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cwaltjen View Drop Down
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    Posted: Jan 06 2016 at 2:26pm
Hi!  I'm 41 years old and BRCA 1+. On 11/25/15 I went for what I thought was a prophylactic mastectomy.  The pathology came back to with a 1 cm, grade 3 triple negative tumor.  I met with the oncologist shortly after, however he wanted me to have to lymph nodes checked before deciding which chemo path to take.  If they were positive he said definitely ACT.  If they were negative he said he might leave of the A and just do CT or he may still decide to do the ACT still. 

So, I was just wondering if anyone else is/was in a similar situation and which chemo path was taken.

Thanks in advance!


Edited by cwaltjen - Jan 06 2016 at 2:43pm
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Tamara View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tamara Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 06 2016 at 3:33pm
Cwaltjen,
My tumor size & grade same as yours - I had no nodes involved and BRCA negative. After discussion with my Oncologist - he strongly suggested that I have 4 A/C and 12 weekly Taxol treatments as my chemo option.
I had a lumpectomy, followed by partial radiation at the tumor site, then chemo treatments. I chose to have the A/C & Taxol.
Best wishes to you,
Tamara
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KristyLee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 06 2016 at 11:38pm
Welcome! Sorry things worked out this way for you. I have no medical background other than being a patient, but I would encourage you to be aggressive, because triple negative is aggressive. If your doctor recommends less than ACT, I would seek a second opinion. Since you have the BRCA1 mutation, I would also ask about Carboplatin. 

Good luck with your treatment plan, whatever it may be. Hugs!
Dx 09/14 Stage 2 TNBC, Grade 3, 3cm, no nodes. BRCA1+ Neoadjuvant treatment: 4 AC/T, 12 Taxol, 4 Carboplatin. BMX Diep Flap Hyster 3/5/15. Path report PCR, no radiation advised.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Katdoll Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 07 2016 at 12:35am
My profile was similar to yours.  BRCA1+ with a 1cm IDC.  They did not find any lymph node involvement.  My oncologist gave me a choice: either AC/Taxol, or Taxotere/cytoxan.  I chose the AC/Taxol because survival statistics were a bit better based on my age, stage, etc.  Your oncologist should be able to show you survival statistics for different chemo regimens - if s/he hasn't, ask for them.  Wishing you the best as you move forward.  Post again, or feel free to send me a private message, if you have any more questions!
Tested positive for BRCA1 mutation (187delAG) in 4/09 @ age 44; BSO 9/09; diagnosed w/TNBC in 10/09; 1 cm Stage 1 TNBC IDC, grade 3 + 1.5 cm DCIS; BMX 11/09, nodes clear; chemo (AC/T).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 07 2016 at 8:33am
Hi cwaltjen!  Is this a new cancer?  The only reason I'm asking is it looks like you joined in 2013 so I'm wondering if this is a new cancer diagnosis.  If so, what was your previous chemo?  Either way, it's good that they found it early.  Have you considered getting a second opinion from an NCCN institution or a teaching hospital?  I think second opinions will help make better treatment decisions and give you peace of mind.  Wishing you the best.

Donna
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cwaltjen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 07 2016 at 9:16am
Thanks for the responses!
Yes this is a new cancer.  I joined in earlier because I was doing research for my sister. I'm no stranger to this disease.  My sister was first diagnosed in 2010, then with mets in 2013.  Unfortunately she passed from this nasty disease in 2 years ago tomorrow.Cry

I have thought about getting a second opinion, but haven't done so yet.  I wanted to get started as soon as possible to get this over with.  

My current oncologist did say that he wants to treat this aggressively.  I will ask for the statistics based on the different chemo regimens. Thanks for the suggestions 

The oncologist did also suggest a clinical trail after chemo.  The trial is for a PARP inhibitor.  I'm not sure of the details for the trial though, that is something I wanted to ask at the next visit.  My sister was in a clinical trial for Valiparib, however, it didn't help her at all.

I will see how my appointment goes next Wednesday and schedule a second opinion if I'm not satisfied.  

