
I am wondering how many of us diagnosed with TNBC made lifestyle changes: diet, exercise, relaxation.  There does seem to be some indication that such changes may be associated with better survival but I'm not sure if necessarily through lowering the risk for breast cancer recurrence. 

If you will, please indicate if you made changes in
a) diet (I'm particularly interested in soy consumption since there seems to be some concern about soy's estrogenic effects)
b) alcohol consumption
c) exercise level
d) added relaxation techniques

And, if you have, what do you think helped you at least your sense of well being?

Were you able to keep up the changes during chemo?

For myself, upon being diagnosed I changed to eating fish and vegetables/fruits only, omitting meat, animal (except for fish) and diary products.  I haven't touched alcohol since (I used to have a glass of wine each day).  I have been taking brisk walks for 30 minutes each day and am contemplating adding yoga.  I am concerned about my ability to keep up with these changes during treatment.

Lee

Lee, 

It's nice to meet you and I am sure you will receive quite a few responses to your questions. They are good questions to ask. I can only speak for myself and that I am still working on making changes. 

 My oncologist gave me some guidelines for diet which i tried my best to follow: (i also have type 2 diabetes, cholesterol and triglyceride problems and have been overweight for quite a few years - plus just post-menopausal at the time)

1) No soy products
2) Only cooked fruits and vegetables (not raw) reasoning was to be cautious of things that might cause stomach upset etc.
3) She added Vitamin D3 to my daily meds as my level was low which i know is fairly common with TN

I am sure there were other things suggested that i don't even remember now. 

I have never been much of a drinker but to tell you the truth after each chemo my husband and I would go out to eat and i would usually have a small drink as long as i was feeling okay. (I don't remember if she addressed alcohol consumption but after being there for 5-6 hours i wanted to have one) 

I walked more than usual and a lot of it was out of "nervous energy" - following my mastectomy and through most of chemo I did circles around the neighborhood and probably walked about 5 miles each day according to my husband - think i wore him and one of my sisters out LOL 

There were many nights i only slept a few hours and then might take a nap during the day. I did have and do have some relaxation CD's i listen to - i think whatever you can find for relaxation - stress relief is a good thing. 

This site is a wonderful, warm, caring and informative place to come. The people here are more than willing to listen, answer and assist you and each other through this journey - they certainly have been so with me...Wacko

I am still a "work in progress" and more than one person has reminded me to be kind and gentle with myself. 

Blair






-------------
Lump found 11/08
DX: 2/09 @52 TNBC
L. Mast. 3/26/09, SN-, BRCA-,
4.5 cm (post surgical)T2NOMO
Chemo: 4/09-10/09 Taxol x 12,
A/C x 4, No rad.No recon. NED 1/17. New Primary right breast TN, 2/2018.


Posted By: Charlene
Date Posted: Jan 15 2012 at 7:58am
Hi, Lee,
 
I get more exercise--treadmill and walking the dog minimum of 4 hours per week
Less alcohol, although I still enjoy a beer and/or glass of wine on weekends.  (My oncologist says all things in moderation.)
I take Vitamin D3.
More fruits and vegetables, less fat, but I am not a vegetarian by any stretch.
Mentally--I remind myself to enjoy every day, to give thanks for every day.  I don't take the little things for granted any more--I appreciate them.
Wishing you the best,
Charlene


-------------
DX 3/10 @59 ILC/TNBC
Stage 1, Grade 2, Multifocal; Lumpectomy/re-excision
SNB 0/4 nodes, BRCA-; Taxotere/Cytoxan X4, 30 rads
3/14:NED


Posted By: 123Donna
Date Posted: Jan 15 2012 at 11:32am
Lee,

If you can, I think it is very helpful if you can get some exercise in during chemo, especially walking.  For me going through mastectomy then chemo the first time, I didn't have much energy and didn't exercise much at all.  Just walking up the stairs or to the mailbox was about all I could handle some days.  That's OK, just do whatever your body can handle.  After chemo, I started exercising and working out with weight machines to get my strength back.  Then I had a recurrence and had to go through chemo again and then radiation.  Both zapped my strength terribly while trying to work during treatment.  I allowed myself to only concentrate on what I could actively handle and not worry about what I couldn't do.  Since finishing treatment I haven't exercised like I would like to.  The fatigue is still there.  When the weather is nice, I take long walks with my dog on the weekends.  I've signed up for a Yoga class that I hope to start soon.

As far as diet goes, I ate pretty healthy before breast cancer.  I used to drink wine more often, but now just have an occasional glass or two.  I didn't drink during chemo, just never felt like it.  We switched to only organic dairy products like milk and yogurt.  I added more Omega 3's to my diet and Vitamin D3 (please see the thread on Vitamin D3 as most of us with TNBC are deficient in Vitamin D).

I'm going to a mediation technique class at our Cancer Support Community to learn more about mediation.  I bought audiotape by Pema Chodron's.  Basically I've changed my philosophy from trying to get everything done on my list each day and feeling like I have to be in control of all aspects of my life, to I do what I can and not worry about the rest.  My motto is "baby steps".  I don't sweat the stuff that I can't do or don't achieve.  I pat myself on the back on what I can.  I realize I no longer have control in my life and that's OK, I'll work with what I can control.  Cancer has given me the ability to see that my life won't be about my plans, but about what happens.  I have to adjust the new me to best handle the life I now have.  I try to appreciate each day and not to expect anymore than what I have now.

Donna


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DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15



Posted By: susanb
Date Posted: Jan 15 2012 at 11:44am
My oncologist says that us 3N gals don't have to worry about soy. Also BC rates for Japanese women (who eat a lot of soy) are almost non existent.

