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CORONA VIRUS VACCINATION IS IT SAFE?

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Tasoula View Drop Down
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    Posted: Mar 26 2021 at 4:26am
HELLO ALL!
HOPE ALL YOU ARE SAFE!
 I WANTED TO ASK YOU WHAT YOUR ONCOLOGISTS RECOMMENDS IS IT SAFE FOR PEOPLE WHO HAD TRIPLE NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER , IS SAFE TO GET VACCINED OR IS IT DANGEROUS. WONDERING BECAUSE IS NOT ENOUGH TESTED IF FOR SOME REASON IS DANGEROUS FOR ANY CANCER CELLS.

I WILL APPRECIATE YOUR OPINION AND YOUR HELP! I ALWAYS HAVE AND HAD THE BEST SUPPORT EVER HERE AND THANK YOU ALL!!

THANK YOU!!
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123Donna View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 30 2021 at 8:03am

Which COVID-19 vaccine is best for cancer patients?

With three COVID-19 vaccines now authorized for emergency use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), you might be wondering which vaccine is best for current and former cancer patients. After reviewing all available data, MD Anderson medical experts agree that all three vaccines are safe and recommended for cancer patients.

So, should you take Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 vaccine (J&J), which requires only one dose, if that’s what’s available? Or should you wait for one of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, which both require two doses, spaced 21 and 28 days apart, respectively?

According to our experts, the answer is clear: “Don’t pass up an opportunity to get the vaccine, no matter which one it is,” says Anita Ying, M.D., vice president of Ambulatory Medical Operations. “The best COVID-19 vaccine to get is the first one available to you.”



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And survivors, those not undergoing active cancer treatment. Are there any reasons they shouldn’t get vaccinated?

I think that depends on when you ask the question. How much vaccine do you have [available]? If you have unlimited amounts, then everybody should get vaccinated. But when you get into vaccine allocation issues, that’s when it gets challenging.

But there’s no question that many cancer survivors have immunologic deficiencies, so I see many of them as being at high risk. Cancer survivors are also people who tend to be older and have other comorbidities—heart disease, kidney or lung dysfunction—so they’re going to have other reasons that will put them at risk for developing severe COVID-19, and those are all reasons for them to get vaccinated.








DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Amrit Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 05 2021 at 7:49pm
I am currently under AC-T chemo treatment.  I received my 2nd dose of Moderna vaccine last week.  My doctor approved the vaccine for me and I am glad I got it. As far as side effects, they were manageable with Tylenol and some rest. I think the benefits of the vaccine greatly outweigh the concerns of side effects.  However, it is important that we as the patients of breast cancer consult our doctors before we get the vaccine.  And after getting the vaccine, be ready to take rest, if needed, especially, after the second dose.  If any side effects persist or intensify, consult your doctor. I am just writing about my experience as a patient.  I am not a doctor or medical professional.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CloudyNCool Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 14 2021 at 7:56pm
I had two shots of the AstraZeneca vaccine. Both recently and between my chemo infusions. I had no side effects that couldn't be managed with rest and some tylenol. I'm glad I got them. 
6/17 TNBC pT1c Grade 3 Lumpectomy, dose dence AC-P, rads/boosts (55yrs)

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Dear beloved TNBC family,

From what I have read the vaccine is safe but certain oncologists, based on their individual patient's status if currently undergoing treatment, or have very compromised immune systems, have suggested waiting to take the vaccine. For example if a patient's white blood count has plummeted due to chemo some oncologists feel it is better to wait until the levels normalize.

Also, I am actively helping women with breast cancer and at least 10 of them have reported to me, after their second Covid vaccination, a scary inflammation in their axillary lymph nodes. The inflammation, on a scan, is suggestive of cancer and has understandably gotten the women and their loved ones, very concerned but it seems to go away within a few weeks.

But, some women, have had biopsies that were all negative. 

