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Laurarev View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Laurarev Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 22 2019 at 7:36am
Kellyless- wow, thank you so much for your reply! You really gave some great advice and already put a lot into perspective for me. Iím sure I have so much more to learn as I go, but it helps so much to hear from people that are already way further along on this journey than I am. I can see how the hair on my head(that will eventually grow back) is trivial compared to a permanent situation like neuropathy. Do I only need to ice my hands and feet during the taxol, not the AC? I met someone yesterday that said she bought ďice pack socksĒ off of amazon. Would you recommend them? I didnít see anything similar for the hands. Do I just put them in a bowl of ice water? Or maybe hold two frozen water bottles? Also, did anyone add Ultima electrolyte replenisher to their water during chemo? 

I had the dreaded conversation with my children last night. They seemed to take the news much better than I had anticipated, although I donít think they will really understand everything until we are living through it. I explained that my surgery is this coming Tuesday and then I will heal for about a month until starting the medicine called chemo. I wonít start losing my hair until I start taking the chemo medicine. Well after lots and lots of talking and many questions they both seemed to be under the assumption that if we go to the beach NEXT week Iíll be bald. 🤷🏻‍♀️ My 11 year old daughter wants to come with me to pick out a wig (she thought we were going last night) and my 13 year old son seems very concerned that my appearance without eyebrows and eyelashes is really going to ďfreak him outĒ. As far as any fears of me dying or changing in any other way, they are both convinced I will be fine! Which is a good thing. 🙂 
 I had to warn them that Iíll be tired and maybe a little nauseous, and I told them it will be their job to keep bringing me water and saying ďmommy, you need to drink this!Ē They are ready to comply and happy to do it:) so overall, the conversation went well and a big worry has been lifted from me. It was very hard to keep this secret from them, but I wanted to wait until they finished school and also until I personally had processed everything and felt a little calmer. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Danzig482 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 22 2019 at 7:52am
laurarev thank you. I was told by jh it would be 8 weeks and 12 weeks . If I add carbo it reverses the order of the taxol but still 20 weeks. Hoping the local onc this week says the same cause Iím tired of making decisions 😂

Kellyless good reminders on diet and taking care of the body. Adding that to my must reread 20000 times list so I have my diet right before not just during. Agree 100% that the circumstances stink but the value of priorities being on track in an elite way improves life overall for the long haul 

I did not know that insurance paid for a wig ( still donít see myself wearing one) I did however learn yesterday that if you call the American Cancer Society they will give you a $70 coupon-amount may very depending on your ZIP Code but they will give you that towards the purchase of a wig on their website. And they do have some that are 70 or less or of course you can pay the difference. They also offer transportation and other benefits that are normal income based for those that need it. Iím fortunate not to need it but thought it was wonderful they do it without bias. Not everyone has family or friends that can take a day off or more every week for 5 months to help with appointments.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Laurarev Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 22 2019 at 8:27am
Thanks for the info on the American Cancer Society. I did not know that!

As far as your comment about being tired of making decisions.....I feel the same way! My surgeon and oncologist kept telling me that I need to be part of this decision process. I felt like telling them both ďthis is all new to me. I have NO idea what to do! Please just decide together and tell me what needs to happen. This is not your first rodeos, but it it is mine. ď

