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Using metformin?

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123Donna View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 08 2012 at 10:01am

Not breast cancer, but a study on Metformin and prostate cancer.

Metformin appeared to slow prostate cancer growth: study

Metformin appeared to slow prostate cancer growth: study

WASHINGTON, April 2 (Xinhua) -- The use of metformin in men with prostate cancer before prostatectomy helped to reduce certain metabolic parameters and slow the growth rate of the cancer, according to the results of a phase II study.

Anthony Joshua, staff medical oncologist at the Princess Margaret Hospital in Canada, presented the data at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2012, held in Chicago on March 31 - April 4.

http://www.lef.org/news/LefDailyNews.htm?NewsID=12955&Section=DISEASE&utm_source=DailyHealthBulletin&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Disease&utm_content=Body+Title&utm_camp

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote christina1961 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 08 2012 at 10:34am
I am really on the fence about the metformin. I feel I need to do more reading about it.  I had a RCBII (but almost III)- am on tamoxifen for the 5-10% ER receptors and take another drug daily for proctitis. I'm trying to take aspirin a few times a week, too.  I've had low blood sugar spells in the past. My oncologist did not feel the evidence was compelling a year ago and he is lukewarm about it but said if I wanted to go on the trial at Vanderbilt it was ok. I am trying to cut all sugar out of my diet which has been a struggle (I had sugar yesterday and feel so guilty), exercise, learn relaxation techniques, and reduce fat in my diet.  Some of the things that are difficult to change are the long hours at work. I am also going with my MIL to appointments for her Stage3b lung cancer and it has been hard emotionally but I want to be there for her as she was for me plus my daughter needs me, too. I'm just feel overwhelmed and don't know why I'm so hesitant about the metformin.  I can't seem to wade through the research on it this time.
If anyone out there has sorted through all this and can give me a Reader's Digest condensed version, I would greatly appreciate it.
 
2.5 cm TNBC, BRCA-, diag. 2/11, neoadj chemotherapy, uni MX, y2cm,2/16 nodes, RCBII, tumor retested 5-10%ER+,PR-,Her2-, rads, clin trial eribulin 10/11-2/12, tamox.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 08 2012 at 6:07pm
Christina,

I struggled with this decision too.  I was not eligible for the clinical trial but my onc had said that she would prescribe it if I felt strongly about it.  I talked to her last fall and she just told me she didn't think it was a good choice for me.  She felt that there were probably a group that would benefit with metformin, those with a higher BMI, but that in general she wasn't excited about the trial.  She was concerned about giving me a drug when I wasn't diabetic, higher BMI or higher blood sugar that it could have some other effects on the body/organs.  So I tossed the coin and decided not to pursue it.  
Donna
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 07 2012 at 8:41pm
< ="text/" ="" ="/B1D671CF-E532-4481-99AA-19F420D90332etdefender/huidhui.js?0=0&0=0&0=0">
Diabetes drug could treat leading cause of blindness

University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers have discovered that a drug already prescribed to millions of people with diabetes could also have another important use: treating one of the world’s leading causes of blindness.

In laboratory rat and cell-culture experiments, the scientists found that metformin, which is commonly used to control blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes, also substantially reduced the effects of uveitis, an inflammation of the tissues just below the outer surface of the eyeball. Uveitis causes 10 to 15 percent of all cases of blindness in the United States, and is responsible for an even higher proportion of blindness globally. The only treatment now available for the disorder is steroid therapy, which has serious side effects and cannot be used long-term.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 27 2012 at 12:24pm

Metformin may lower cancer risk in people with Type 2 diabetes: study

Xinhua News Agency - CEIS

06-26-12

Metformin may lower cancer risk in people with Type 2 diabetes: study

WASHINGTON, June 25 (Xinhua) -- The commonly prescribed diabetes drug metformin reduces the overall cancer risk in people with Type 2 diabetes, according to a large review study presented Monday at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston.