Please, please don't take my words as advice to not have the vaccine. I am not a medical professional and do not give medical advice. I, my wife and all our loved ones who are eligible to get the vaccine have been double vaccinated but there seem to be instances where your oncologist may recommend the vaccine be postponed. Please follow your oncologist's guidance.

with my love to all here,

Steve


I am a BRCA1+ grandson, son and father of women affected by breast/oc-my daughter inherited mutation from me, and at 36, was dx 2004 TNBC I am a volunteer patient advocate with SAGE Patient Advocates
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 15 2021 at 5:43pm
Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine Deemed Safe for Patients Undergoing Cancer Treatment Despite “Lagging” Immune Response in Some Malignancies

Despite some delayed immune responses, the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine appears safe and effective in patients with cancer who are receiving treatment for their disease.

The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine appears to produce a safe and effective immune response in patients with certain cancer types who are undergoing active treatment, although notably some patients with solid malignancies may have delayed immune responses, according to a press release.1

The study compared patients who were undergoing treatment for cancer with non-cancer controls and found a lagging immune response time in some solid tumors, such as colon, breast, and lung cancer. Investigators only focused on the Pfizer 2 dose vaccine and not Moderna, which has a similar composition; investigators are unsure whether it would yield the same response.

“Patients with solid tumors do develop antibodies to the vaccine, but this process is lagging compared with the general population, and one dose is not enough,” study co-author Irit Ben-Aharon, MD, PhD, of the Israel Cancer Research Fund said in the press release.

Investigators caution that patients undergoing treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy should be monitored after receiving the vaccines, as it may potentially cause changes in certain liver enzymes.

This study focused on 232 adult patients undergoing cancer treatment and 220 healthy adults. Following administration of the first dose, patients with cancer had 29% detectable antibodies in the bloodstream compared with 84% in healthy adults.

When patients with cancer received the second dose, the antibodies rose to 86%. Investigators are still monitoring these patients for 6 months to see if their immune response declines or if a booster shot will be needed.

“Based on their findings, however, people undergoing cancer treatment can—and should—receive both doses of the vaccine,” Ben-Aharon continued in the press release.

This study, which began in January 2021 and concluded in March 2021, took place in Israel with randomly enrolled patients who had not previously been infected with the COVID-19 virus. The first dataset was taken more than 10 following the first dose of the vaccine, and the second was collected approximately 14 days after the second dose.2

The cohort of patients receiving cancer treatment was comprised of 172 patients (74%) who had metastatic disease. The most common cancer types included gastrointestinal (27%; n = 63), genitourinary (21%; n = 48), lung (19%; n = 45), and breast cancer (18%; n = 42).

Among patients who were 60 years or older, 30% (n= 26) had positive serologic test results compared with 80% (n= 146) in the control group (P< .001). Seropositive patients had a media titer score of 40.25 compared to the control groups 43.5.

In patients who were 60 years or younger, 27% (n= 7) had positive serologic results (median, 72.5) compared with 94% (n= 94) the control group (median, 74.0). There was no difference when investigators looked at age, sex, or disease stage.

Investigators reported an increase in enzymes by 1.5 times in 24 patients for 6 weeks after the first dose. Patients also reported local reaction (69%), with injection-site warmness (9%), redness (8%), and swelling (4%). The most common adverse effects reported included fatigue (24%), muscle and joint pain (13%), and headache (10%). Only 1% of patients reported a fever.

“This cohort study provides data on use of the SARS-CoV-2 BNT162b2 vaccine in patients with solid tumors who are receiving active anticancer treatments in the real-world setting. Although the immunogenicity pattern was gradual and slower than in the noncancer population, after the second dose most patients were seropositive and no documented cases of COVID-19 infection were determined,” investigators of the study concluded.

References:

1. Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine safe, effective in cancer patients, despite 'lagging' response. News release. UPI. July 8, 2021. Accessed July 9, 2021. https://bit.ly/3AOKPjE

2. Goshen-Lago T, Waldhorn I, Holland R, et al. Serologic status and toxic effects of the SARS-CoV-2 BNT162b2 vaccine in patients undergoing treatment for cancer. Published online ahead of print: July 8, 2021. JAMA Oncol. 2021. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2021.2675

https://www.cancernetwork.com/view/pfizer-covid-19-vaccine-deemed-safe-for-patients-undergoing-cancer-treatment-despite-lagging-immune-response-in-some-malignancies


DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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