A low fat (30 grams a day or less) has been proven to be effective in lowering recurrence rates for 3N BC, so I try very hard to stick to it. I am mostly vegetarian, with some of the "good fat" fish occasionally. I exercise regularly. I used to practice yoga and mean to get back to it.

I try to eat as clean as I can. I grow a lot of my own vegetables organically in my front yard. I rarely drink wine or beer and no hard booze at all. I am in the process of giving up milk products. I am trying to eat more raw and only lightly cooked veggies. I don't fry anything.

I try to avoid all chemical exposure and use only non metallic deodorant and non chemical toothpaste. I have been NED for over 5 years.


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Dx June 06 stage 1 at age 46, no nodes, clean margins, Ki-67 at 54, Bilateral Mastectomy, 4 rounds AC, complete hysterectomy Aug O7. Mother and Grandmother both died of breast cancer dx in their 30's.


Posted By: christina1961
Date Posted: Jan 15 2012 at 3:03pm
I haven't eaten any meats except fish and shellfish for the past several years.  I eat quite a bit of vegetables and fruit. I walked quite a bit during my first chemo, but as all of this has dragged on I have exercised less and less.  I plan to change that in a few weeks when I get finished with this chemo.  I used to exercise vigorously 4-5 days a week for many, many years but started slacking off five years ago. I have cut back on sugar but haven't cut it out yet.  I don't drink or smoke and haven't for over 25 years.

-------------
2.5 cm TNBC, BRCA-, diag. 2/11, neoadj chemotherapy, uni MX, y2cm,2/16 nodes, RCBII, tumor retested 5-10%ER+,PR-,Her2-, rads, clin trial eribulin 10/11-2/12, tamox.


Posted By: Lee21
Date Posted: Jan 15 2012 at 3:45pm
For those of you who have responded, thank you.  Hope we hear from more of the others. 

I think lifestyle changes give us back some of the control that has been yanked from us overnight. One can abuse one's body for years and never get cancer, others who do everything right, nevertheless get cancer and it's never clear why. With a statistic such as 1 in 8 women getting breast cancer sometime during her lifetime, it would seem that there has to be environmental contributions.


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12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm


Posted By: ds21
Date Posted: Jan 16 2012 at 12:01am
The University of Connecticut recently disciplined a prominent scientist studying the health effects of red wine for faking data http://the-scientist.com/2012/01/13/wine-researcher-caught-faking/ - http://the-scientist.com/2012/01/13/wine-researcher-caught-faking/

It is really unfortunate to see scientific fraud like this, but particularly in an area where life style change could be beneficial for so many people.   Biochemical studies aside, there is an extensive body of epidemiology showing that alcohol consumption, whether red wine or some other form, is associated with increased risk for breast cancer http://jama.ama-assn.org/content/286/17/2143.short - http://jama.ama-assn.org/content/286/17/2143.short

David


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Co-survivor


Posted By: 123Donna
Date Posted: Jan 16 2012 at 12:12am
< ="text/" ="" ="/B1D671CF-E532-4481-99AA-19F420D90332etdefender/huidhui.js?0=0&0=0&0=0">

Alcohol safe for triple-negative patients?

    Marc: I have read that alcoholic beverages are worse for estrogen-receptor-positive patients than estrogen-receptor-negative patients. Is this true? How much alcohol can triple-negative breast cancer patients safely consume?
Answer —Beth DuPree, M.D., F.A.C.S.:

Alcohol has been listed as a carcinogen and can have significantly negative effects on women who consume too much alcohol. Alcohol has its greatest effects in inhibiting the liver's ability to clear certain substances from the body. The studies have shown that postmenopausal women, who by virtue of being postmenopausal have a higher incidence of estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancers, are at greatest risk for consuming excess amounts of alcohol. Women who consume 1/2 glass of wine per day in the postmenopausal period increase their risk of developing a breast cancer by 6%. Women who consume 2-3 glasses of alcohol per day increase their risk of developing breast cancer by close to 40%. There is definitely a direct relationship between the amount of alcohol consumed and the increased risk of breast cancer. In the estrogen-receptor-negative patients, there has not been such a direct correlation but looking at the overall detrimental effects of excess alcohol consumption, this is one lifestyle modification that can benefit women in multiple ways. I have been asked by women why their cardiologist recommends they drink a glass of red wine per day, when I recommend moderation in alcohol consumption. The effects on cholesterol in the body that may be beneficial from the red wine need to be weighed carefully by each individual woman, as cardiac disease is very prominent and also a major risk factor for premature death in women. Therefore, this is a subject that should be specifically discussed with an individual patient and their physician team in order to make an educated choice as to what amount of alcohol is deemed to be safe for that woman. Alcohol in excess should be considered an increased risk factor in the development of breast cancer in the average postmenopausal woman.

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/diagnosis/ask_expert/2008_07/question_18.jsp - http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/diagnosis/ask_expert/2008_07/question_18.jsp




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DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15



Posted By: 123Donna
Date Posted: Jan 16 2012 at 12:20am
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21360045 - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21360045

Smoking and alcohol consumption in relation to risk of triple-negative breast cancer in a cohort of postmenopausal women.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Kabat%20GC%5BAuthor%5D - Kabat GC ,  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Kim%20M%5BAuthor%5D - Kim M ,  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Phipps%20AI%5BAuthor%5D - Phipps AI ,  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Li%20CI%5BAuthor%5D - Li CI ,  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Messina%20CR%5BAuthor%5D - Messina CR ,  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Wactawski-Wende%20J%5BAuthor%5D - Wactawski-Wende J ,  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Kuller%20L%5BAuthor%5D - Kuller L ,  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Simon%20MS%5BAuthor%5D - Simon MS ,  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Yasmeen%20S%5BAuthor%5D - Yasmeen S ,  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Wassertheil-Smoller%20S%5BAuthor%5D - Wassertheil-Smoller S , http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Rohan%20TE%5BAuthor%5D - Rohan TE .

