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new nanoparticle design for cancer therapy

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    Posted: Sep 20 2011 at 9:43pm

UNC scientist proves potential of new nanoparticle design for cancer therapy

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. - A new type of nanoparticle developed in the laboratories at the University of North Carolina has shown potential for more effective delivery of chemotherapy to treat cancer. Wenbin Lin, PhD, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy, and colleagues report their finding in the Sept. 14, 2011 issue of Angewandte Chemie, the German-based flagship chemistry journal.

In laboratory studies, Lin and colleagues developed and tested a new type of nanoparticle that can deliver larger amounts of a drug and will not leak the drug as the particle circulates through the blood stream on its way to the target.

In the proof-of-concept experiments, they tested the nanoparticle’s ability to deliver therapeutic doses of the chemotherapy drug oxaliplatin to colon and pancreatic tumors. The oxaliplatin-based particles showed significant growth inhibition of pancreatic tumors that are extremely difficult to treat. The nanoparticle has two to three times therapeutic efficacy over oxaliplatin.

The nanoparticle is different from other nanoparticles in its very high drug loading and in the ability to release in the chemotherapeutics in a controlled fashion. The release of therapeutic cargoes depends on the naturally occurring molecules that are more abundant in many tumors.

To read the entire article:

http://www.breakthroughdigest.com/medical-news/unc-scientist-proves-potential-of-new-nanoparticle-design-for-cancer-therapy/

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 29 2012 at 8:46pm
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UT researchers’ innovation addresses major challenge of drug delivery

A new physical form of proteins developed by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin could drastically improve treatments for cancer and other diseases, as well as overcome some of the largest challenges in therapeutics: delivering drugs to patients safely, easily and more effectively.

The protein formulation strategy, developed by faculty and students in the Cockrell School of Engineering’s Department of Chemical Engineering, is unprecedented and offers a new and universal approach to drug delivery A– one that could revolutionize treatment of cancer, arthritis and infectious disease.

http://www.breakthroughdigest.com/medical-news/ut-researchers-innovation-addresses-major-challenge-of-drug-delivery/

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 17 2012 at 8:37pm
Targeted Nanoparticle Tested in Patients with Cancer
Artists rendering of BIND-014. (Illustration by Gaël McGill, Digizyme, Inc.) Artist's rendering of BIND-014. (Illustration by Gaël McGill, Digizyme, Inc.)

The first trial to test a targeted nanoparticle capable of controlling a drug's release is now under way in humans. By packaging molecules of thechemotherapy drug docetaxel in nanoparticles, researchers aim to deliver a higher dose of the drug directly to tumors and to reduce the toxicity to patients. In animal studies performed before the trial, the nanoparticle delivered a greater amount of the drug to tumor cells than could be achieved with the unpackaged (or free) drug. In addition, the nanoparticle did not show any more toxicity than docetaxel on its own.

Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, BIND Biosciences, Inc., and their colleagues reported the development of the nanoparticle, called BIND-014, in the April 4 Science Translational Medicine.

"Normally, when you give cancer drugs they go through the whole body, and they cause really bad side effects. And only a certain amount goes to the tumor," said Dr. Robert Langer of MIT, one of the senior authors of the study. "This trial has given us an initial indication that this nanoparticle approach is safer and much more efficacious."

To read the entire article:

http://www.cancer.gov/ncicancerbulletin/041712/page2

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 13 2015 at 8:46pm
Researchers look at area around tumors to help personalize treatment for triple-negative breast cancer

Nanoparticle drugs--tiny containers packed with medicine and with the potential to be shipped straight to tumors--were thought to be a possible silver bullet against cancer. However new cancer drugs based on nanoparticles have not improved overall survival rates for cancer patients very much. Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill now think that failure may have less to do with the drugs and tumors than it does the tumor's immediate surroundings.

The work, published in Clinical Cancer Research, merges relatively old and new ideas in cancer treatment, on one hand underscoring the importance of personalized medicine and on the other, reinforcing a relatively new idea that the tumor microenvironment might affect the delivery of drugs to tumors - a factor that may alter drug delivery from person to person, from cancer to cancer and even from tumor to tumor.

"Tumors create bad neighborhoods," said William Zamboni, the study's senior author and an associate professor at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. "They spawn leaky, jumbled blood vessels that are like broken streets, blind alleys and busted sewers. There are vacant lots densely overgrown with collagen fibers. Immune-system cells patrolling the streets might be good guys turned bad, actually working for the tumor. And we're trying to get a large truckload of medicine through all of that."

In their work, Zamboni and colleagues from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and the UNC School of Medicine joined forces to see how much of the standard small-molecule cancer drug doxorubicin and its nanoparticle version, Doxil, actually made it into two varieties of triple-negative breast-cancer tumor models created by UNC's Chuck Perou, the May Goldman Shaw Distinguished Professor of Molecular Oncology at the UNC School of Medicine and a professor at UNC Lineberger. Triple-negative breast cancer accounts for 10 to 17 percent of cases and has a poorer prognosis than other types of breast cancer.

At first, what they saw was no surprise: significantly more of the nanodrug Doxil made it into both triple-negative breast-cancer tumors compared with the standard small-molecule doxorubicin. "That's nothing new," Zamboni said. "We've seen that for twenty years." They also saw the same amount of doxorubin in both tumors.

What did surprise them was that significantly more of the nanodrug Doxil - twice as much - was delivered to the C3-TAg triple-negative breast cancer tumor than to the T11 triple-negative breast cancer tumor.

"These tumors are subtypes of a subtype of one kind of cancer and are relatively closely related," said Zamboni. "If the differences in delivering nanoagents to these two tumors are so significant, we can only imagine what the differences might be between breast cancer and lung cancer."

Zamboni and his team suggest that better profiling of tumors and their microenvironments would allow doctors not only to better identify patients who would most benefit from nanoparticle-based cancer therapy, but also that clinicians may need to learn more about a patient's tumor before prescribing treatment with one of the newer nanoparticle drugs.

"It looks like the tumor microenvironment could play a big role in cancer treatment," said Zamboni. "It may be the factor that could point us in the right direction for personalized care not only for triple-negative breast cancer but for any type."

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-01/uonc-tmi011315.php

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