Also, I have another question regarding work. I know a lot of you continued to work through most of this process. All of our jobs are very different and the demands of the work load vary. I was at a group meeting yesterday, where one of the girls said her cousin also had TNBC and was a 2nd grade teacher like me. She said that due to the physical ďenergy levelĒ demands of the job her cousin took an entire school year off. Financially I do not think Iíll be able to do that. I spoke with my HR person on Friday and she said the federal family leave act allows me to take 12 weeks. So when I do the math that gives me sept 2 (first day of school) til nov 22. My question is this.... i think I will be starting radiation late December early January. I donít know how long radiation is, but Iím guessing 5-6 weeks. I have no idea what the energy level is or how people feel during radiation. Is it easier than chemo? Do you think Iíll be ok teaching my 2nd grade class for 7 hours a day and then come home to be a single mom to the demanding schedules of an 11 and 13 yr old? Iím worried 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kellyless Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 22 2019 at 11:40am
The American Cancer society does workshops called "look good feel better" all over the place. it's for women in cancer treatment, I went both times. They go thru dealing with hair loss, makeup during chemo, etc. They usually have piles of wigs, scarves and hats that are free. They give each woman that attends a bag of cosmetics - really good stuff, Chanel, Almay, etc. And it's awesome being in a room full of women going thru the same thing. http://lookgoodfeelbetter.org ;
The main reason my advice always is to just let everyone in your world know about your diagnosis and treatment is that you can't do it alone. You'll be shocked at the outpouring of sympathy, understanding and help you will receive!! And you need to accept that help. Especially if you have kids!! 
I feel like it's been "story time with Kelly, tales from the frontline of Cancer treatment" this week. But I was helped tremendously by women that had been thru this both times, so just trying to pay it forward here. ..
The first time I was diagnosed I was 45, I had a high stress big responsibility job, my husband did too, my 14 yo son suffers from a chronic illness, my daughter was in college 3000 miles away and my mom had died of cancer 1 year prior. Of breast cancer. The parent group of my son's chosen extracurricular activity started a meal sign up for my family. I had chemo every 2 weeks - for the 10 nights starting the day of treatment, folks brought us dinner. 10 nights, 8 times - 80 meals from that alone! It was tremendous, I get teary just thinking about it. There's online free tools for organizing this - the person getting the meals fills out preferences, allergies etc. My son was way into it! Usually the parent showed up with their kid, so my son got to chat for a moment. Then there was the reveal - mostly home cooked meals, but take out from restaurants we like showed up as well. My husband and I kept it light and upbeat - and it was a HUGE help. I felt super icky about it in the beginning, but a woman I'd met online said TAKE THE HELP! (We had a secret family pact - if the food was awful we'd quietly get some takeout on our own but shhhhhhhh don't tell anybody :) friends would call during the day, they knew I was home alone, and ask what could They bring? On my crappier days it was milkshakes and smoothies. I mentioned to someone I needed more dangly earrings because man does being bald make your ears stand out! My girlfriend's started dropping lil super dangly spangly earrings in my mailbox 💜 strangers and friends alike made my time in the cancer treatment trenches so look much easier. Not to mention the moms that asked to include my son in all kinds of things. Movies, sleepovers, etc etc - distractions for him, peace and quiet for us. The point is, put it out there, what you and your family will be dealing with. Cancer, chemo, surgery, radiation over the next X months. You're a teacher - work with your principal on telling your students and sending home an explanatory note or email for the parents. Talk to your kids teachers, let them know it's ok to talk about it with your kids classmates. Tell the cub scout leader, the coaches of their teams. Send out a group email explaining what's going on. BCC everyone that's in your life. Post it on your social media of choice. You can't keep it secret forever anyway - you're going to be obviously a patient soon - so just get it over with and put it out there. When offers of help come take them!!! It makes others feel good to help you, it's a two way street. 
The first time I was lucky, my boss said I could work when I felt like it, don't when I didn't. And financially I could afford to do whatever. I took a full week off after every chemo, but honestly, I could've worked more. I worked full time thru radiation, it was a fast in and out for the treatment each day, most facilities offer very early morning and early evening treatment scheduled as well. The second time..... I quit my job, I'd felt overworked prior to my diagnosis this time, my husband was hugely supportive of me just quitting. I got really sick this time so working would've been tough. Everyone is different, every trip thru treatment is as well. Ask to speak to a social worker at your cancer facility now. Even if you don't need help right now, establish a relationship now, so you can ask for assistance easily later when you need it. The phrase I thought often was, "How do you eat an elephant? One spoonful at a time..." Cancer treatment is your elephant - trying to second guess everything at once is trying to eat your elephant in one bite. Just breathe. ... And dig in, one lil spoonful at a time....in a few months I swear it'll take you by surprise when the elephant is suddenly gone! Your Dr. Will pat you on the head, say "good job eating the whole elephant! Come back and see me every few months to see you if you have to eat another elephant, but I don't think you will. Live your elephant free life now! " . 
PS: I discovered grocery delivery this time. Loved it! You can get it for free by being flexible, sign up for a few stores and use their 1st delivery free, then they'll email you free delivery offers all the time. It works! Same with food delivery - there's oodles of different companies - they all offer first free. Grubhub, uber eats, door dash, postmates, caviar.....
For treatment costs not covered by insurance - copays, deductibles etc., Your facility should work with you. Mine called me outta the blue and asked if I wanted a monthly payment plan?  No interest,low monthly payments - sure, why not? If you can't pay anything now, put it off for a while. Usually they just don't care that much while you're in treatment. They're going to be billing your insurance for a ton of money (my last go round was a quarter million bucks - $250,000. I had complications but still. Dayum) They aren't going to refuse to give you any treatment because you owe a few thousand $$. 
IDC, 2.2 cm, Stage IIb,lumpectomy 1/30/09 ACx4,Tx4 36 rads
6/1/16 Local recurrence same breast, same spot 1.8cm Carb.4x every 3 wks, Taxol 12x once wk. Dbl Mast. PCR!! Reconstruction fail, NED!
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123Donna View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 22 2019 at 12:55pm
Laurarev,

