New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Vitamin D3
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Vitamin D3

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123 45>
Author
 Rating: Topic Rating: 1 Votes, Average 5.00  Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options
Kellyless View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: Jun 18 2009
Location: Dallas, Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 977
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kellyless Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Vitamin D3
    Posted: Jan 27 2019 at 8:30am
Little follow up: my insurance denied payment for the vitamin D test Angry my doctor dealt with it, probably sent one of these articles Donna has posted. Just infuriating tho!! If my oncologist had ordered it they wouldn't have kicked it back i bet. They said they wouldn't pay for the breast MRI I had that found my tumor last time. When the biopsy came back positive they sent me a letter, "upon further review, we will cover your recent MRI". Health insurance should not be a for profit business! They make money by denying life saving tests and care. I suppose women that haven't had cancer are denied Vitamin tests - where finding deficiencies may prevent diseases like ours in some people? Evil. 

Edited by Kellyless - Jan 27 2019 at 8:31am
IDC, 2.2 cm, Stage IIb,lumpectomy 1/30/09 ACx4,Tx4 36 rads
6/1/16 Local recurrence same breast, same spot 1.8cm Carb.4x every 3 wks, Taxol 12x once wk. Dbl Mast. PCR!! Reconstruction fail, NED!
Back to Top
123Donna View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 24 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 12994
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 26 2019 at 11:24am

Does Vitamin D Have a Role in Cancer Prevention?

Cancer Network: What do we know about how much vitamin D we require for optimal health including reducing the risk of cancers?

Dr. Holick: That’s a very good question and obviously, there continues to be a lot of debate about this question. From my perspective, we should really ask the question ‘what were our hunter, gatherer forefathers doing?’ They were always exposed to sunlight. What were their likely levels? How much vitamin D would you require to attain those levels?

One of the insights was done several years ago where a study was performed in Maasai herders that live in Kenya at the equator. Even though they have extremely dark skin, Mother Nature still has the ability to make some vitamin D in their skin.

Their blood levels were measured and it was determined that their 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels were around 40–50 nanograms per milliliter. To get to that level, adults would need to take 3,000–5,000 units of vitamin D per day.

The recommendation from the Endocrine Society practice guidelines is at least 1,500–2,000 units per day and if you are obese, you need two to three times more. I personally take 5,000 units of vitamin D every day and my blood level is in the range of 60 nanograms per milliliter. All of my patients are on between 3,000–5,000 units of vitamin D per day and they are all doing very well.

Cancer Network: Let’s start with colon cancer. There have been numerous epidemiological studies on the possible benefit of vitamin D in preventing colon cancer. What do individual studies and meta-analyses tell us about vitamin D and colon cancer risk?

Dr. Holick: There continues to be association data saying that the higher your 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels are, the lower your risk for colorectal cancer.

The earliest study was done by the Garland brothers back in the 1990s when they were relating latitude and colon cancer and then did a prospective study on vitamin D status and the risk of colon cancer.

They concluded two things. The first is that the higher latitude that you live, the higher your risk for colorectal cancer. They also concluded that taking 1,000 units of vitamin D a day could potentially reduce your risk of colon cancer by as much as 50%. Other studies have suggested that improving your vitamin D status would have the benefit of reducing colorectal cancer by about 25%–50%, depending on the study.

Cancer Network: Is there evidence from studies that vitamin D can mitigate the risk of other tumor types?

Dr. Holick: The one that is most significant concerns breast cancer. There was a very nice study was done from the Nurses’ Health Study that showed that nurses that had, on average, blood levels of 48 nanograms per milliliter, so around 50 nanograms per milliliter—that would require you to take about 3,000–5,000 units of vitamin D per day—reduced their risk of developing breast cancer by about 50%.

There was also a very nice study done by Dr. Knight in Canada. She asked a question on the phone to women living in Canada who had breast cancer and asked the same number of women living in the same area who did not have breast cancer and concluded that women who had the most sun exposure as teenagers and young adults reduced the risk of developing breast cancer later in life by almost 70%. So, there is a reasonable amount of evidence to suggest that improvement in vitamin D status can help reduce the risk of breast cancer.

Cancer Network: Have there been randomized trials with vitamin D that focused on cancer prevention or slowing cancer progression?

Dr. Holick: There was a recent study that came out, known as the VITAL study.  The authors concluded that 5 years on 2,000 IU’s of vitamin D per day that did not reduce the risk for developing colon cancer. But, they did find statistically significant 25% reduced risk of dying from colon cancer if patients took vitamin D.