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 07 2016 at 7:12pm
cwaltjen,

Thanks for the explanation, now it makes sense.  I'm so sorry you are dealing with this new cancer and also the lost of your sister.  It must be very difficult for you.

I only suggest a second opinion as looking back it's the one recommendation I'd tell anyone who is newly diagnosed.  I got second and third opinions when I had my recurrence and it helped me make and feel comfortable with my treatment decisions.  There is an NCCN facility in Cleveland.  Perhaps you are already going there.  Please let us know what you decide.  

DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kellyless Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 08 2016 at 12:30am
Cwaltjen,
So sorry you've another reason to be here, but so glad you found us then and now. 
A second opinion saved my life, no doubt about it!  I suggest you contact Steve here on the boards - he's Sage Patient Advocate - and has tremendous experience with the BRCA + , he and his daughter are, and he is a patient advocate.  He would probably know the best place/Dr to get a second opinion with your stats. 
I was BRCA - , 45 yrs old and had just a smidge of spread to one lymph node.  I did the AC/T route, and obviously glad I did since I've gotten this far without recurrence :)
Find the best facility and Dr that specializes in Hereditary BRCA cancers and get that 2nd opinion!  One thing I've never heard someone say here in all these years is that they regretted getting the 2nd opinion.  Let us know what you decide! 
IDC, 2.2 cm, Stage IIb,lumpectomy 1/30/09 ACx4,Tx4 36 rads
6/1/17 Local recurrence same breast, same spot 1.8cm Carb.4x every 3 wks, Taxol 12x once wk. Dbl Mast. PCR!! Reconstruction fail, NED!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cwaltjen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 18 2016 at 9:11am
I met with the oncologist again last week.  We had a lengthy discussion.  At the end he left it up to me to decide if I would have ACT or TC.  He said he was comfortable with me having either.  We also discussed a clinical trial for a parp inhibitor.  The inclusion criteria of that trial included having the ACT therapy first.  He was checking the other criteria to determine if I quality for the trial or not.  

I have decided to go with the ACT.  I decided I don't want to take any chances.  I would like to know that I treated this as aggressively as possible.  Plus, if I decide to do the trial, this is what is required anyway.

So, I start Chemo on Tuesday.  I'm so nervous, but I will get through this! 


Edited by cwaltjen - Jan 18 2016 at 9:23am
BRCA1+(187delAG)9/10; BSO & Hysterectomy 4/14;PMB 11/2015(age 41)pathology revealed 1cm Stage1 TNBC, grade 3 IDC; 12/15 Auxiliary lymph node dissection, nodes negative; starting chemo (AC/T) 1/19/16.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kellyless Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 18 2016 at 1:30pm
Being 41, are you pre-menopausal?  If you are I suggest you call your Dr. and ask about ovary preserving medication like Zoladex.  If there's one thing I could change about my treatment that would be it.  The chemo induced menopause has been - and continues to be- Very Unpleasant.  It would've been great to NOT have to deal with that, whilst getting over all of the other treatment I had.  You may think, like I did, "I'm DONE having kids, it'd be great to never have periods again!"  Well - Not So Much.  I'd Love to have my functioning ovaries back for Many Reasons!  So - just a thought, since you haven't started yet.

Have you had a port put in yet?  My port was a Rock Star, I was so grateful for it.