If you have the flexibility, you may need some time off during the AC treatment cycle.  You may want to see how you feel during the first cycle and may only need to miss a few days or a week of each cycle or decide to take the full time off.  It affects every person differently.  Most say the Taxol treatment is much easier without the same side effects.  For me, I didn't find any issues with radiation and worked full time.  It is so much easier than chemo.  The biggest time drain was driving to the radiation appointment each day.  That took longer than the actual radiation.


DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Laurarev Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 24 2019 at 6:43am
Thank you Kellyless for your reply!  You, along with all of the others on here, that have so much knowledge and share it so graciously with us ďnewbiesĒ! You  are appreciated more than you know! 
I am going into Sloan today for some pre surgery procedures   (surgery is tomorrow) and some scans. I am so worried this damn tumor in me has grown. It is so sore to the touch and now I am feeling pain in my armpit. Is a proliferation rate of 67% something I should be highly concerned about? Should they not have waited 4 weeks to take this out?? Could it now be in my lymph nodes???? 
I met with a friend yesterday who recently finished all of her chemo treatments. Granted, she didnít have ac... but she did have 16 rounds of taxol. She recommended that I definitely take cbd oil during treatment as well as receive infrared sauna sessions to reduce inflammation. She also said to only drink alkaline water (can be purchased at Trader Joeís) and to take a probiotic (refrigerated only and can be purchased at Deans market) Does anyone have any experience with these four things? 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Laurarev Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 24 2019 at 6:49am
Thank you for your reply donna123! Fortunately I am a teacher and I have vacation time for the summer. So when I begin the ac treatment (which Iím thinking will be in about 3 weeks) I will still be home for summer break. Iím thinking ac will be August and September, so I am definitely planning on taking the month of September off. I am hoping to take off October and November as well. I will most likely go back to work in December and then start up radiation in January. My hope is that radiation is not as difficult, as you said. My primary concern is that they will be tired, and as a single mom of two young and very active children, it may be a bit challenging. But I have a wonderful support system and I know they will all help as much as they can. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 24 2019 at 7:43am
Hi Laura,

It's good that you will be able to have the time off during treatment.  Fatigue is challenging and being able to rest will help you out during this period.  Regarding the proliferation rate, most of us diagnosed with TNBC are grade 3 and have a high KI-67.  It's a characteristic of TNBC. 

This is from Breastcancer.org:  Your pathology report may include information about the rate of cell growth ó what proportion of the cancer cells within the tumor are growing and dividing to form new cancer cells. A higher percentage suggests a faster-growing, more aggressive cancer, rather than a slower, ďlaid backĒ one. Tests that can measure the rate of growth include:

  • S-phase fraction: This number tells you what percentage of cells in the sample are in the process of copying their genetic information, or DNA. This S-phase, short for ďsynthesis phase,Ē happens just before a cell divides into two new cells. A result of less than 6% is considered low, 6-10% intermediate, and more than 10% is considered high.
  • Ki-67: Ki-67 is a protein in cells that increases as they prepare to divide into new cells. A staining process can measure the percentage of tumor cells that are positive for Ki-67. The more positive cells there are, the more quickly they are dividing and forming new cells. In breast cancer, a result of less than 10% is considered low, 10-20% borderline, and high if more than 20%


DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Laurarev Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 24 2019 at 7:58am
Oh boy! That doesnít sound good. So do you think things have gotten really bad for me over theses past four weeks? 😱
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Laura,

I am a newbie as well.  I was diagnosed this month.  Mine is a bit bigger and it has metted to the axillary node as well.  The thyroid also showed, and I will have that biopsied today.  The surgeon and oncologist think it might be another primary cancer and not breast cancer.  Either way, it is cancer.  However, if it is a breast cancer, it will put me into a Stage IV and I don't know what my path will be if that is the case.