When you look at that study carefully, most of the subjects were not vitamin D deficient.  If they are vitamin D sufficient already, and getting some additional vitamin D, it is not clear that you would be able to see a significant benefit.

The senior author on the publication, Dr. JoAnn Manson, even made the conclusion that it is also true that these types of cancers probably take more than a few years to develop, so introducing vitamin D for 5 years may not be a long enough time to see benefits. That is all the more reason why I encourage my family and my patients that you should always be vigilant about your vitamin D status and take an adequate amount of vitamin D from birth until death.

Cancer Network: Are there currently ongoing human studies to better understand the potential role of vitamin D in cancer prevention?

Dr. Holick: There continue to be small studies that have concluded that there may or may not be any benefit. Again, you have to look at how these trials are designed and what their outcome measures are. I think it is still not clear that maintaining a blood level that we would consider to be in a healthy range for 25-hydroxy-vitamin D of 40–60 nanograms per milliliter as recommended by the Endocrine Society does have that additional health benefit of reducing risk of many deadly cancers. From my perspective, based on all of the information that I have reviewed, I think overall, the data is suggestive that it does help reduce the risk of deadly cancers.

http://www.cancernetwork.com/cancer-management/does-vitamin-d-have-role-cancer-prevention

DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

Back to Top
123Donna View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 24 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 12994
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 16 2018 at 1:03pm
Hi Kelly,

Personally, I would shoot for something above 50.  My new primary likes the numbers to be at least 70.  I know there is not a general consensus as to what is the ideal number or range and it's so wide.  I take a multivitamin and 5,000 IUs of Vitamin D a day.  This dose helps me get in the upper 50's to mid-60 range.  Hope this information helps. 

Here's a good article to review:

DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

Back to Top
Natalie View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Nov 11 2011
Location: Bay Shore NY
Status: Offline
Points: 473
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Natalie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 16 2018 at 9:29am
Hi Kelly,
ME personally I like a cushion, I personally like to be at about 50. Since the range is so wide then why not is in my mind.
My doctor was happy at 40, I told him I am pushing for 50 or 60... he smiled.
TNBC stage1 size 1.8, grade3 no nodes 4/11 Lumpectomy 5/11 4cycles DD A/C 4cycles DD Taxol. Double Mastectomy 12/11 BRCA all neg
Back to Top
Kellyless View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: Jun 18 2009
Location: Dallas, Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 977
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kellyless Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 16 2018 at 9:24am
In anticipation of a yearly visit with my GP next week, I had comprehensive blood work done this week. I just got the Vitamin D result - 35 ng/ml. It shows 30-80 as being "normal". Considering my history, is that high enough for me? Donna! Would you take supplements if this was your number? I don't know my GP well at all, I see specialists for the most everything, so I'd like to go in understanding what I can. All my other test results are dandy :) so nice to see strong numbers under WBC, RBC, platelets and liver function since they were all dreadful just 2 years ago when I finished chemo.
IDC, 2.2 cm, Stage IIb,lumpectomy 1/30/09 ACx4,Tx4 36 rads
6/1/16 Local recurrence same breast, same spot 1.8cm Carb.4x every 3 wks, Taxol 12x once wk. Dbl Mast. PCR!! Reconstruction fail, NED!
Back to Top
123Donna View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 24 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 12994
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 19 2018 at 7:07pm

'Vitamin D may stop cancer cell growth'

These participants consisted of two groups of women: 209 diagosed with breast cancer, plus 418 cancer-free women who acted as the control group. All the participants had to have stopped menstruating for at least 12 months.

Comparing the medical information collected from the two groups of women, the researchers note that, at the time of diagnosis, the women with breast cancer had higher rates of low or very low serum (blood) vitamin D, compared with their cancer-free counterparts.


"Vitamin D may play a role in controlling breast cancer cells or stopping them from growing. Vitamin D comes from direct sunlight exposure, vitamin D-3 supplements, or foods rich in vitamin D."

To read the entire article:


DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

Back to Top
123Donna View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 24 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 12994
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 05 2018 at 11:28pm

Vitamin D: Recent research uncovers new benefits

Vitamin D and cancer

Breast cancer and bowel cancer have both been linked with cases of vitamin D deficiency in recent studies. One of these analyzed data from two randomized clinical trials and a prospective cohort study.

The researchers found that high levels of vitamin D were inversely associated with risk of breast cancer among women who were cancer-free at baseline.