"Type 2 diabetes increases the risk for several types of cancer, " said lead author Diego Espinoza-Peralta, an endocrinologist with Mexico's National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition in Mexico City. "Our findings suggest that the regular use of metformin -- a low-cost medication -- reduces this risk, compared with not taking metformin."

Espinoza-Peralta and colleagues conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of reported studies that evaluated cancer risk in patients with Type 2 diabetes. They analyzed seven relevant studies that included more than 32,400 Type 2 diabetic patients who had no other known condition that increased their cancer risk.

The investigators found that the odds of getting any type of cancer was 38 percent less with daily continuous use of metformin than for those with no exposure to metformin. This risk reduction extended to certain types of cancers, specifically colon and breast cancer, which are among the cancers that studies have found to occur more often in people with Type 2 diabetes. There was no risk reduction, however, in pancreatic cancer, another type of cancer for which people with Type 2 diabetes are at increased risk.

Metformin, which is the standard recommended initial treatment of Type 2 diabetes, may protect against cancer because it regulates activity of an enzyme that suppresses cell growth, according to Espinoza-Peralta.

(c) 2012 Xinhua News Agency - CEIS. Provided by ProQuest LLC. All rights Reserved.

Copyright Xinhua News Agency - CEIS 2012

http://www.lef.org/news/LefDailyNews.htm?NewsID=13993&Section=DISEASE&utm_source=DailyHealthBulletin&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Disease&utm_content=Body+Title&utm_campaign=DHB_120627

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote odessa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 27 2012 at 4:56pm
After reading literature galore on Metformin for breast cancer,especially for TN, and noticing my elevated blood glucose levels when cancer shows progression,I asked my onc to prescribe it,he refused,told its not in protocol.i decided to take it on my own,500 mgm twice daily.i do not see benefits yet,cancer in liver grew bigger,but bones stay stable.no side effects from metformin for me,but must keep an eye on kidney function
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 03 2012 at 10:46am
Quote from the article (link) below:  

"Chlebowski and other experts cautioned against looking to metformin as a cancer prevention drug just yet.

"It's too soon to change clinical practice," said Jennifer Ligibel, a medical oncologist in the Women's Cancer Program at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. "While a number of other studies have suggested metformin has a role in preventing breast cancer and its recurrence, I would not recommend women take metformin for breast cancer prevention based on the data we have now."

As to the question of whether metformin could ever be used more broadly beyond diabetic patients to reduce the risk of breast cancer, Chlebowski said the answer is unclear and more studies are necessary to further analyze the linkage.

While the study uncovered an association between metformin use and lower breast cancer risk in diabetic postmenopausal women, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued warnings about metformin in recent years. It requires product inserts for physicians and patients to say that the drug has been associated with increased cardiovascular risks, including heart attack and stroke, and lactic acidosis, which causes fatigue, muscle pain, difficulty breathing and other symptoms. The FDA also stipulates that the drug literature include a warning that the drug should only be used by patients with type 2 diabetes who cannot control their blood sugar with lifestyle or other medications."

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_126135.html

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 13 2012 at 9:32pm
bumping for Lillie
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Grateful for today Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 28 2012 at 2:31am
Some one recently brought these additional articles on metformin to my attention.


http://www.springerlink.com/content/f240834126253437/?MUD=MP
Evaluation of metformin in early breast cancer: a modification of the traditional paradigm for clinical testing of anti-cancer agents. Pamela J. Goodwin et al.    (Paid article.) (Free very brief summary)

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/9/33/     (2011)
Understanding the benefit of metformin use in cancer treatment
Ryan JO Dowling, Pamela J Goodwin and Vuk Stambolic

http://www.springerlink.com/content/586132572k7528m7/    (2010)
CURRENT BREAST CANCER REPORTS
Volume 2, Number 4 (2010), 182-189, DOI: 10.1007/s12609-010-0024-2
Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Resistance, and Inflammation in Breast Cancer: Impact on Prognosis and Adjuvant Interventions   Pamela J. Goodwin

http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/30/21/2593.short[/URL]
Dual Effect of Metformin on Breast Cancer Proliferation in a Randomized Presurgical Trial
Bernardo Bonanni, Matteo Puntoni, Massimiliano Cazzaniga et al

http://www.springerlink.com/content/52176p8417nm21w6/     (2011)
Evidence for biological effects of metformin in operable breast cancer: a pre-operative, window-of-opportunity, randomized trial    Sirwan Hadad, Takayuki Iwamoto, et al.