I found a book while watching Joan Lunden on Youtube.  His name is Dr. Zembrowski and he is a chiropractor and has some nutrition training.  The name of his book is, "Rebuild". It is all about getting through chemo and radiation with diet to help your body.  He also covers exercise during treatment.

He is a survivor.  He had a 5 inch tumor in his chest.  He had much the same treatment that  we have for TNBC.  The doctors were not really helping him with his nutrition when his reoccurred.  So, he began researching everything.  I really like his approach to food and supplements.  It is simple.  It's not radical in the sense of a Dr. Terry Wahl's (autoimmune), but you definitely must make changes in your diet.  The biggest take away is NO sugar, no gluten, no soy and no diary (except protein isolate shakes).  

The sugar is the most important thing.  Cancer cells need glucose to proliferate.  If you make it abundant in your body, you are "feeding the beast", as I like to call it.  You can only get your sugar naturally from fruits and vegetables like, apples, carrots etc...
So, it was always tempting to grab those dips and chips or candy bars.  Now, I just pass everything up, and keep walking and repeating to myself, "don't feed the beast!"  I come out unscathed.  It is amazing the will power you have when it is life or death!

I hope this helps, and I am sorry about your diagnosis, but I am glad we found this site! I have already been helped so much from the senior members and those that have gone before me. 

Monarch  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kellyless Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 24 2019 at 12:26pm
Laurarev, my tumor the first time was sore and painful. It was a month between finding it and surgery, it was the same as yours with aggressiveness and KI - most of us are. The "growing" is most likely just you feeling it, obsessing over it (I did too). You can't know if you have it in your lymph nodes for sure until surgery. Mine was just a smidge, not a tumor, didn't change the appearance of the node. It might have shown on a PET scan, but insurance rarely covers a PET the first time you have cancer. The second time it was a lil over a month between diagnosis and chemo. I ended up with a PCR, so again that lag didn't matter. If there's any in your nodes, it's probably been there since before diagnosis. Remind me why they want surgery first with you? I'm sorry, I think you said but can't remember. 
CBD, special water, special diet etc - some of it may help YOU - either treating symptoms, or psychologically give you peace DOING something, but going into chemo, none of it matters really to the cancer whilst in treatment. Y'all are about to do very very agressive, bad ass cancer murdering chemo...YAY you! It's a bit of a rough ride, but lots of research shows that these drugs kill the crap out of our cancer. DO NOT add any vitamin, supplements or anything during treatment without prior approval from your doctor!!! Example: fish oil can prevent the chemo from working. Black Cohosh increases your hormone levels similar to taking hormones. This is not the time to start trying  a bunch of new over the counter stuff Aunt Susies manicurist says will help. There are some vitamins they'll allow - ASK. 
I got Really Sick the second time I did chemo. My cancer buddy (he's had cancer the same time as me twice) did as well, he called and said, "OMG you and I are idiots!!" Neither he nor I had smoked weed since high school. Didn't the first time we got chemo. He'd tried it. It was the magic bullet for both of us getting thru chemo this time. It treated several of my symptoms . We both cleared it with our doctors first. It's not legal here, I'm lucky to have friends and family in California, Colorado and Vegas that'll help a sister out. Everyone is different, you'll find your way once your in the thick of it.
And with diet.... Your cancer facility should have a nutritionist that specializes in cancer patients. I spoke with mine repeatedly thru both times. It's one helluva time to try and drastically change your diet. There's times in chemo that I was lucky to drink water and maybe a milk shake. When the anemia hit I was having steak and sauteed spinach for breakfast (when I could stand it.) You may get mouth sores, you get a weird taste in your mouth (it tastes like.......chemo. And metal) give yourself a break, wait til your through with chemo before you go on a rigorous diet. You need water and calories every day. If you do better than that YAY you had a good day :) 
I avoided mouth sores both times. I washed my mouth out with Biotene mouthwash morning and night and after every meal. I switched to a softer toothbrush and sensidyne toothpaste. Chemo attacks the cells in your mouth, so treat it gently. You want a No Alcohol mouthwash, like Biotene. 
If your anxiety is off the charts talk to your doctor. Same with sleeping issues and depression. There were times I needed a Xanax. Nights where I took Lunesta to sleep. Half way thru chemo the first time I went on low dose antidepressant, it was really helpful for about 4-5 months. Neulasta gave me intense bone pain - I took pain pills on the worst days. The 2nd time I was constipated (I have the constipation cure steps!! A sweet resident in the hospital told me). 
The point of all that is - EVERYONE is different! Only time will tell which if any side effects will be yours to deal with. And you need to be quick and proactive in dealing with them. Do not suffer in silence, you can cause yourself great harm not treating issues that arise. Be kind to yourself, both mentally and physically. Your goal is to get to the other side of treatment, on time and cancer free. Whatever it takes to get there, you and your highly trained medical team will figure it out. 
IDC, 2.2 cm, Stage IIb,lumpectomy 1/30/09 ACx4,Tx4 36 rads
6/1/16 Local recurrence same breast, same spot 1.8cm Carb.4x every 3 wks, Taxol 12x once wk. Dbl Mast. PCR!! Reconstruction fail, NED!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Laurarev Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 24 2019 at 4:58pm
Welcome Monarch! First and foremost, I am sorry to hear of your diagnosis. I will be adding you to my prayers. We are going to be fine! Yes, we have a long road ahead of us... but we canít quit now. We will rise to the occasion, and fight the crap out of this sh*t!!