Studies suggest that vitamin D impacts breast cancer risk.

According to the study results, the higher the levels of vitamin D, the lower the risk of breast cancer.

This relationship remained significant even after the results were adjusted for confounding factors, such as age, body mass index (BMI), intake of calcium supplements, and smoking habits.

Although a link between vitamin D deficiency and colorectal cancer has previously been reported, not all studies have been able to replicate these findings. A new, large-scale study attempted to settle this by drawing on data from three continents, including 5,700 colorectal cancer cases and 7,100 controls.

The researchers alculated that people whose levels of vitamin D fall below those specified in the current guidelines have a 31 percent increased risk of developing bowel cancer. By contrast, those with vitamin D levels above the current recommended levels were 22 percent less likely to develop this cancer.




Edited by 123Donna - Aug 05 2018 at 11:28pm
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

Back to Top
123Donna View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 24 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 12994
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 16 2018 at 6:43pm

Women with higher vitamin D blood levels have lower risk for breast cancer

Results from a new study published today in PLOS ONE shows women who have higher vitamin D blood levels have a significantly lower risk for breast cancer.

DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

Back to Top
123Donna View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 24 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 12994
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 20 2018 at 7:30pm

Is vitamin D deficiency to blame for lung disease?


The researchers found that those with low, or even intermediate, levels of vitamin D had a higher risk of showing early signs of Interstitual Lung Disease (ILD).

"We knew that the activated vitamin D hormone has anti-inflammatory properties and helps regulate the immune system, which goes awry in ILD," explains Dr. Michos.

"There was also evidence in the literature that vitamin D plays a role in obstructive lung diseases such as asthma and [chronic obstructive pulmonary disease]," she adds, "and we now found that the association exists with this scarring form of lung disease too."

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322206.php

DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

Back to Top
123Donna View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 24 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 12994
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 18 2018 at 7:45pm

Vitamin D may decrease breast cancer risk, study reports

Vitamin D is hailed as a wonder nutrient, capable of lowering a person's risk of different forms of cancer. Recent research now confirms that people with high enough levels of this vitamin in their blood have a significantly lower risk of breast cancer.

The merits of vitamin D when it comes to cancer prevention have long been at the heart of medical debates.

Where some studies have revealed that overall cancer risk is lower in people with higher levels of this vitamin, others have suggested that vitamin D has no impact on a person's vulnerability to the disease.

Still, the case for ensuring that you get enough vitamin D is fairly strong, as low blood levels of this nutrient have been associated with a raised risk of bladder cancer and, in a study that was published earlier this year, an elevated risk of bowel cancer.

Previous research has also suggested a link between high vitamin D levels and better survival rates in people going through breast cancer treatment.

In a pooled analysis of a prospective cohort study and two randomized clinical trials, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine in have now investigated whether and to what extent high levels of vitamin D in the blood were associated with a lower risk of developing breast cancer.

Their analysis — which was conducted in collaboration with specialists from Creighton University in Omaha, NE, the Medical University of South Carolina in Columbia, and the nonprofit organization GrassrootsHealth in Encinitas, CA — suggests that certain levels of vitamin D correlate with a "markedly lower" risk of breast cancer.

These results are now published in the journal PLOS ONE.

The analysis revealed that people with higher blood concentrations of the vitamin D biomarker were exposed to a significantly lower risk of breast cancer.

"We found that participants with blood levels of 25(OH)D that were above 60 nanograms per milliliter (ng/ml) had one-fifth the risk of breast cancer compared to those with less than 20 ng/ml."

Cedric F. Garland

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322177.php

DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

Back to Top
cheeks View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Jan 14 2011
Location: North Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 662
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cheeks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 12 2018 at 10:23am
Interesting studies thanks Donna.
Mine was also low the first time at 17, i think. At my next endocrinologist appointment I’m going to talk to him about all this stuff. He’s treating me for diabetes, high cholesterol and triglycerides which by the way are at great levels now. We haven’t addressed my vitamin d or my high blood calcium levels. My family doctor has been keeping an eye on those things as well as my oncologist.

Blair
Lump found 11/08
DX: 2/09 @52 TNBC
L. Mast. 3/26/09, SN-, BRCA-,
4.5 cm (post surgical)T2NOMO
Chemo: 4/09-10/09 Taxol x 12,
A/C x 4, No rad.No recon. NED 1/17. New Primary right breast TN, 2/2018.
Back to Top
123Donna View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 24 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 12994
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 11 2018 at 10:33pm

Vitamin D may protect against cancer

Researchers provide further evidence that vitamin D may protect against cancer, after finding that people from Japan had a lower risk of the disease when they had higher levels of the "sunshine vitamin."


DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

Back to Top
123Donna View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 24 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 12994
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 11 2018 at 10:29pm
Blair, 

Interesting thought.  Most diagnosed with TNBC are grade 3.  

When diagnosed and after finishing chemo I found out my levels were 19 (deficiant).  Over the years I've gotten my levels up, but lately they are in the upper 40's.  My new thyroid doctor ran a series of blood test and told me they want my Vitamin D level to be above 70.  Going to look into this.



  
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

Back to Top
cheeks View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Jan 14 2011
Location: North Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 662
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cheeks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 08 2018 at 8:54pm
Maybe a strange thing to wonder but i just had a thought. I have taken 5000 a day D3 since my last diagnosis because that is what it took to keep my level around 45. They checked it with this new diagnosis and it was still 45 but my grade is 2 instead of 3 like last time. Anyone have an idea if this could have helped to have a little less aggressive tumor?

Blair
Lump found 11/08
DX: 2/09 @52 TNBC
L. Mast. 3/26/09, SN-, BRCA-,
4.5 cm (post surgical)T2NOMO
Chemo: 4/09-10/09 Taxol x 12,
A/C x 4, No rad.No recon. NED 1/17. New Primary right breast TN, 2/2018.
Back to Top
123Donna View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 24 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 12994
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 08 2018 at 7:02pm

Vitamin D may protect against cancer

Researchers provide further evidence that vitamin D may protect against cancer, after finding that people from Japan had a lower risk of the disease when they had higher levels of the "sunshine vitamin."

DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

Back to Top
123Donna View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 24 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 12994
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 01 2018 at 9:29pm
Bumping for our new members.  

It's good to know your Vitamin D level.  If you don't know, please ask your primary or other doctors to test your level.  Lots of good information in this thread if you want to read from the beginning.




Edited by 123Donna - Mar 01 2018 at 9:29pm
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

Back to Top
Motherofall6 View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie
Avatar

Joined: Nov 05 2017
Location: Ohio
Status: Offline
Points: 8
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Motherofall6 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 26 2017 at 10:50am
Had my rheumatologist run my vitamin d3 level and it came back 42 ng , I currently take 2000 iu daily so I’m going to add an additional 1000iu for a daily tot.a of 3000 iu and see if I can bump my number up past 50
diagnosed 10/27/2017
triple negative breast cancer
stage 1 grade 3
lumpectomy 11/10/2017
radiation
chemo 1/3/2018
A/C x4 then taxol x 12
Back to Top
123Donna View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 24 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 12994
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct 26 2017 at 7:11pm

Researchers discover vitamin D deficiency negatively impacts breast cancer prognosis

The pathology of breast cancer is still unknown, but there are several risk factors that have been associated with this disease. These risk factors include, but are not limited to, age, start of menopause, hormone therapy, family history and oral contraceptive use. Additionally, past research has linked breast cancer risk and survival rates to vitamin D status. However, there has been limited research evaluating the relationship between vitamin D status and prognosis of breast cancer. Therefore, researchers from this study evaluated the effect of vitamin D status on severity of cancer prognosis in a high-risk group of postmenopausal women.

A total of 192 postmenopausal Brazilian women between the ages of 45 and 75 were included in this cross-sectional study. All of the participants attended the Breast Disease Assessment Center of the University Hospital in Southeastern Brazil during 2015-2016. The researchers collected the following data: age, menopausal age, time since menopause, age of first gestation, duration of breastfeeding, current smoking, prior use of hormone therapy, history of chronic diseases, family history of breast cancer and use of medications.

They also measured the patient’s anthropometric data and serum vitamin D levels just following breast cancer diagnosis and prior to medical treatment. Due to the fact that breast cancer prognosis is widely variable, the researchers evaluated several markers that contribute to disease outcome, including:

  • Tumor grade: (1) well differentiated, (2) moderately differentiated, and (3) undifferentiated. While grade 1 tumor cells may look similar to surrounding healthy cells, grade 3 tumors are undifferentiated, or made up of only cancerous cells. This indicates disease progression.
  • Tumor stage: measured by a scale of 1-3; (1) localized invasive breast cancer, (2) inoperable locally advanced invasive breast cancer, and (3) metastatic disease. While localized breast cancer remains within the affected body tissues, metastatic cancer migrates to other parts of the body.
  • Lymph node presence: positive if at least one lymph node were identified as having breast cancer metastasis. This means that the cancer has spread beyond the breast tissue to the rest of the body.
  • Hormone-receptor status: presence or absence of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and cell proliferation index (Ki-67) status. Positive scores for ER and PR receptors mean that the cancer cells will grow in response to estrogen or progesterone, while positive scores for HER2 and Ki-67 indicate increased tumor growth.