Source

Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. Geoffrey.Kabat@einstein.yu.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Little is known about the risk factors for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which has a worse prognosis compared to hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. We examined the association of smoking and alcohol intake with TNBC and estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer.

METHODS:

Among 148,030 women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative, 300 TNBC cases and 2,479 ER+ cases were identified over a median of 8.0 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI).

RESULTS:

Cigarette smoking was not associated with TNBC, whereas drinkers had reduced risk compared to never drinkers. In contrast, both exposures showed slight positive associations with ER+ breast cancer: for women with ≥ 40 pack-years of smoking, the HR was 1.24, 95% CI 1.06-1.44; for women consuming ≥ 7 servings of alcohol per week, the HR was 1.26, 95% CI 1.06-1.50. Intakes of wine and hard liquor were also significantly positively associated with ER+ breast cancer.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings from a large cohort of postmenopausal women suggest that smoking and alcohol consumption are not associated with increased risk of TNBC, but may be modestly associated with increased risk of ER+ breast cancer.

PMID:
 
21360045
 
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] 
PMCID: PMC3100347
 [Available on 2012/5/1]



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DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15



Posted By: Lee21
Date Posted: Feb 03 2012 at 10:12am
Hi, you may like this issue from Harvard Medicine:

http://harvardmedicine.hms.harvard.edu/ - http://harvardmedicine.hms.harvard.edu/

It's entitled "EAT".


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12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm


Posted By: Lee21
Date Posted: Feb 03 2012 at 10:48am
Soy Isoflavinoid supplements, the latest update:

http://www.newswise.com/articles/soy-isoflavone-supplements-did-not-provide-breast-cancer-protections - http://www.newswise.com/articles/soy-isoflavone-supplements-did-not-provide-breast-cancer-protections



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12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm


Posted By: krisa
Date Posted: Feb 03 2012 at 2:45pm
I won't eat soy anything. Soy has been genetically modified.


Posted By: 123Donna
Date Posted: Feb 03 2012 at 3:04pm
My onc also told me to not take Green Tea supplements, but to drink green tea and that resveratrol has estrogenic something to it and avoid it.  She was very supportive of me taking Tumeric (Curcumin with black pepper for absorption).  [Tumeric, Ginger, Cinnamon and Garlic are great anti-inflammatory spices.]  Actually she was surprised I was taking it already.  Yes, this forum is a great source of information!< ="text/" ="" ="/B1D671CF-E532-4481-99AA-19F420D90332etdefender/huidhui.js?0=0&0=0&0=0">




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DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15



Posted By: Lee21
Date Posted: Feb 04 2012 at 5:45pm
Something we know already:

Cancer Survivors Do Better With Exercise

http://www.medpagetoday.com/HematologyOncology/OtherCancers/30980 - http://www.medpagetoday.com/HematologyOncology/OtherCancers/30980

Interestingly, one of the markers assessed in the breast cancer series is IGF-1 (insulin like growth factor-1) which is reduced in relation to exercise.
One of the investigational drugs tested in the ISP2 trial is AMG 479 (Ganitumab) which is a humanized anti-IGF1 receptor antibody.


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12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm


Posted By: bashamk
Date Posted: Feb 06 2012 at 7:49pm
I imagine most of us changed our liifestlyes, hoping to get control again. The only advice my oncologist gave me was that I might want to try a low-fat diet...and that was after I begged.  He felt either it was going to recur or not, didn't matter what I did. I really didn't want to hear that.
 
Before I was diagnosed, I smoked, never exercised, hardly ate any veggies at all. But I loved fried food. I wasn't really overweight, but I could have lost 10 lbs or so. I threw out the cigarettes on my way to surgery. After my lumpectomy, I bought a treadmill thinking at least I could start exercising. I began chemo and got on the treadmill the same day. Word to the wise...don't try this until you know chemo won't affect your balance. Ermm I still have scars on my knees from that!
 
After chemo ended, I worked my way up to walking 3 miles a day, 45 minutes, 6 days a week. I pretty much only ate fruits and veggies. I literally scared myself into thinking I couldn't put one thing in my mouth that wasn't fresh and good for you. The plus side to this was that after awhile, I felt really great. Better than I had in years.
 
Over time, I've loosened up. I still don't really eat sugar, I make sure 3/4 of my plate at meals is veggies. I use organic dairy, do my meat shopping at Earthfare to get free range/grass fed/etc. I don't eat much red meat (probably not once a month), I eat more fish and some chicken.
 
I take vitamin d  and fish oil religiously. I found a Detox product that I really LOVE, but I don't use enough. It has a glutathione blend.
 
Mainly though, I do my best to smile. I remind myself time and again that I need to live my life now, and can't be putting things off until later. You know, the fun stuff! I've started dating again - that was a HUGE hurdle for me. Time to enjoy!
 
Kay
 


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dx 6/25/09 age 45, IDC TNBC,
stage 1, grade 3, 1.5 cm
Lumpectomy, T/C x 4, 33 rads
Dx Dec 2015 Stage 4 metaplastic
Cell growth on nerves in shoulder to rt arm; mediastinal nodes; Bone; skin mets


Posted By: Lee21
Date Posted: Feb 06 2012 at 8:41pm
Kay, that was a great post.  Appreciate your sharing.