Has anyone spoken to you about the chemo induced nausea?  With todays amazing anti-nausea medications you should _Never_ be so sick that you vomit.  Usually a cocktail of several medications will be prescribed to take immediately following chemo.  Take them on a rigid time schedule.  Write it down, set timers and take those medications exactly as prescribed and you should not suffer to the point of vomiting.  If you take the medications as prescribed and you DO vomit, call and page your Dr. immediately - day or night - and immediately change to another medication.  Know where your nearest 24 pharmacy is just in case this happens.  Most likely it will not happen, the meds are strong and they work!  Mine did, I never threw up not even once.  I do know a couple of women that had to change to a 2nd drug, but then that worked 100%.  Do Not Suffer in silence.  Take whatever medications you need to get thru these treatments.  At various times I added pain medication for bone pain, and eventually Anti-depressants to control that - all used briefly but effectively to keep my quality of life in an acceptible place.  I also pre-bought a wig and some hats and scarves, since I knew I'd want to cover my head, having a school age child. 
For entertainment, I bought my first Kindle and yarn for a New Large blanket I knitted during my treatment.  Reading and knitting was my Jam during chemo and the immediate days following each one.   It helped. 
My cancer center has a Nutritionist that works with the cancer patients.  She came by and saw me during each of my chemo treatments to talk about food.  Helping with ideas for things that would be easy on my stomach, that would taste good with the weird chemo-taste buds and most importantly foods full of Iron to battle the anemia.  Ask your Dr. if they offer that. 
I highly suggest attending a "Look Good, Feel Better" seminar!  Google that, on their website go to "programs" then "programs for Women" then "Group Programs" to Find a Local Group Program Now - search by zip code.  Free 2 hour classes for women In Chemo.  Not only do they give you tips and tricks for feeling better about your appearance, they give you a bag of free high end makeup geared toward patients, and they have Wigs, Hats and Scarves to play with and then KEEP whatever you like.  It's a really awesome thing, I cannot say enough good things about it! It's also great to be in a room full of mostly breast cancer patients right at the same stage you are in chemo.  The first time I sat around with a bunch of strangers with my bald head out - very liberating :) They were helpful in talking about skin care in radiation as well. 
You'll be fine, and we'll be here for you!  You've made the right choice to take the Big Guns chemo and looking into Clinical Trials.  Know that we'll all be here anytime, so bring us your fears and questions.  {{{Big Hug}}}  Kelly
IDC, 2.2 cm, Stage IIb,lumpectomy 1/30/09 ACx4,Tx4 36 rads
6/1/17 Local recurrence same breast, same spot 1.8cm Carb.4x every 3 wks, Taxol 12x once wk. Dbl Mast. PCR!! Reconstruction fail, NED!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cwaltjen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 21 2016 at 8:59am
Thanks for all the info Kelly!  Yes my nurse did talk to me about these issues.  She made me promise to call if the nausea meds don't work, or if I vomiting at all.  

Since I'm BRCA 1+, I had a complete hysterectomy, including ovary removal almost 2 years ago.  I've already gone through all the menopause symptoms, so at least that's one thing I don't have to worry about. 

I went for my first infusion on Wednesday.  After being there all day, I wasn't able to get the actual chemo.  I got the premeds when the nurse checked my IV she said she wasn't getting a good return.  She stuck me again with the same results.  Another nurse came in and wasn't able to find any veins to use.  She said my veins were too small.  They were trying to get a PICC line team to come put a PICC line in, but by that time it was already 4:30 so I'm sure they were ready to go home for the day.  

I'm getting my port placed tomorrow, then will have chemo right after that.  Should be a fun day! 
BRCA1+(187delAG)9/10; BSO & Hysterectomy 4/14;PMB 11/2015(age 41)pathology revealed 1cm Stage1 TNBC, grade 3 IDC; 12/15 Auxiliary lymph node dissection, nodes negative; starting chemo (AC/T) 1/19/16.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kellyless Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 21 2016 at 10:57am
Oh no, that's a terrible "first chemo" story! I cannot for the life of me understand why a Dr would even consider doing this chemo regimen without a port! And a PICC is a huge pain in the butt comparatively - I'm glad they didn't do it! Getting the port put in is truly NBD.  They put you into "Twilight sleep", which to you will mean Knock you OUT, and not for very long.  Your chest where the port is will ache a bit, but compared to your other surgeries?  It's like a finger prick for getting a drop of blood.  Once it's in, if it works perfectly (odds are it will), they will not need to access a vein for ANYTHING as long as you have it! They draw blood from it as well as put all meds in it - piece of cake! Now, the only nurses that should use your port need to be the specially trained ones, and I'd go one step further and ask every medical person that approaches you to access it - "How long have you been using this kind of port?  When did you learn - lately or years ago?"  With all we are going thru we deserve THE BEST - No In Training Personal  do our Procedures.  I was at a teaching hospital and I feel it is the absolute best place for us to be for treatment!  They can bring in crowds of interns to observe, ask me questions, palpate me from top to bottom - but NOPE on cutting me or stabbing me.  I would make that clear each time - starting with the Port Placement.  I'd introduce myself to the interns with my fabulous Dr. in the pre-surgery talk, then say "Glad to have you guys!  But you do not have permission to put in my port.  Only Dr. Huhus can cut me open, place my port or sew me up.  No offense!  I'm fighting for my life here, once I"m cured y'all can learn on my body again :)"   And the same thing with my Port access - introduce myself, shake their hand then ask How Long, How many, How Much Experience?  Just learned last month?  NOPE.  I politely decline, if you could go get your supervisor I'd be most grateful THANK YOU.  Just a lil FYI - The port is Easy Smeezy, but only but an experienced person should access it.

