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Lee21 View Drop Down
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    Posted: Jan 14 2012 at 10:17pm
Hi,
I am wondering how many of us diagnosed with TNBC made lifestyle changes: diet, exercise, relaxation.  There does seem to be some indication that such changes may be associated with better survival but I'm not sure if necessarily through lowering the risk for breast cancer recurrence. 

If you will, please indicate if you made changes in
a) diet (I'm particularly interested in soy consumption since there seems to be some concern about soy's estrogenic effects)
b) alcohol consumption
c) exercise level
d) added relaxation techniques

And, if you have, what do you think helped you at least your sense of well being?

Were you able to keep up the changes during chemo?

For myself, upon being diagnosed I changed to eating fish and vegetables/fruits only, omitting meat, animal (except for fish) and diary products.  I haven't touched alcohol since (I used to have a glass of wine each day).  I have been taking brisk walks for 30 minutes each day and am contemplating adding yoga.  I am concerned about my ability to keep up with these changes during treatment.

Lee
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cheeks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 15 2012 at 2:09am
Originally posted by Lee21 Lee21 wrote:

Hi,
I am wondering how many of us diagnosed with TNBC made lifestyle changes: diet, exercise, relaxation.  There does seem to be some indication that such changes may be associated with better survival but I'm not sure if necessarily through lowering the risk for breast cancer recurrence. 

If you will, please indicate if you made changes in
a) diet (I'm particularly interested in soy consumption since there seems to be some concern about soy's estrogenic effects)
b) alcohol consumption
c) exercise level
d) added relaxation techniques

And, if you have, what do you think helped you at least your sense of well being?

Were you able to keep up the changes during chemo?

For myself, upon being diagnosed I changed to eating fish and vegetables/fruits only, omitting meat, animal (except for fish) and diary products.  I haven't touched alcohol since (I used to have a glass of wine each day).  I have been taking brisk walks for 30 minutes each day and am contemplating adding yoga.  I am concerned about my ability to keep up with these changes during treatment.

Lee

Lee, 

It's nice to meet you and I am sure you will receive quite a few responses to your questions. They are good questions to ask. I can only speak for myself and that I am still working on making changes. 

 My oncologist gave me some guidelines for diet which i tried my best to follow: (i also have type 2 diabetes, cholesterol and triglyceride problems and have been overweight for quite a few years - plus just post-menopausal at the time)

1) No soy products
2) Only cooked fruits and vegetables (not raw) reasoning was to be cautious of things that might cause stomach upset etc.
3) She added Vitamin D3 to my daily meds as my level was low which i know is fairly common with TN

I am sure there were other things suggested that i don't even remember now. 

I have never been much of a drinker but to tell you the truth after each chemo my husband and I would go out to eat and i would usually have a small drink as long as i was feeling okay. (I don't remember if she addressed alcohol consumption but after being there for 5-6 hours i wanted to have one) 

I walked more than usual and a lot of it was out of "nervous energy" - following my mastectomy and through most of chemo I did circles around the neighborhood and probably walked about 5 miles each day according to my husband - think i wore him and one of my sisters out LOL 

There were many nights i only slept a few hours and then might take a nap during the day. I did have and do have some relaxation CD's i listen to - i think whatever you can find for relaxation - stress relief is a good thing. 

This site is a wonderful, warm, caring and informative place to come. The people here are more than willing to listen, answer and assist you and each other through this journey - they certainly have been so with me...Wacko

I am still a "work in progress" and more than one person has reminded me to be kind and gentle with myself. 

Blair






Edited by cheeks - Jan 15 2012 at 2:14am
Lump found 11/08
DX: 2/09 @52 TNBC
L. Mast. 3/26/09, SN-, BRCA-,
4.5 cm (post surgical)T2NOMO
Chemo: 4/09-10/09 Taxol x 12,
A/C x 4, No rad.No recon. NED 1/17. New Primary right breast TN, 2/2018.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Charlene Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 15 2012 at 7:58am
Hi, Lee,
 
I get more exercise--treadmill and walking the dog minimum of 4 hours per week
Less alcohol, although I still enjoy a beer and/or glass of wine on weekends.  (My oncologist says all things in moderation.)
I take Vitamin D3.
More fruits and vegetables, less fat, but I am not a vegetarian by any stretch.
Mentally--I remind myself to enjoy every day, to give thanks for every day.  I don't take the little things for granted any more--I appreciate them.
Wishing you the best,
Charlene
DX 3/10 @59 ILC/TNBC
Stage 1, Grade 2, Multifocal; Lumpectomy/re-excision
SNB 0/4 nodes, BRCA-; Taxotere/Cytoxan X4, 30 rads
3/14:NED
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 15 2012 at 11:32am
Lee,

If you can, I think it is very helpful if you can get some exercise in during chemo, especially walking.  For me going through mastectomy then chemo the first time, I didn't have much energy and didn't exercise much at all.  Just walking up the stairs or to the mailbox was about all I could handle some days.  That's OK, just do whatever your body can handle.  After chemo, I started exercising and working out with weight machines to get my strength back.  Then I had a recurrence and had to go through chemo again and then radiation.  Both zapped my strength terribly while trying to work during treatment.  I allowed myself to only concentrate on what I could actively handle and not worry about what I couldn't do.  Since finishing treatment I haven't exercised like I would like to.  The fatigue is still there.  When the weather is nice, I take long walks with my dog on the weekends.  I've signed up for a Yoga class that I hope to start soon.