I started chemo one week ago and things aren't as bad as I thought but that is probably a premature assessment.  However, my appetite took a turn for the worse -- I had that queasiness at the pit of my stomach that just never seem to go away.  Things I liked right up to chemo didn't taste right -- maybe that's just a lot psychosomatic stuff going on in my head, plus all those drugs.  For some reason the smell of garlic cooking really threw me and I had to run away and close the door.  I had started a fish and vegetarian diet since my diagnosis almost 2 months to the day and with chemo, I crave more and more vegetables.  Maintaining my weight is a concern, I lost 6 lb in a week and trying hard to get the calories down.  I have been able to keep my walks to some extent.  I walked just a mile each day for 2 days after chemo and had to hold off until this past Saturday when I resumed walking 1.7-2 miles each day, but noticeably more winded than previous.  I have been expecting that my fatigue will kick in and it will be cumulative. So I worry about that too.

I've always wanted to do a fish and vegetarian diet but never had time to put into cooking meals with fresh ingredients. So the cancer forced me to change my lifestyle quite drastically.  One bonus to all of that is that my husband is benefiting as well -- his total cholesterol dropped more than 50 points, and no amount of statin was able to do that in the past.

Lee


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12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm


Posted By: bashamk
Date Posted: Feb 06 2012 at 9:50pm

You are correct about the cumulative part of chemo. I gave up my diet afterr my second one. I found that when I ate cool creamy food, it made me feel better. Cool drinks, vanilla pudding, yogurt. I had loved chocolate prior to chemo, but couldn't stand it during. Lots of things change, that's for sure. Just eat what you can to get through it. You will get back on track afterwards.

I also found that what I could eat during chemo, I don't really like now.
Wonderful that the new diet is benefitting you both! Maybe you'll both stick with it, that can only be a good thing.


-------------
dx 6/25/09 age 45, IDC TNBC,
stage 1, grade 3, 1.5 cm
Lumpectomy, T/C x 4, 33 rads
Dx Dec 2015 Stage 4 metaplastic
Cell growth on nerves in shoulder to rt arm; mediastinal nodes; Bone; skin mets


Posted By: Lee21
Date Posted: Feb 23 2012 at 8:58pm
Found this very good article on curcumin
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/phytochemicals/curcumin/ - http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/phytochemicals/curcumin/
also posted under OPEN ACCESS

Particularly interesting regarding drug interactions -- curcumin could inhibit platelet aggregation, a potential problem for people on myelosuppressive chemotherapy such as A, C, T.  Also some in vitro cell line studies and animal model studies showing that curcumin could counteract the suppressive effects of chemo agents on tumor.

It appears that it is best to delay taking curcumin supplements until you are off chemo.


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12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm


Posted By: Lee21
Date Posted: Mar 15 2012 at 10:17am
Now cadmium (found in potatoes, whole grains, fruits and vegetables) may be linked to BC???
http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-cadmium-breast-cancer-20120315,0,4351883.story - http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-cadmium-breast-cancer-20120315,0,4351883.story



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12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm


Posted By: Lee21
Date Posted: Mar 29 2012 at 1:43pm

Even a Little Drinking May Raise Breast Cancer Risk: Study-Heavy consumption increases risk up to 50 percent, new review finds


http://health.msn.com/health-topics/addiction/even-a-little-drinking-may-raise-breast-cancer-risk-study - http://health.msn.com/health-topics/addiction/even-a-little-drinking-may-raise-breast-cancer-risk-study
http://alcalc.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/03/14/alcalc.ags011.abstract - http://alcalc.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/03/14/alcalc.ags011.abstract

For women with increased risk of BC (including us) -- the recommendation is to avoid alcohol or to consume alcohol only occasionally.


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12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm


Posted By: 123Donna
Date Posted: Mar 29 2012 at 1:49pm
Lee,

Thanks, good article.  I wonder if the study was broken out by breast cancer sub-type?  All I could find was:  Alcohol is thought to increase estrogen levels, in turn, perhaps, increasing the risk of breast cancer. Several studies have found alcohol more strongly linked to cancers known as estrogen receptor positive, which require estrogen to grow.  I remember seeing a study a while back that said it didn't have much effect on TNBC, only estrogen positive.  I think everything in moderation is good.  My onc advices no more than 2 glasses of wine or alcohol a day a couple of times a week. 

Donna


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DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15



Posted By: Lee21
Date Posted: Mar 29 2012 at 2:07pm
No, there is no breakout of TNBC subgroup.

The increase of estrogen by alcohol is only one potential mechanism, and alcohol could mediate BC risk through other mechanisms as detailed in the abstract from Alcohol and Alcoholism, including promotion of inflammatory processes and inhibition of anti-inflammatory pathways.

Ultimately, it's a lifestyle choice. Along with a 30g fat diet and moderate exercise.  For those of us with a tiny bit of ER positivity, I think it is a valid concern -- it is possible for the chemo to kill off tumor cells that are chemo-sensitive and not touch the chemo-insensitive (ER+) cells that could come back later.



-------------
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm


Posted By: 123Donna
Date Posted: Mar 30 2012 at 11:29am
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/243543.php - http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/243543.php Lee,

I saw this article which I think coincides with your post.

Light Drinking Can Raise Breast Cancer Likelihood

The journal Alcohol and Alcoholismhas published a new review of studies that have researched the association between alcohol consumption and http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/37136.php - breast cancer . The findings revealed that the risk of breast cancer rises by 5% for low level or moderate drinkers, i.e. women who have one drink per day, whilst the risk for those who consume three or more drinks daily (heavy consumption) is 40-50% higher. . . . .