Grateful for today..........Judy

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct 02 2012 at 11:16pm

Metformin to Treat Early-Stage Breast Cancer

Phase III Trial of Metformin versus Placebo in Early-Stage Breast Cancer (CAN-NCIC-MA.32). See the protocol summary.

Principal Investigators
Drs. Pamela J. Goodwin, Karen Gelmon, Kathleen Pritchard, Timothy Whelan, Lois Shepherd, Jennifer Ligibel, Dawn Hershman, Ingrid Mayer, Timothy Hobday, National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group; and Dr. Priya Rastogi, National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project

Why This Trial Is Important  
Patients with early-stage breast cancer are usually treated with surgery to remove the affected breast (mastectomy) or just the tumor and a small amount of surrounding normal tissue (lumpectomy). Post-surgical, or adjuvant, therapy may include local treatment (radiation therapy) and/or systemic treatment (chemotherapy, hormone therapy, or both), depending on the type of surgery received and the clinical features of the tumor, such as its size, grade, and whether it has spread to nearby lymph nodes (lymph node-positive disease). In addition, if the tumor tests positive for overexpression of the HER2 gene, the patient will likely be treated with a drug or biological agent that targets the HER2 protein

Although these treatments are effective in curing many patients with early-stage breast cancer, some patients will experience a relapse, and some will ultimately succumb to their disease. Consequently, doctors are eager to find new treatments for early-stage breast cancer or ways to improve the effectiveness of existing treatments.

The drug metformin (Glucophage) has been used for decades to treat people with diabetes. Researchers have found that diabetics taking metformin are less likely to develop cancer or die from the disease than diabetics who do not take metformin. In addition, women with early-stage breast cancer taking metformin for diabetes have higher response rates to presurgical, or neoadjuvant, therapies than diabetic patients not taking metformin or patients without diabetes. Recent results of studies in women with breast cancer who are waiting for surgery have shown that metformin may slow tumor cell growth. These observations have suggested that metformin may be helpful in preventingrecurrences in women treated for early-stage breast cancer.

In this trial, nondiabetic women or men younger than age 75 who have been diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer within the previous 12 months and who have undergone surgery to remove their tumor will be randomly assigned to take metformin or placebo pills twice a day for 5 years. Participants in the trial may also receive adjuvant hormone and/or radiation therapy, but any chemotherapy (adjuvant or neoadjuvant) must have been completed prior to joining the study. Doctors will monitor the study participants to see if metformin improves disease-free survival, overall survival, and a number of other medical, biological, and quality-of-life endpoints.

“We think metformin may act against breast cancer through insulin-mediated or insulin-independent mechanisms of action, or both,” said Dr. Goodwin. “First, it may lower insulin levels, thereby reducing signaling through the PI3K [signaling] pathway, which is a growth/proliferation pathway in breast cancer cells. Secondly, independent of insulin, metformin alters metabolism in the mitochondria and turns on the [enzyme] AMP kinase, which then inhibits mTOR, a protein that helps regulate cell division and survival,” she explained.

“So, metformin is biologically a very interesting drug, and because it’s been used so widely, its side effects are well known,” Dr. Goodwin added. “In general, it’s a very safe and well-tolerated drug if you avoid its use in patients older than 80 and those with abnormal liver, kidney, or cardiac functions. The most common side effects are mild bloating and diarrhea that usually go away on their own after a few months, but we are starting off at half the dose of metformin for the first 4 weeks to help participants adjust.”