Thank you for the nutrition suggestions. I will definitely be looking up the book Rebulid. It sounds like a good one! I also just recently found out that Joan lunden and robin Roberts are  triple negative. Iíve looked up a lot about their treatments. They both have such positive outlooks. 

Please keep us posted on how youíre doing. You are correct in saying we are lucky to have found this site. The senior members are wonderful and have a wealth of information!

Laura  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Laurarev Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 24 2019 at 5:13pm
Thank you for your post! I am definitely going to buy the biotene! Iíve heard those mouth sores are the worst 
I just finished up with the seed and the lymph node mapping. Boy did that radioactive dye hurt going in!! The doctor said the tumor does not look like it grew too much, thank God. She did not look at the lymph nodes at all with the ultrasound wand. She said either way theyíre going to take out between 2-5 tomorrow. So fingers crossed really really tight that there is no node involvement.
I hear what your saying about all my special ďtricksĒ... alkaline water, infrared sauna, probiotic, cbd oil. Maybe it will make me feel better just to think Iím doing a little extra (even if itís all in my head) but I will check with the oncologist first, for sure!
I have heard that the chemo concoction that we get for this ďtriple threatĒ is quite a doozy! Well, I guess if weíre going to get chemo we might as well get the kick ass kind... 
I will talk to the nutritionist as well, but I know I am going to have to eat and keep my calorie count up no matter how I do it. Iím only 100 pounds so I canít affird to lose any weight. I know that sugar and dairy are big no noís, but if I need a milk shake every once in a while Iím not going to deny myself 
I agree, the goal is to get through this cancer free, and hopefully without any hiccups! 
I will be praying for you 🙏🏻❤️
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 24 2019 at 7:52pm
It's always good advice to try and eat as healthy as you can, but understand while on chemo, you may end up eating what tastes good to you and gets you by during the treatment.  Trying to eat an anti-inflammatory diet is a great idea, if you can manage it.  I know many people think you have to cut out sugar, but that's a common misconception.  If cutting it out makes you feel good, then definitely do it. 

Reducing dietary sugar not the same

The scientists are keen to point out that reducing sugar in the diet would not lead to the anticancer effects that they showed in the study.

There is no proof that starving the body of sugar lowers a person's risk of developing cancer or that it improves the chances of survival should they be diagnosed with the disease.

There is an indirect link between reduced dietary sugar and lower cancer risk that comes through tackling obesity.

High intakes of dietary sugar raise the risk of obesity, which, in turn, raises the risk of cancer.

"A lot of people," says senior study author Leonard W. Seymour, a professor of gene therapies in the university's oncology department, "think that carbohydrates are bad, but that's not the case ó we need them, and cutting out sugar won't cure cancer."

"Because cancer gobbles up glucose so quickly, the cells are very vulnerable to attack from a drug that targets the sugar pathway. The same effect cannot be achieved by eliminating sugar from your diet."