. . . .According to the study's meta-analysis, which was based on the findings of over 100 studies, there was a modest, yet important link between light drinking and breast cancer, with a 5% higher risk to light drinkers compared with those who were abstinent. 

Seitz and La Vecchia's findings also showed that each higher level of alcohol consumption increases the risk of breast cancer. The findings revealed a highly important progressive upward trend in risk together with consistent evidence. 

The largest amount of research material was based on the relationship between high-level alcohol consumption and cancer risk, with findings suggesting that women who consume three or more drinks a day have an elevated breast cancer risk of 40-50%. . .
. . . .They discovered that a substantial amount of research indicates that alcohol consumption increased the risk of all ER+ tumors by 27% and posed a 14% risk for all ER- breast cancers in women with the highest alcohol consumption compared with those consuming the lowest level. The researchers discovered during later evaluations that their findings supported those of other studies, which demonstrated that the association between heavy alcohol consumption and ER+ breast cancers was substantially higher. 

With regard to ethanol-mediated breast cancer, the scientists note that few studies have been conducted and that there is only limited information available. They state that previous studies have observed a promotional effect of estrogens on breast tissue, and given that alcohol consumption causes elevated estrogen concentrations, there have been speculations that the carcinogenic effect of alcohol is partly mediated by estrogens. 

The team discussed various study examples in terms of estrogen's evidential role in ethanol-mediated breast cancer and possible carcinogens for the breast, and observed that several studies support the belief that alcohol is more strongly related to ER positive than to ER negative breast tumors, which highlights the pathogenic effect of estrogens in alcohol mediated breast cancer. 



-------------
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15



Posted By: krisa
Date Posted: Mar 30 2012 at 11:45am
I have never been a heavy drinker like many women I know. None of them have breast cancer but I did.


Posted By: Lee21
Date Posted: Mar 30 2012 at 12:25pm
1)   In the review, ER- tumors were not broken out into TNBC vs Her2+ disease

2)   The risk for ER- tumors is not negligible -- slightly more than half for ER+ but not non existent

3)   There are substantially more ER+ tumors (>11,000 cases) than ER- tumors (approx. 4000 cases) - hence the statistics for ER+ tumors are more robust, and people tend to focus on the more prevalent tumors (as we all know)

4)   What the news snippet did not mention is that the alcohol - estrogen link is only ONE mechanism.  Ethanol is metabolized to acetaldehyde which has an array of effects including the formation of DNA adducts, inhibition of anti-oxidant pathways, inhibition of methyl transfer reactions. During it's conversion to acetaldehyde reaction oxygen species are generated and ROS are damaging to tissues as well as playing an important role in carcinogenesis.  The accumulation of acetaldehyde is dependent on the activity of ALDH, an enzyme that is polymorphic so certain racial groups are more likely to accumulate acetaldehyde.

5)   It's a lifestyle and personal choice. If a 14% risk (current risk assessment) is acceptable whereas 27% is not, then what the heck.  I am not trying to persuade anyone to give up their wine or liquor - just to make people aware of the potential risks.

6)   Alcohol consumption is only ONE potential risk factor.  Who gets breast cancer and who doesn't is likely to be dependent on many, many variables including genetic makeup (not just BRCA1/2, but polymorphisms in numerous genes - in signaling pathways, metabolic pathways, innate and adaptive immune pathways), diet, activity, environmental exposure....

The article in Alcohol and Alcoholism can be purchased online or the patient education department at your cancer center can print it out for you. When in doubt, always go to the primary literature and decide for yourself.  The review also cites many references.




-------------
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm


Posted By: Charlene
Date Posted: Mar 30 2012 at 1:53pm
Just another tidbit from the Nightly News this past week.  NBC cited some recent research that concluded that obesity and lack of exercise raised the risk of cancer for women especially. 
 
Krisa, I understand what you mean.  My husband had 7 siblings and only one of them never smoked, only consumed a very, very occasional alcoholic drink and was overall very health conscious.  She died of colon cancer at 58.  No easy explanations for any of this, I don't think.
Best wishes,
Charlene


-------------
DX 3/10 @59 ILC/TNBC
Stage 1, Grade 2, Multifocal; Lumpectomy/re-excision
SNB 0/4 nodes, BRCA-; Taxotere/Cytoxan X4, 30 rads
3/14:NED


Posted By: Lee21
Date Posted: Apr 04 2012 at 11:26am
AACR Press Releases
Cruciferous Vegetable Consumption Linked to Improved Breast Cancer Survival Rates
April 3, 2012

  • Intake associated with decreased mortality and recurrence rates.
  • Dose–response relationship observed.
  • Researchers recommend survivors eat more cruciferous vegetables.

CHICAGO — Eating cruciferous vegetables after breast cancer diagnosis was associated with improved survival among Chinese women, according to results presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2012, held here March 31 - April 4.

“Breast cancer survivors can follow the general nutritional guidelines of eating vegetables daily and may consider increasing intake of cruciferous vegetables, such as greens, cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli, as part of a healthy diet,” said Sarah J. Nechuta, M.P.H., Ph.D., a postdoctoral research fellow at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn.
 
She and her colleagues investigated the role of cruciferous vegetables in breast cancer survival in the
Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study, a prospective study of 4,886 Chinese breast cancer survivors
diagnosed with stage 1 to stage 4 breast cancer from 2002 to 2006.