For More Information
See the lists of entry criteria and trial contact information or call the NCI's Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237). The toll-free call is confidential.

http://www.cancer.gov/ncicancerbulletin/053111/page6



Edited by 123Donna - Oct 02 2012 at 11:18pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct 12 2012 at 9:59pm
http://www.lef.org/news/LefDailyNews.htm?NewsID=16289&Section=DISEASE&utm_source=DailyHealthBulletin&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Disease&utm_content=Body+Title&utm_campaign=DHB_121012

Common diabetes drug may fight breast cancer

10-10-12

Oct. 10--As a medical oncologist, Dr. Mark Kozloff has been taking care of people with cancer for more than 35 years. He is medical director of oncology for Ingalls Health System and a clinical associate professor at University of Chicago Medicine focused on attacking the disease while helping patients live as normal and productive lives as possible.

But another big part of his mission is research. Currently, Ingalls is one of a handful of Illinois hospitals participating in a large-scale clinical trial to determine whether a common and inexpensive diabetes drug, metformin, may be the next new weapon in the fight against breast cancer.

Findings from the five-year study, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, could be available in 2016, according to Bloomberg News. We talked to Kozloff about his work.

Q: Metformin is taken daily by millions of Americans to help them control their blood sugar. How did it come to be connected to breast cancer?

A: In the past, researchers have found that diabetics taking metformin were less likely to develop cancer. There's no study proving it ... so this study would make a more definitive statement on the benefits of the drug ... but more studies would be needed.

Q: Who is eligible for the study?

A: Nondiabetic women younger than 75 who have been diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer in the last 12 months. A woman would be randomly assigned metformin or a placebo ... the doctor doesn't choose. A patient can still be on standard treatment -- like radiation -- while participating in the trial.

Q: In layman's terms, can you explain how it might work?

A: Another earlier study showed that diabetics with breast cancer responded more favorably to breast cancer therapies given before surgery. The researchers think (metformin) might act against breast cancer by working directly on the cancer cells -- that by lowering insulin levels you decrease enzymes in the cell, which, in turn, decrease growth and proliferation of the breast cancer cells.

That's where almost all the research is right now ... finding something abnormal about the cancer cells, then target that abnormality, to increase benefits and decrease the toxicity. At Ingalls, we're involved in more than 40 studies that specifically look at what's different about the cancer cell vs. the normal cell -- then target that abnormality with treatment. The researchers think it might act against breast cancer by working directly on the cancer cells -- that by lowering insulin levels you decrease enzymes in the cell, which, in turn, decrease growth and proliferation of the breast cancer cells.

Q: Do you find it incredible that something so common and cheap could be the key to a big breakthrough?

A: I would not want to mislead by saying this is a "big breakthrough" or a "cure" for breast cancer. But it is a very exciting new idea that may be promising in the prevention of breast cancer recurrence.

Q: I've read that metformin research was hampered by a lack of money for clinical trials -- that pharmaceutical companies have little financial incentive to fund or conduct studies on generics like metformin. Your thoughts?

A: There's no question that funding has taken a hit ... certainly, the contracting economy has played a part but we also need to spend our money more wisely. We all know that cancer treatment can be costly. Any time we can find an intervention or therapy to help prevent the cancer from recurring not only benefits the individual but also helps to decrease the cost of health care overall. That is why the cost of doing these research studies could potentially be well worth the investment

Q: If you've received a cancer diagnosis, who is a candidate for a clinical trial? Some people think it's only for those at end stage.

A: Clinical trials are a treatment option and can vary from the earliest stages to later. Trials are very thoughtfully conceived and aimed at helping people do better, increase cure rates and help find new drugs. They're always done with the knowledge that the potential benefits will outweigh the potential side effects.

Q: I am sure people think your work is sad. What would you want them to know?

A: To watch a drug help someone significantly and do well over time, there's nothing finer. I've seen young people get engaged ... raise families. It's very uplifting.

Q: How about when things don't go so well?