Our infusions are short compared to a lot of chemo infusions.  The chemo infusion itself was never more than about 2 - 3 hours.  I've heard all these stories about the Long Days getting this chemo - I'm here to tell you it should not be.  My fab cancer facility had it DOWN.  I'd arrive at 8:00am on chemo day and sign in.  Within 10 minutes I'd be called back to the lab for weighing, Blood pressure and  the blood draw from my port.  They'd also leave the line in the port to be accessed for chemo.   By 8:30 I'd be in a room waiting for my Dr. to come in for my appointment with her (You see your Dr. before every chemo).  She'd come in and check me out physically, by then they'd have my lab results in the computer and she'd read those to me - we'd talk about my ever worsening anemia, my other concerns, etc.  She might write me a prescription or tweak the instructions.  Then I was off down the hall to the chemo area.  They'd put me straight into my room (they have Private chemo rooms for all).  It was usually a little after 9:00am at this point.  My designated chemo nurse of the day would settle me in and hook up the IV to the line already in my port and start the saline solution.  75% of the time the pharmacy had already delivered my drugs and she'd start the pre-meds at this point.  Twice my meds weren't there yet and they'd fall all over themselves apologizing!  I never waited more than 20 more minutes tho for my drugs to show up.  The first infusion of each new drug your nurse will hang around and watch you for reactions.  So little bags of Steroids, Benadryl, anti-nausea all take around 30-45 minutes to infuse.  Then they hook up the chemo du jour, that drips for 2-3 hours.  If Benedryl was in your pre-meds, you will be dozing at this point most likely.  If I was doing Taxol, this is when I'd start the Ice Bath on my hands - and that would continue the Whole Time I was receiving the Taxol (prevents neuropathy like a CHAMP!) My husband would head the cafeteria and get us lunch about 11:00am and bring it back and we'd eat together.  I had my treatments on Fridays, and they always had a really good fish dish - so I ate a fish dinner for lunch every chemo day :) All 8 times I was outta there between 12:noon - 1pm.  EVERY. TIME. 
My point of that LONG story is - if your chemo treatments (if there are no complications) are taking longer than 6 hours from beginning to end your facility is doing it wrong.  Compare my steps, time your steps and find where they're wasting your time.  Then politely have a conversation with your Dr. and his nurse about Cutting out the wait and nonsense and making your NEXT chemo a swift one.  "Do I need to call a couple of hours before I arrive to remind you guys to get my meds ordered and delivered from the hospital pharmacy?  Is there a day of the week I can change my treatments to when you you are NOT seeing so many patients that I have to wait 2 hours to see you?  Is there a different lab in this facility that can get my bloodwork results Faster, since I know the actual test on my blood once you have it takes less than 5 minutes? I'm doing this 8 times and quite frankly being here makes me feel ILL and ANXIETY ridden, so how can we get this process down to a reasonable time?"
Be your own best advocate! 

Last thing - when you are receiving the AC - the A is bright red, and so you will pee bright red for a few times that day.  Don't be alarmed, it's normal to pee out the bright red Adriamycin!