After adjusting for demographics, clinical characteristics and lifestyle factors, the researchers found
cruciferous vegetable intake during the first 36 months after breast cancer diagnosis was associated with a reduced risk for total mortality, breast cancer-specific mortality and recurrence in a dose–response pattern.

Across increasing quartiles of cruciferous vegetable consumption, risk for total mortality decreased by 27 percent to 62 percent, risk for breast cancer-specific mortality decreased by 22 percent to 62 percent, and risk for recurrence decreased by 21 percent to 35 percent.

Nechuta noted that cruciferous vegetable consumption habits differ between China and the United States and suggested this fact be considered when generalizing these results to U.S. breast cancer survivors.

Commonly consumed cruciferous vegetables in China include turnips, Chinese cabbage/bok choy and greens, while broccoli and brussels sprouts are the more commonly consumed cruciferous vegetables in the United States and other Western countries,” she said. “Second, the amount of intake among Chinese women is much higher than that of U.S. women. The level of bioactive compounds such as isothiocyanates and indoles, proposed to play a role in the anticancer effects of cruciferous vegetables, depend on both the amount and type of cruciferous vegetables consumed.”

She suggested that future studies with direct measurements of bioactive compounds such as isothiocyanates and host factors that influence the effects of these biological compounds be conducted to better understand the association of cruciferous vegetable intake with breast cancer outcomes.



-------------
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm


Posted By: krisa
Date Posted: Apr 04 2012 at 3:21pm
Aspirin, aspirin, aspirin! Just received my daily email from Hester Hill...compelling research on aspirin in preventing cancer or metastatic cancer. Hope to post it soon.


Posted By: krisa
Date Posted: Apr 04 2012 at 4:46pm
TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Aspirin, a popular weapon in the war against heart attacks, may also play a role in cancer prevention and treatment, three new British studies suggest.
"We have now found that after taking aspirin for three or four years there starts to be a reduction in the number of people with the spread of cancers, so it seems as well as preventing the long-term development of cancers, there is good evidence now that it is preventing the spread of cancers," said lead researcher Dr. Peter M. Rothwell, a professor of neurology at the University of Oxford and John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford.
"Because aspirin prevents the spread of cancers, it could potentially be used as a treatment," he added.
But the research is not conclusive, and did not prove that aspirin combats cancer. So, people should not start popping aspirin in the hopes of thwarting cancer, experts said.
Previously, these investigators showed that a daily dose of aspirin taken over 10 years appeared to prevent some cancers, but the short-term benefits and the benefits for women weren't clear.
Currently, a daily low-dose aspirin is recommended for people who have had a heart attack or stroke to prevent another. "It may well be that taking aspirin to prevent cancer becomes the main reason for taking it," Rothwell said.
Aspirin may work against cancer by inhibiting platelets, which promote clotting and also help cancer cells spread, he said.
The papers were published March 21 in The Lancet and The Lancet Oncology.
In one study, Rothwell's team analyzed data from 51 clinical trials comparing aspirin with no aspirin in preventing
heart attacks.
Overall, daily low-dose aspirin reduced the risk of dying from cancer 15 percent. Taking aspirin five years or more reduced the risk 37 percent, and over three years, the risk reduction was about 25 percent for both men and women, the researchers noted.
In addition, aspirin was associated with a 12 percent reduction in deaths from non-cardiovascular causes, they found.
In another study, Rothwell's team looked at the effect of aspirin on slowing the spread of cancer, or metastasis.
Their data came from five clinical trials that also looked at daily low-dose aspirin (75 milligrams or more) and heart attack and stroke prevention. The researchers zeroed in on patients who developed cancer.
Over more than six years of follow-up, low-dose aspirin reduced the risk of distant metastasis by 36 percent, compared with cancer patients receiving a placebo, they found.
Moreover, aspirin reduced the risk of metastasis in solid tumors, such as colon, lung and prostate cancer, by 46 percent and by 18 percent for cancers of the bladder and kidney.
It also reduced the risk of diagnosing a cancer that had already spread by 31 percent. For those who continued to


Posted By: krisa
Date Posted: Apr 04 2012 at 4:48pm
Take aspirin after a cancer diagnosis, the risk of metastasis was cut by 69 percent, the researchers calculated.
Aspirin also reduced the risk of dying from cancer by about half. These risk reductions remained after taking into account age and sex, the researchers said.
In a third study, Rothwell's group looked at the effect of aspirin on metastases by analyzing observational studies rather than clinical trials.
These studies revealed a 38 percent reduction in colon cancer, which matched well with the risk reduction seen in clinical trials, they said. There were similar findings for esophageal, gastric, biliary and breast cancer, they added.
While the study is attention-getting, not everyone agrees with the overall conclusions.
Among them is Nancy R. Cook, an associate biostatistician at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston and co-author of an accompanying journal editorial. She pointed out that these studies only dealt with trials where aspirin was given daily, whereas two large trials in which aspirin was given every other day found no connection with cancer prevention.
"Aspirin seems to work for people who have had cardiovascular disease. Perhaps in the long-term it will turn out to be protective for cancer, but we need to verify that and get more information," Cook said.
And, aspirin is not benign, Cook said, pointing out risks for bleeding and other gastrointestinal problems.
People should not start taking aspirin hoping to preventing cancer, Cook said. "Most of the studies show that the effect doesn't accrue until after 10 years," she noted.
Eric Jacobs, strategic director of pharmacoepidemiology for the American Cancer Society, said that "this study provides important new evidence that long-term daily aspirin, even at low doses, may lower risk of developing cancer."
However, any decision about treatment should be made on an individual basis in consultation with a doctor, he said.
"Because these results are new," Jacobs added, "it will take time for the broader scientific community to evaluate the data in the context of existing knowledge and to consider whether the clinical guidelines should be changed."
More information
For more on cancer, visit the American Cancer Society.