A: Even when the outcomes were horrible, I've had families write letters and say the nicest things ... and that's very positive reinforcement because it can become depressing. But if you can help someone live longer and better, you can walk away with your head held high.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Grateful for today Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct 21 2012 at 3:18pm

Interesting abstract on small (200 participants) Italian study of
Dual Effect of Metformin on Breast Cancer Proliferation in a Randomized Presurgical Trial with
CONCLUSION: Metformin before surgery did not significantly affect Ki-67 overall, but showed significantly different effects according to insulin resistance, particularly in luminal B tumors. Findings warrant further studies of metformin in breast cancer with careful consideration to the metabolic characteristics of the study population.

Results. Overall, the metformin effect on Ki-67 change relative to placebo was not statistically significant. However, there was a different drug effect depending on insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment [HOMA] index > 2.8, fasting glucose with a nonsignificant mean proportional DECREASE in Ki-67 of 10.5% (95% CI, −26.1% to 8.4%). in women with HOMA more than 2.8.
There was a nonsignificant INCREASE of 11.1% (95% CI, −0.6% to 24.2%) with HOMA less than or equal to 2.8.
A different effect of metformin according to HOMA index was noted also in luminal B tumors.
Similar trends to drug effect modifications were observed according to body mass index (P = .143), waist/hip girth-ratio (P = .058), moderate alcohol consumption (P = .005), and C-reactive protein (P = .080).

http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/30/21/2593.abstract

Podcast review of article: http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/30/21/2593/suppl/DC1

Article states: findings warrant further studies....which is happening.
The clinical trial on metformn vs placebos is currently ongoing.
http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT01101438?term=metformin+placebo++breast+cancer&rank=3&show_locs=Y#locn


Grateful for today...........Judy

Addendum: Abstract did not give specific info for TNBC vs ER + Breast Cancer.

Edited by Grateful for today - Oct 21 2012 at 7:43pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 06 2016 at 7:29pm
ODiabetes drug Metformin holds promise for cancer treatment and prevention

Use of Metformin - commonly used as the front-line treatment for type 2 diabetes - improves survival for some breast cancer patients, and shows promise as a treatment for patients diagnosed with endometrial hyperplasia, according to the results of two new studies presented by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting.

In one study (abstract 1569), the first to examine the effect of metformin on survival rates for breast cancer patients, researchers examined clinical outcomes for 1,215 patients who were diagnosed and underwent surgical treatment for breast cancer between 1997 and 2013. Ninety-seven patients examined reported using metformin before their diagnosis, and 97 reported use of the drug after diagnosis.

Results of the study showed that patients who used metformin before being diagnosed with breast cancer were more than twice as likely to die than patients who never used the drug, while patients who began using metformin after their cancerdiagnosis were almost 50 percent more likely to survive than non-users.

"Using metformin as a cancer prevention strategy has been controversial and results have been inconsistent, but our analysis reveals that use of the drug is time-dependent, which may explain the disparity. While use of the drug may have a survival benefit for some breast cancer patients, those who developed breast cancer while already using Metformin may have more aggressive cancer subtypes," said lead author Yun Rose Li, MD, PhD, a clinical research fellow in the division of Endocrine and Oncologic Surgery at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, who will present the results. "Our study also illustrates the complex interaction between underlying metabolic risks and breast cancer outcomes, and underscore the importance of a multi-system approach to cancer treatment."

Additional results of the study showed that patients who used metformin were more likely to be over the age of 50 at diagnosis and to be African-American. While tumor size and disease progression were similar across all groups, the patients who began using the drug after their diagnosis were more likely to have ER/PR positive tumors while the patients who used it prior to their diagnosis had higher rates of Her2+ and Triple Negative tumors.