Best of luck today!  Let us know how you are when you can.   Kelly
IDC, 2.2 cm, Stage IIb,lumpectomy 1/30/09 ACx4,Tx4 36 rads
6/1/17 Local recurrence same breast, same spot 1.8cm Carb.4x every 3 wks, Taxol 12x once wk. Dbl Mast. PCR!! Reconstruction fail, NED!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KatieM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 30 2016 at 10:03pm
Kelly this is priceless info.
I'm doing Taxol for my last 3 chemo sessions so Id love to know what is a hand ice bath and how do you do it ?
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Hi does anyone have information on ixempra treatment
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote trisheey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 11 2016 at 11:52pm
I am finishing up my last cycle of carbo/abraxane and will be starting Adria/Cytoxan Dose dense for 4 cycles.  Then I will have a double mastectomy.  Any recommendations for being comfortable during the adria/cytoxan?  The carbo/abraxane wasn't exactly comfortable, and my counts were often in the toilet.  I needed a transfusion of packed red cells last week.  I am hoping that my counts stay good enough to treat!  I feel so guilty because I asked my doctor for a temporary disabled parking permit today.  On top of receiving chemotherapy, I also had a pulmonary embolism a few months back.  So, I can't breathe because my hemoglobin is always below 9 plus I have some damage to my lung due to the clot.  I guess I feel guilty because I always feel like there is someone who is more sick than I am, who could use it more.  I felt this way about receiving the blood transfusion also.  Turns out my husband, his sister and my 2 sisters are all the same blood type as me: A+.. as long as they keep donating, I will agree to a transfusion :)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dawnhashope2 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 22 2016 at 12:17am
I am so sorry to hear about your diagnosis. Tripple negative breast cancer,as my surgeon said. 'IT'S THE WORST DIAGNOSIS YOU COLD HAVE". I was diagnosed in 2014 with sTage 2 triple negative breast cancer. The tumor was 5cm. It spread to 2 limph nodes under my right arm each were larger than 2 cm. The Doctors worked very quickly. 1st was 18 chemo's then a bilateral mastectomy. I chose to do both sides because I wanted them to match. Good thing because through pathology they found it in the left breast also. Then I started radiation therapy, 26 of them. Radiation therapy is done daily 5 or 6 days per week. Iwas blessed with 5. I myself am 54.I would tell anyone with a triple negative diagnoses to get a mastectomy. Do chemo and radiation. This Cancer is the worst diagnosis that you can get. Good luck to you young lady and God Bless you
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gordon15 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 23 2016 at 3:32pm
Dawn- I must say it's refreshing to read a straight-forward post like yours. If my wife had a dbl masectomy in 2008 with Stage2B IDC/Lobular, she wouldn't have gotten TNBC most likely in her other breast. I'm sure there are exceptions, but probabilities with TNBC are well-known.
wife: IDC/Lobular Stage2B 2008 lumpectomy/TAC+rads
TNBC Stage 3A/w/metaplastic/squamous Nov2015 Carboplatin-Gemzar chemo/masectomy Taxolchemo+rads 4-16
PET scan stable 9-2016/ 1-2017
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tulips Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 23 2016 at 4:46pm
Hmmmmm…..I have mixed feelings about this!  I think it's awesome for us to all be candid and share our experiences--good & bad.  We learn so much from hearing all the points of view.  And so I'm grateful, Dawn, for your strong comments.  At the same time, it sounds a little alarmist to me (not just your comments, but your surgeon's!!!).  First of all, TNBC is NOT the worst diagnosis you can have.  I'm sure people with Stage 4 pancreatic cancer would have a varying point of view.  Especially for the ladies who catch their TNBC early, or who have a great response to chemo, the prognosis is quite positive, and I hate the idea of newly diagnosed women reading this and being unnecessarily terrified.  And even for me, with a decent-sized 2.2 cm tumor and not a complete response to chemo, I do not feel doomed.  I fully understand my risks (and I believe they are worse than my MO made them out to be, so I'm not a pollyanna), but I do not think it is the worst situation.  I believe there is a very rational case for me to be hopeful, and not dwell on thinking this is the WORST DIAGNOSIS I COULD HAVE.