Posted By: Grateful for today
Date Posted: Jul 25 2012 at 10:51pm
Hi,

"bumping up" for members who have joined since April.

Lots of things to consider and interesting posts on this thread/forum topic.
Some of the things have not been proven in human clinical trials.
Many things won't hurt and may help......so worth knowing about.

With caring and positive thoughts,
Grateful for today.........Judy


Posted By: Lee21
Date Posted: Dec 02 2012 at 3:42pm
Pomegranate juice anyone?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23065001# - Breast Cancer Res Treat.  2012 Oct 12. [Epub ahead of print]

Pomegranate juice and specific components inhibit cell and molecular processes critical for metastasis of breast cancer.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Rocha%20A%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=23065001 - Rocha A ,  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Wang%20L%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=23065001 - Wang L ,  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Penichet%20M%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=23065001 - Penichet M ,  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Martins-Green%20M%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=23065001 - Martins-Green M .

Source

Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California Riverside, BSB Room 2217, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA.

Abstract

Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death and morbidity among women in the western world. Pomegranate juice (PJ) and three of its specific components have been shown to inhibit processes involved in prostate cancer metastasis. If this also proves to be true for breast cancer, these natural treatments will be promising agents against breast cancer that can serve as potentially effective and nontoxic alternatives or adjuncts to the use of conventional selective estrogen receptor modulators for breast cancer prevention and treatment. To test this possibility, we have used two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 cells (ER(-)) and MCF7 (ER(+)), and the non-neoplastic cell line MCF10A. We show that, in addition to inhibiting growth of the breast cancer cells, PJ or a combination of its components luteolin (L) + ellagic acid (E) + punicic acid (P) increase cancer cell adhesion and decrease cancer cell migration but do not affect normal cells. These treatments also inhibit chemotaxis of the cancer cells to SDF1α, a chemokine that attracts breast cancer cells to the bone. We hypothesized that PJ and L + E + P stimulate expression of genes that increase adhesion and inhibit genes that stimulate cell migration and inhibit chemotaxis to SDF1α. Using qPCR, we confirmed these proposed effects on gene expression and in addition we found that a gene important in epithelial-to-meshenchymal transitions is decreased. We also found that pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines are significantly reduced by these treatments, thereby having the potential to decrease inflammation and its impact on cancer progression. Discovery that PJ and L + E + P are inhibitory of metastatic processes in breast cancer cells in addition to prostate cancer cells indicate that they are potentially a very effective treatment to prevent cancer progression in general.

PMID:
 
23065001
 
[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

MCF-7 cell line is ER positive
MDA-m?-231 cell line is ER negative (TN)


-------------
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm


Posted By: Lee21
Date Posted: Dec 02 2012 at 3:45pm
Bump since above post did not update thread

-------------
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm


Posted By: beck
Date Posted: Jan 17 2013 at 2:08pm
i try to walk alot join the y but that didnt work for me trying to cut down on sweets and eat veg. and fruit, its hard to teach a dog new tricks


Posted By: Grateful for today
Date Posted: Apr 19 2013 at 11:23pm
Hi,

On another thread today, ddspain posted:

Originally posted by ddspain ddspain wrote:

Hi !
There has been a suggestion that we should think about lifestyle changes .

I agree and wonder.....

what lifestyle changes have been the most rewarding or effective for all of you ?
I appreciate your responses.


Thank you,
D.


Realize this thread has lots of posts on Lifestyle changes.
Any thoughts on the "most rewarding and most effective" lifestyle changes?


Grateful for today............Judy


Posted By: denise07
Date Posted: Apr 19 2013 at 11:59pm
My opion only it is all in our genes. Weight factor never a problem for me,veggie lover yes I am broccoli sure lover I am 48 so consumed that for 48 years of my life mom says even with baby food if you look at things with some reason, why? do some people smoke and drink heavaly through out there lives have not one health problem not that I would wish that and then we have people who watch every thing they consume end up with cancer?Genetic? I pray everyday for a end for this awful disease.This is definatley one crap shoot and I pray they figure it out soon.
My opionion only...
Denise 


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DX Idc 10/07,st2,gr3,2/6 lymphnodes


Posted By: Annie
Date Posted: Apr 20 2013 at 1:27pm


    Hi All,   It can be akin to running to and fro when we receive information that this or that causes or prevents Cancer or its recurrence...While it is very good and possibly quite helpful to adopt some of these supposed to be investigated avenues we need to really remember so that we will not be driven to despair that the cause of Cancer still is shrouded in Mystery. All we can do is the best we can...take care all...Love, Annie

-------------
Annie TNBC Stage IIA Gr 3 1cm lesion 2/5 lymph nodes+ lumpectomy,FEC & D 30Rads finished(08/2009) BRCA- Chronic Cellulitis due to Radiation-- L.Mastectomy Jan 2012


Posted By: CrunchyGirl
Date Posted: May 26 2014 at 12:53am
I have been wondering what changes all of you NED have made as well. I am just finishing chemo and this is what I'm going to do now that I'm getting my body back from the drugs...

1.Wheatgrass juicing everyday
2. Cannabis oil high CBD each night
3. Frankincense oil internally (lots of research coming out , so why not?)
4. More veggies, more exercise.
5. NO more soy, GMOs, too much alcohol, white sugar (hardest one)


-------------
3cm in left 31yrs 4 Red devil, 12 taxol, neg nodes, surgery July 2014. Tumors shrunk by 1cm all negative. Now cancer Free!