This is what the researchers found:

  • Average vitamin D status was 25.8 ng/ml (64.5 nmol/l).
  • Of the total participants, 33.9% were considered to be vitamin D sufficient (>30 ng/ml; >75 nmol/l), 47.9% were considered insufficient (20-30 ng/ml; 50-75 nmol/l) and 18.2% were considered vitamin D deficient (<20 ng/ml; 50 nmol/l).
  • Insufficient and deficient 25(OH)D levels were associated with increased tumor grade, locally advanced and metastatic disease, more positive lymph nodes, a lower proportion of ER, PR-positive tumors and higher Ki-67 indices.
  • Vitamin D status was not significantly associated with tumor size, histology of breast cancer or HER2 status.

The researchers concluded:

“In conclusion, in Brazilian postmenopausal women with breast cancer, there was an association between vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency and tumors with worse prognostic features. Low vitamin D levels were shown to be a risk factor for estrogen receptor-negative tumors, positive axillary lymph node status and a higher rate of cell proliferation.”

https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/researchers-discover-vitamin-d-deficiency-negatively-impacts-breast-cancer-prognosis/




Edited by 123Donna - Oct 26 2017 at 7:15pm
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

Back to Top
123Donna View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 24 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 12994
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 23 2017 at 9:02pm
Vitamin D and Calcium Supplementation Reduces Cancer Risk

Researchers recently presented groundbreaking findings that vitamin D reduces the risk of all cancers at the American Public Health Association’s Annual Meeting. The randomized controlled trial (RCT) was the first to evaluate the effects of vitamin D supplementation on cancer as the primary outcome.

These results have arrived with much anticipation due to the consistent evidence suggesting that higher vitamin D levels and increased sun exposure are linked to lower cancer risk. In fact, over 15 types of cancer have been associated with low sun exposure.

Animal studies have proposed various mechanisms to explain these associations. For instance, vitamin D has been shown to promote cellular differentiation, decrease cancer cell growth, stimulate cell death and decrease tumor blood vessel formation in studies of cancer cell and tumors in mice.

Now, the gold standard of research, a randomized controlled trial, has investigated the direct effects of vitamin D on cancer, and it followed a near flawless study design:

  • Large sample population: The study included 2,302 healthy menopausal women ages 55 and older.
  • Long duration: the experiment lasted four years.
  • Adequate vitamin D3 dose: While the dosage did not quite meet the recommendations of the Vitamin D Council of 5000 IU per day, it provided enough vitamin D to cause a significant increase in vitamin D levels at 2,000 IU per day.
  • Use of a control group: Researchers compared the difference in cancer incidence between the vitamin D group and a control group. The control group received placebo.

After four years of supplementing with 2000 IU of vitamin D3 daily, the average vitamin D levels of the vitamin D group increased from 32.8 ng/ml to 43.9 ng/ml. The control group’s average levels decreased slightly from an average of 32.8 ng/ml to 31.6 ng/ml.

Throughout the four years, 106 of the 2,300 women developed at least one type of non-skin cancer. The researchers discovered that cancer incidence (43 treatment and 63 controls) was significantly lower in the treatment group (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the analyses revealed that both vitamin D supplementation and vitamin D status were significant predictors of cancer risk after one year of intervention.

The researchers stated,

“Supplementing with 2000 IU/day of vitamin D3 and 1500 mg/day of calcium substantially reduced risk of all cancers combined. This finding provides great impetus for improving vitamin D status through advances in vitamin D nutritional policy.”

This study presented a groundbreaking discovery for public health. Cancer is the number two cause of death in the United States with approximately 40% of men and women developing cancer in their lifetime. This upsetting percentage could decrease through the identification of modifiable risk factors, such as vitamin D and calcium supplementation.

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/vitamin-d-and-calcium-supplementation-reduces-cancer-risk-according-to-rct/

DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

Back to Top
123Donna View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: Aug 24 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 12994
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 07 2017 at 10:53pm
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123 45>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.01
Copyright ©2001-2018 Web Wiz Ltd.