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323857.php
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Laurarev Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 26 2019 at 2:22pm
Hi everyone... I am home recovering from my lumpectomy and lymph node removal. All went well! The doctor said only one node ďlit upĒ so only one was removed. Thatís good, right?? I know it still has to be sent to pathology for testing, but Iím really hoping for good results. What do you all think? Is it more likely the cancer is in my lymph nodes if she had to remove more than one  node? And if there is any in there, wonít the chemo take care of that? So now I have to wait and see when chemo will start. Iím assuming in about three weeks, but Iím really not sure. Does anyone know if I have to do any special exercises for my lymph node incision to heal properly? I heard something about climbing my hand up the wall like a ladder, but not sure if that applies to me. 
Also, I have a question about icing hands and feet during chemo to prevent neuropathy. Am I supposed to ice for the AC, the taxol, or both? And how long do I ice? Just while the bag of the chemo medicine is dripping into me, or the whole time Iím sitting  there? 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kellyless Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 26 2019 at 4:52pm
Do you have a drain from either surgical site? If so, you will have it for about a week usually, depending on the output. Do you have a post surgical appointment set for next week? I think you are to reduce activity for the first week, give your incisions some time to heal. Did they give you post surgery care instructions? Usually you have a lil packet of info. Trying to think back.... I seem to remember limiting the use on that side for a week until you have your first post surgery appointment. Get your drain out if you have one, incision  checked. Then they should advise you on excercises. If you've a drain, there's daily care for that. If not, checking your incisions for drainage, swelling, redness and heat. Take your temperature a few times a day. Today you're still benefiting from the drugs during surgery and numbing meds at your surgical sites. Do not over do - rest, eat and chill. Tomorrow you may be sore, I'vwe packs and pain meds are options if you need it. Did they tell you how long til they'll have your pathology results? 
IDC, 2.2 cm, Stage IIb,lumpectomy 1/30/09 ACx4,Tx4 36 rads
6/1/16 Local recurrence same breast, same spot 1.8cm Carb.4x every 3 wks, Taxol 12x once wk. Dbl Mast. PCR!! Reconstruction fail, NED!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Laurarev Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 26 2019 at 5:04pm
I donít have any drains. The surgical incisions have glue on the outside, but stitches inside. they told me I could shower today, which I did and everything seems ok. I didnít even think that the numbing medicine and pain meds from yesterday are still kicking in and I will probably be in more discomfort tomorrow when they wear off. They didnít tell me when the pathology reports  will be in and I donít go back to see the surgeon until July 11th 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 26 2019 at 6:44pm
Hi Laura,

I'm glad the surgery went well and you are on to the healing part.  Did they give you any instructions on post-surgery?  Usually they will tell you if you have any restrictions and recovery instructions (exercise, etc).  If not, I'd contact the surgeon's office and ask for guidance. 

"The doctor said only one node ďlit upĒ so only one was removed. Thatís good, right??"  I'm thinking it means that when they injected the dye into the tumor, it only drained to one sentinel node.  During the surgery, they remove the sentinel nodes, the nodes that first drained from the tumor.  It is a good sign and pathology will let you know if they found any cancer cells inside the node.  The good news is even if there were some cells, chemo and radiation will mop them up.

Ask your chemo nurses about the ice.  They can advise when best to use it to prevent neuropathy. 

Donna

DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Laurarev Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 26 2019 at 8:20pm
Thanks for the reply Donna! They gave me two meds post op. One is a pain killer and the other one was described as a very strong type of Advil/anti inflammatory. The only restriction they gave me was not to lift anything over ten pounds for a week. They didnít tell me anything about any exercises.  
Iím glad you said if any cancer is in the node they took out it will be ďmopped upĒ with the chemo and radiation. Thatís what I was hoping!! I really donít want them to have to go in and take more nodes out. 
I will ask the chemo nurses about the ice. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Leahstuffle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 27 2019 at 12:41am
Hey, Laura! I'm late to this party, but wanted to say congratulations on getting through the first big thing.
I worked through my treatment, taking the treatment day off and then the day my nausea drugs wore off, usually five days later. I took a shot called Sustol for nausea and never needed pills. It was a great relief for me.
I have small children and I am metastatic. My greatest recommendation for the upcoming year is to find a community to support you in the evenings. 
We have friends from church who take our boys in the afternoon and bring them home in pajamas ready to go to bed. Please let people make you dinners, or start stocking your freezer now.
I find that it is not the treatment itself that's hard, but the brutal day in/day out neverending appointments that make it difficult to enjoy the regular stuff in a day.

Another tip for neuropathy: B complex vitamins were recommended by my team, particularly B6! It's worth asking about. I took it before I started taxol. I have slight neuropathy that manifested as tinnitus. Go figure.
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