Additionally, I think most of us know that there are some positives that come with TNBC vs. hormone positive BC.  In particular, due to its aggressive nature, while unfortunately it can have a tendency to recur quickly (a negative), after several years pass without recurrence, women can feel pretty comfortable that they are cured, which is less true for hormone positive (a positive).  I consider this a HUGE mental plus.  Lucky for Dawn that she is over 2 years since diagnosis, she's getting close to a point where she can breathe easier, which is awesome.

On the mastectomy question, it is completely rational for people in both Dawn's and Gordon's wife's situations to feel that mastectomy is a no-brainer.  In Dawn's case, the mastectomy removed extra cancer, and in G's w's case, she ultimately recurred in the remaining breast tissue, which is heart-breaking and very hard to not regret not have a BMx.  Yet I hope people keep in mind that there are all sorts of anecdotal stories.  People can die in major surgery.  Complications abound in more major surgeries.  There are lots of issues (medical, emotional/body image, etc) that people suffer with mastectomies.  I have seen so many women write about having 12-20 surgeries after Mx, including planned reconstruction but obviously to get to those numbers that must include many complications and revisions and issues to get to that number of surgeries.  So if a mastectomy makes sense in a situation (BRCA+, large tumor relative to breast size, multi-focal tumors, recurrence and not allowed to repeat radiation, etc etc), by all means people should embrace the modern successful mastectomy surgeries that are available and be grateful for them.  They can be life-saving!  But there are loads of cases where lumpectomy can be the superior choice.  And study after study shows that lumpectomy plus radiation has same survival as mastectomy.  Within those large populations there will be individual anecdotal cases that would convince us to go for one or the other, but the big picture show equivalency.  Additionally, there was a major study that came out this year that showed that Lx plus rads was BETTER than MX for survival.  Now there could be several explanations for this.  It could be that the ladies who chose Mx had more advanced/serious cases of TNBC, so that skewed the data so they'd have worse survival.  Or it could be that the radiation is the critical element (and some Mx patients get rads but many don't, while all Lx patients tend to get rads).  I guess it could also be that more of the Mx patients had very serious/fatal complications related to their major surgery.  My guess is that radiation is probably a key element in survival.  We all know of people who had mastectomies and STILL had recurrences.  Mastectomy greatly reduces the risk of recurrence, but does not eliminate it.  I do not mean to bash mastectomy--I fully believe that it is the right choice for many women.  But I do not think it is the right choice for all TNBC women.  So my two cents of advice would be to hear all of these stories from each of us, then consider the characteristics of your individual cancer situation, and talk it all over with multiple great doctors.  Don't listen too much to me cheerlead for lumpectomy or another person cheerlead for Mx.

Trisheey, I hope you are doing well!  And I send positive wishes to all.  Gordon, you are such an awesome contributor on this forum; I'm always grateful for your comments.  I love seeing the "NED 9-2016" in your signature!!!!  Fabulous news.  And Dawn, I'm so glad you have moved on and are happy with your treatment choices.  Thanks to you, too, for sharing your story.

Tulips


Edited by Tulips - Sep 23 2016 at 7:34pm
Dx April 2015 IDC TN 2.2 cm, Grade 3, Chemo started May 2015: Taxol/Carbo then AC, Lx with SNB Nov 2015, 33 Rad Dec 2015-Feb 2016. 6 months Capecitabine starting March 2016
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Dawnhashope2 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dawnhashope2 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 24 2016 at 10:44am
I would like to apologize to anyone I scared or upset for the compliments I made,about TNBC. My Dr told me that it was the worst diagnosis that I could have when it comes to breast cancer.
Sincerely
Dawn
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Hi Dawn,

Welcome to this group.  I understand you were just sharing your story.  Most going through the diagnosis and treatment are very scared.  I remember when I was dx 7 years ago everything I googled and read all started out with the same story line:  a rare and aggressive bc with a poor prognosis.  Geez, did they have to start every article with the same language?  TNBC is aggressive, but oftentimes responds very well to chemo.  Our stats can actually be better than other types of bc after 5 years as the chance of recurrence goes way down.  Wishing you the best.

Donna

 
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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