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janinvan View Drop Down
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    Posted: Aug 26 2009 at 8:55am
Connie, Steve, and everyone else:
Has anyone heard about a  ..once -a month medication called Calex or Cafex? (I'll find out more specific info)
A renowned  independent oncologist here and in Canada.. (not part of cancer agency)- is starting to use this.....
Although it's not appropriate for me NOW....interesting.....
JANICE
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Nancy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 26 2009 at 5:50pm
Nancy
DD Lori dx TNBC June 13,2007
Lumpectomy due to incorrect dx of a cyst
mastectomy July 6 2007
chemo ACT all 3 every 3 weeks 6 tx Aug-Nov
28 rads ended Jan 2008
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cg--- Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 26 2009 at 7:53pm
Dear Jan,
 
They use it in the States - called Doxil much more frequently than the Caelyx here. It is a different form of adriamycin.
 
Caelyx is under the EMERGENT drug category for metastatic breast cancer - not accepted as standard of care but may be. 
 
Please keep me posted if they are starting to use it regularly in the metastatic setting.  I know it was approved for ovarian cancer back in 2007.
 
Love,
Connie
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote janinvan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 27 2009 at 9:04am
Nancy, Connie,and everyone else:
Thanks re your Caelyx info....
From your experience..(my CA 15-3 blood tumor marker usually correlates to MY condition...approx. 60 at diagnosis /recurrence ...then reduces......before-- to 17 in 1997...and then to 26 earlier in 2009)
Have you experienced a correlation?   Is 29 the "average" ?
One oncologist told a patient that anything above 0 indicates cancer, etc.
WHY haven't  they accomplished some universal number/norm for it ?
I realize that it's extremely complex!
Is one type of breast cancer more linked to it?
JANICE 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cg--- Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 27 2009 at 3:07pm
Dear Jan,
 
Tumor markers seem to be done routinely in B.C.  I have yet to have a tumor marker done. Two years after diagnosis and I do not even get routine blood work at my follow-up visits -  
 
Most oncologists and centers feel that they are very unreliable because the change in values can be affected by many things.
 
First, you have to have an established baseline and then you have to watch a trend over more than 3 months to establish 'your pattern'.  Anything under 37 is normal (these values vary from laboratory to laboratory). 
 
There are women that can predict what is going on based on in their bodies by their tumor markers rising just a few points and there are other women with perfectly normal or low normal tumor markers and have their tumors on the move throughout their body!
 
Connie
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote janinvan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 28 2009 at 3:30pm
Connie, thanks for your reply!
My CA 15-3   usually correlates to my condition!
However, other women (it seems with less serious situations)..don't even know about the marker!
BUT I think that expert physical examination follow-ups of the affected area are so important. (or ultrasound/scans if appropriate).
Is there a system in place for certain recommended scans, etc. ?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cwrightrn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 28 2009 at 4:03pm
I haven't heard of the CA 15-3, my Dr drew the Ca 27-29 and its normal is under 40. This tumor marker is more indicative of mets although there are many false positives and some who have mets never have a high reading. Most Dr's may follow the trend of the numbers but some don't even draw tumor markers for breast cancer because they are not as reliable as those for ovarian cancer.
We are a family of FAITH, HOPE and LOVE
DX 2/09 IBC, stage IIIB, 6/15 nodes, TN, BRCA-: 1/10-stage IV, mets to mediastinal nodes, 4/10 skin mets recurrence
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cg--- Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 28 2009 at 4:11pm

What to Know: ASCO's Guideline on Follow-Up Care for Breast Cancer

Recommendations

The purpose of follow-up care for breast cancer is to help maintain good health after treatment, which includes coping with the side effects of treatment, reducing the risk of recurrence (return of the cancer), and watching for signs of recurrence. ASCO's recommendations for breast cancer follow-up care are listed below.

Table. Recommendations for Follow-Up Care for Breast Cancer

Follow-Up Care Test

Recommendation

Medical history and physical examination Visit your doctor every three to six months for the first three years after the first treatment, every six to 12 months for years four and five, and every year thereafter.
Post-treatment mammography Schedule a mammogram one year after your first mammogram that led to diagnosis, but no earlier than six months after radiation therapy. Obtain a mammogram every six to 12 months thereafter.
Breast self-examination Perform a breast self-examination every month. This procedure is not a substitute for a mammogram.
Pelvic examination Continue to visit a gynecologist regularly. Women taking tamoxifen should report any vaginal bleeding to their doctor.
Coordination of care About a year after diagnosis, you may continue to visit your oncologist or transfer your care to a primary care doctor. Women receiving hormone therapy should talk with their oncologist about how often to schedule follow-up visits for re-evaluation of their treatment.
Genetic counseling referral

Tell your doctor if there is a history of cancer in your family. The following risk factors may indicate that breast cancer could run in the family:

  • Ashkenazi Jewish heritage

  • Personal or family history of ovarian cancer

  • Any first-degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) diagnosed with breast cancer before age 50

  • Two or more first-degree or second-degree relatives (grandparent, aunt, uncle) diagnosed with breast cancer

  • Personal or family history of breast cancer in both breasts

  • History of breast cancer in a male relative

Most breast cancer recurrences are discovered by patients between doctor visits. Tell your doctor if you experience the following symptoms:

  • New lumps in the breast

  • Bone pain

  • Chest pain

  • Abdominal pain

  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

  • Persistent headaches

  • Persistent coughing

  • Rash on breast

  • Nipple discharge (liquid coming from the nipple)

The following tests are not currently recommended by ASCO for regular follow-up care because they have not been shown to lengthen the life of a person with breast cancer:

  • A complete blood count (CBC) test and liver and kidney function tests

  • Chest x-ray

  • Bone scan

  • Liver ultrasound

  • Computed tomography (CT or CAT) scan

  • Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron-emission tomography (FDG-PET) scan

  • Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) test

  • Breast cancer tumor markers, such as CA 15-3, CA 27.29, and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Learn more about ASCO’s recommendations for tumor markers for breast cancer.




Last Updated: June 30, 2009

 
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janinvan View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote janinvan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 29 2009 at 12:19pm
Thanks, everyone's terrific....but I'm also referring to the expertise of a physical exam (looking/touching) of the masectomy site in the event of recurrence to the chest wall, etc......(swelling/fullness)
ALSO go to breastcancer.org and add to one of the tnbc posts to blog OPRAH
 
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