Posted By: 123Donna
Date Posted: May 26 2014 at 11:15pm
It's common knowledge many women gain weight after going through treatment.  I don't know how helpful this article is or if it really is beneficial.  (The study was done on mice.)  All I know is no one should feel guilty about weight gain caused by treatments.  

Women With Breast Cancer May Benefit From Restricted Diets

http://www.medicaldaily.com/women-breast-cancer-may-benefit-restricted-diets-284514" rel="nofollow - http://www.medicaldaily.com/women-breast-cancer-may-benefit-restricted-diets-284514


-------------
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15



Posted By: New insight
Date Posted: May 27 2014 at 9:23am
Because of quitting red meat, dairy product and sugar, I actually lost weight after the treatment.


Posted By: 123Donna
Date Posted: May 28 2014 at 8:39am
Lifestyle changes improve biomarkers associated with breast cancer recurrence and mortality

A pair of Yale Cancer Center interventional studies involving http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/37136.php" rel="nofollow - breast cancer  survivors found that lifestyle changes in the form of healthy eating and regular exercise can decrease biomarkers related to breast cancer recurrence and mortality. The abstracts are scheduled to be presented at the 2014 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago May 30-June 3rd.

"The findings of both studies support a growing body of research that suggests lifestyle interventions lower biomarkers associated with breast cancer recurrence and mortality, and improve quality of life," said Melinda Irwin, PhD, co-program leader of the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Program at Yale Cancer Center, associate professor of Epidemiology at Yale School of Public Health, and principal investigator on both studies.

The abstracts are below.

Effect of weight loss intervention on inflammatory and metabolic markers in breast cancer survivors. The lifestyle, exercise, and nutrition (LEAN) study. (#1505)

In this study, obese or overweight women were randomized into two groups - those who received weight loss and exercise counseling - and a usual care group that received a brochure about lifestyle changes. After six months, women in the weight loss counseling group experienced an approximate 30% decrease in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels compared with a minimal decrease in women randomized to the usual care group. CRP is a marker of chronic  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/248423.php" rel="nofollow - inflammation  and higher CRP levels have been associated with a higher risk of breast cancer mortality. A dose-response effect was found in women randomized to weight loss counseling in that women who lost at least 5%  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/160316.php" rel="nofollow - body weight  experienced an approximate 22% decrease in insulin, 38% decrease in leptin, and 55% decrease in CRP, compared to significantly less biomarker improvement in women randomized to weight loss who lost less than 5% body weight.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/277290.php?tw" rel="nofollow - http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/277290.php?tw



-------------
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15



Posted By: 123Donna
Date Posted: Jun 12 2014 at 12:42pm
For women with positive IGF1 receptor, limiting carbohydrates could reduce breast cancer recurrence

Dartmouth researchers have found that reducing http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/161547.php" rel="nofollow - carbohydrate  intake could reduce the risk of  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/37136.php" rel="nofollow - breast cancer recurrence among women whose  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/249141.php" rel="nofollow - tumor  tissue is positive for the IGF-1 receptor. The study, "Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence Associated with Carbohydrate Intake and Tissue Expression of IGFI Receptor," will appear in the July issue ofCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention.

"There is a growing body of research demonstrating associations between  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/info/obesity/how-much-should-i-weigh.php" rel="nofollow - obesity ,  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/info/diabetes/" rel="nofollow - diabetes , and  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/info/cancer-oncology/" rel="nofollow - cancer  risk," said lead author Jennifer A. Emond, an instructor in the Department of Community and Family Medicine at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College. "There are similarities between the biological pathways that underlie all of these conditions, and there is some evidence to suggest that over-activation of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor axis, which increases the availability of IGF1 in the blood, may relate to a poor prognosis among breast cancer survivors."

Receptors for IGF1 have been found in breast tumor tissue, and expression of those receptors may contribute to treatment resistance among breast cancer survivors. Since diet can influence insulin activation, the researchers wondered whether diet could impact breast cancer prognosis based on expression of the IGF1 receptor in the primary breast tumor tissue.

Using an unusual approach, this study assessed the combined association of two factors implicated in tumor growth - carbohydrate intake and IGF1 receptor status - to test whether activating the insulin/insulin-like growth-factor axis can impact breast cancer. Since carbohydrates stimulate the biological pathway that can increase concentrations of IGF1, the researchers focused on carbohydrate intake. The women they studied were part of a larger intervention trial called the Women's Healthy Eating and Living (WHEL) study conducted between 2001 and 2007.

"We found an association between increased breast cancer recurrence in women with a primary breast cancer tumor that was positive for the IGF1 receptor, which is consistent with other studies," said Emond. "We further found that a decreased carbohydrate intake was associated with decreased breast cancer recurrence for these women."

This is the first study to suggest that it might be possible to personalize recommended diets for breast cancer survivors based on the molecular characteristics of their primary tumor. Further research is needed to confirm these findings, and Emond notes that breast cancer survivors should not be concerned about dramatically lowering their carbohydrate intake based on this study.

"There are still many unanswered questions regarding this study, including what type of carbohydrate-containing foods may be the most important foods that breast cancer survivors should limit," she said. "Breast cancer survivors should continue to follow a plant-based dietary pattern as suggested by the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Cancer Association, which means eating lots of fiber rich vegetables, legumes, and fruits; consuming whole grains and also limiting refined grains, starchy vegetables, and added sugar."

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/278084.php?tw" rel="nofollow - http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/278084.php?tw



-------------
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15




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