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Age-Longevity

Printed From: TNBC Foundation
Category: TNBC Forums
Forum Name: Archived Topics
Forum Description: Archived Topics
URL: http://forum.tnbcfoundation.org/forum_posts.asp?TID=13708
Printed Date: Dec 02 2020 at 10:55am
Software Version: Web Wiz Forums 12.01 - http://www.webwizforums.com


Topic: Age-Longevity
Posted By: CMDW
Subject: Age-Longevity
Date Posted: Jul 03 2020 at 2:51pm
I was just curious...I donít want to live to be 100, but I would like to see my grandchildren grow up.  Wondering how old the oldest TNBC survivors are.  If you think you might be one of the oldest, please chime in!

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66 at diagnosis. 3/2019, AC/T, lumpectomy, 30 radiation. Complete 12/19. IDC, grade 2-3, 4 cores .2-1.5cm, yellow lobulated fibroadipose, stage pT1b, NO



Replies:
Posted By: kirby
Date Posted: Aug 05 2020 at 10:27am
I may be the longest survivor on here at this point. If you look in the archives youíll find topics about survivors. Theyíve often been needed as inspiration. I rarely come on these days and the few that were  longer survivors than I, werenít on a lot [back when I was.] we just get busy and cancer isnít as prominent in our lives. 

I was dx in 2001. TNBC hadnít been named. I only knew what I didnít have.....no estrogen, no progesterone nor her2. Kind of in the dark. Other types had additional txís. Again...I had none. I donít know when TN was actually named. Maybe 2005 or so. I learned what Iíd had thru a customer newly dx. She was telling me she had an especially aggressive cancer...TN. I had to ask what that was. When she described I knew thatís what Iíd had. I hadnít been aware that it was especially aggressive either. I knew my stats and knew it was a grade 3. I started researching then and found this site. It was maybe a year old at the time. 

My tx was what was protocol for the day. Tx wasnít particularly discussed as options. I think you were expected to just follow drís orders. I knew I could have had a mastectomy but that wasnít ever brought up by the dr. It was my choice to go along .Chemo I wasnít given options. 

I donít think of myself as old.....I turned 65 this year. I was dx in January of 2001. 


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kirby

dx Feb. 2001. Age 44
Lumpectomy

2cm. no nodes stage 1 grade 3

4 rnds AC, 35 rads


Posted By: CMDW
Date Posted: Aug 06 2020 at 8:10am
Thank you for your reply.  As others have mentioned, we hear about recurrence so we need the balance of hearing about long term survivors.

I am older than you (just turned 68), but was diagnosed later in life, at 66.  I consider myself a positive person, but find myself fretting over cancer more than Iíd like.  My oncologist said it takes most people about three years after end of treatment to stop thinking about it and fully get on with their lives.

Reading your story IS helpful!  Thanks again, Cindy


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66 at diagnosis. 3/2019, AC/T, lumpectomy, 30 radiation. Complete 12/19. IDC, grade 2-3, 4 cores .2-1.5cm, yellow lobulated fibroadipose, stage pT1b, NO


Posted By: Plume
Date Posted: Aug 06 2020 at 12:39pm
Oh, I just love these stories, please keep them coming!

I am interested in your remark, CMDW, about most people taking 3 years to stop thinking about their cancer.  Well, I have just had my 3rd anniversary and it is indeed true that I am thinking about it less and less.

On the other hand, I do not let down my guard:  taking extra care with nutrition and exercise and these days, of course, aware of measures to prevent catching the covid!  I think the most worrying thing right from the beginning is wondering about what sort of future I would have.

These days, I live more in the present, do not think too much about the future and the "what ifs".  I feel really well, energetic and ALIVE and looking forward to the first of my reconstructive operations in October.

For all those still undergoing treatment, I hope that you will be able to put all of the unpleasant things behind you and that everything will come good in the end!

my very best wishes to allSmile


Posted By: kirby
Date Posted: Aug 06 2020 at 8:21pm
I was a single parent and had just buried my my mother [age 64] who passed from ovarian when I was dx. Not that I want to tell you a sob story! Just couldn't deal with the stress of worry. I read all I could. After I put the kids to bed I read the entire Susan Love Breast Book. If it was coming to get me, I wanted to know what it was. [ I hoped knowledge was key]I also had to get to a place of not worrying until I knew specifically what there was to worry about. Oh, yes....easier said than done. Lots of yoga breathing. I spaced out all those aftercare dr appts so I was being checked about every 3-4 months. I think about year 3-5 they tapered down then by year 10 I was cut loose but I am very vigilant about getting my mammograms. I was on this site quite a bit from maybe 2007 to 2012....maybe a bit longer. When I was dx it didn't have the fear factor and they weren't giving as much chemo....not as aggressive of tx. I kind of felt fortunate, only hind site because I didn't know as much about what I should worry about. I also didn't want to spend a lot of time...[with worry and what if's] on giving cancer power over me. The thought of cancer still enters my mind....just not often. Going thru tx is not something one can forget. I think it does give you a different mindset. That's where these forums are so great, being able to communicate with those that truly understand. It's truly cathartic and easier to let go knowing you aren't alone. 

I did have genetic testing, including the King study [which I found out about on this site. All tests came out negative. 


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kirby

dx Feb. 2001. Age 44
Lumpectomy

2cm. no nodes stage 1 grade 3

4 rnds AC, 35 rads


Posted By: CMDW
Date Posted: Aug 08 2020 at 8:00am
Thank you, Plume and Kirby, for your responses.  A neighbor suggested that I read an old book, The Power of Your Subconscious Mind, to reinforce how our thinking can affect our health.  This book is a bit redundant and may be too religious for some, but I am finding it helpful-especially when I have a pain in my breast (over 7 months after completion of treatment) or soreness in my ribs.  Instead of going to the worst scenario, I tell myself that my body is strong and healthy and able to ward off disease.  Of course, I am still vigilant about follow ups with all of my doctors and will not neglect to continue regular screenings.  Thank you again!  Cindy

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66 at diagnosis. 3/2019, AC/T, lumpectomy, 30 radiation. Complete 12/19. IDC, grade 2-3, 4 cores .2-1.5cm, yellow lobulated fibroadipose, stage pT1b, NO



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