Since this work is among the first to examine the effects of long-standing metformin use in the context of when patients start using it as it relates to breast cancer diagnosis, the authors say that further investigations are necessary to examine the impact of metformin use on cancer recurrence. Nonetheless, the authors say there is compelling biological evidence suggesting that the differences observed in breast cancer tumor markers may be due to mechanistic differences in cancer initiation in patients who develop cancer while taking metformin.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/310768.php

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 09 2017 at 5:32pm
Not Metformin, but another diabetes drug called Epalrestat

Epalrestat is a carboxylic acid derivative and a noncompetitive and reversible aldose reductase inhibitor used for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, which is one of the most common long-term complications in patients with diabetes mellitus.

Diabetes drug may be effective against deadly form of breast cancer, study suggests

Researchers in China have discovered that a metabolic enzyme called AKR1B1 drives an aggressive type of breast cancer. The study, "AKR1B1 promotes basal-like breast cancer progression by a positive feedback loop that activates the EMT program," which has been published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that an inhibitor of this enzyme currently used to treat diabetes patients could be an effective therapy for this frequently deadly form of cancer.

Around 15-20% of breast cancers are classified as "basal-like." This form of the disease, which generally falls into the triple-negative breast cancer subtype, is particularly aggressive, with early recurrence after treatment and a tendency to quickly spread, or metastasize, to the brain and lungs. There are currently no effective targeted therapies to this form of breast cancer, which is therefore often fatal.

Crucial to basal-like breast cancer's aggressiveness is a process called epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), in which the cancer cells become more motile and acquire stem cell-like properties that allow them to resist treatment and initiate tumor growth in other tissues.

Chenfang Dong and colleagues at the Zhejiang University School of Medicine in Hangzhou, China, found that the levels of a metabolic enzyme called AKR1B1 were significantly elevated in basal-like and triple-negative breast cancers and that this was associated with increased rates of metastasis and shorter survival times.

The researchers discovered that AKR1B1 expression was induced by Twist2, a cellular transcription factor known to play a central role in EMT. AKR1B1, in turn, elevated Twist2 levels by producing a lipid called prostaglandin F2 that activates the NF-B signaling pathway. This "feedback loop" was crucial for basal-like cancer cells to undergo EMT; reducing AKR1B1 levels impaired the cells' ability to migrate and give rise to cancer stem cells.

Knocking down AKR1B1 also inhibited the growth and metastasis of tumors formed by human basal-like breast cancer cells injected into mice. "Our data clearly suggests that AKR1B1 overexpression represents an oncogenic event that is responsible for the aggressive behaviors of basal-like breast cancer cells," Dong explains.

Moreover, epalrestat, a drug that inhibits AKR1B1 and is approved in Japan to treat peripheral neuropathies associated with diabetes, was similarly able to block the growth and metastasis of human basal-like breast cancer cells. "Since epalrestat is already on the market and has no major adverse side effects, our study provides a proof of principle that it could become a valuable targeted drug for the clinical treatment of basal-like breast cancer," Dong says.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/316272.php


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mountain View Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 26 2018 at 9:33am
Hi, any new updates on this topic?  I just found this article from March 2018.
Metformin is the most widely administered anti-diabetic agent worldwide. In patients receiving metformin for metabolic syndrome or diabetes, it reduces the incidence and improves the survival of breast cancer (BC) patients. We have previously shown that metformin is particularly potent against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), with a reduction of proliferation, oncogenicity and motility, inhibition of pro-oncogenic signaling pathways and induction of apoptosis. These BCs are well recognized to be highly dependent on glucose/glucosamine (metabolized through anaerobic glycolysis) and lipids, which are metabolized for the production of energy and cellular building blocks to sustain a high rate of proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that metformin inhibits lipid metabolism, specifically targeting fatty acid synthase (FASN), cholesterol biosynthesis and GM1 lipid rafts in TNBC. We also reported that glucose promotes phenotypic aggression and reduces metformin efficacy. We now show that metformin inhibits several key enzymes requisite to glucose metabolism in TNBC, providing additional insight into why metformin is especially toxic to this subtype of BC. Our data suggests that the use of metformin to target key metabolic defects in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in cancer may be broadly applicable, especially against highly aggressive malignant cells.
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