As far as diet goes, I ate pretty healthy before breast cancer.  I used to drink wine more often, but now just have an occasional glass or two.  I didn't drink during chemo, just never felt like it.  We switched to only organic dairy products like milk and yogurt.  I added more Omega 3's to my diet and Vitamin D3 (please see the thread on Vitamin D3 as most of us with TNBC are deficient in Vitamin D).

I'm going to a mediation technique class at our Cancer Support Community to learn more about mediation.  I bought audiotape by Pema Chodron's.  Basically I've changed my philosophy from trying to get everything done on my list each day and feeling like I have to be in control of all aspects of my life, to I do what I can and not worry about the rest.  My motto is "baby steps".  I don't sweat the stuff that I can't do or don't achieve.  I pat myself on the back on what I can.  I realize I no longer have control in my life and that's OK, I'll work with what I can control.  Cancer has given me the ability to see that my life won't be about my plans, but about what happens.  I have to adjust the new me to best handle the life I now have.  I try to appreciate each day and not to expect anymore than what I have now.

Donna
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote susanb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 15 2012 at 11:44am
My oncologist says that us 3N gals don't have to worry about soy. Also BC rates for Japanese women (who eat a lot of soy) are almost non existent.

A low fat (30 grams a day or less) has been proven to be effective in lowering recurrence rates for 3N BC, so I try very hard to stick to it. I am mostly vegetarian, with some of the "good fat" fish occasionally. I exercise regularly. I used to practice yoga and mean to get back to it.

I try to eat as clean as I can. I grow a lot of my own vegetables organically in my front yard. I rarely drink wine or beer and no hard booze at all. I am in the process of giving up milk products. I am trying to eat more raw and only lightly cooked veggies. I don't fry anything.

I try to avoid all chemical exposure and use only non metallic deodorant and non chemical toothpaste. I have been NED for over 5 years.
Dx June 06 stage 1 at age 46, no nodes, clean margins, Ki-67 at 54, Bilateral Mastectomy, 4 rounds AC, complete hysterectomy Aug O7. Mother and Grandmother both died of breast cancer dx in their 30's.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote christina1961 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 15 2012 at 3:03pm
I haven't eaten any meats except fish and shellfish for the past several years.  I eat quite a bit of vegetables and fruit. I walked quite a bit during my first chemo, but as all of this has dragged on I have exercised less and less.  I plan to change that in a few weeks when I get finished with this chemo.  I used to exercise vigorously 4-5 days a week for many, many years but started slacking off five years ago. I have cut back on sugar but haven't cut it out yet.  I don't drink or smoke and haven't for over 25 years.
2.5 cm TNBC, BRCA-, diag. 2/11, neoadj chemotherapy, uni MX, y2cm,2/16 nodes, RCBII, tumor retested 5-10%ER+,PR-,Her2-, rads, clin trial eribulin 10/11-2/12, tamox.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lee21 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 15 2012 at 3:45pm
For those of you who have responded, thank you.  Hope we hear from more of the others. 

I think lifestyle changes give us back some of the control that has been yanked from us overnight. One can abuse one's body for years and never get cancer, others who do everything right, nevertheless get cancer and it's never clear why. With a statistic such as 1 in 8 women getting breast cancer sometime during her lifetime, it would seem that there has to be environmental contributions.
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ds21 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 16 2012 at 12:01am
The University of Connecticut recently disciplined a prominent scientist studying the health effects of red wine for faking data http://the-scientist.com/2012/01/13/wine-researcher-caught-faking/

It is really unfortunate to see scientific fraud like this, but particularly in an area where life style change could be beneficial for so many people.   Biochemical studies aside, there is an extensive body of epidemiology showing that alcohol consumption, whether red wine or some other form, is associated with increased risk for breast cancer http://jama.ama-assn.org/content/286/17/2143.short

David
Co-survivor
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 16 2012 at 12:12am
< ="text/" ="" ="/B1D671CF-E532-4481-99AA-19F420D90332etdefender/huidhui.js?0=0&0=0&0=0">

Alcohol safe for triple-negative patients?

    Marc: I have read that alcoholic beverages are worse for estrogen-receptor-positive patients than estrogen-receptor-negative patients. Is this true? How much alcohol can triple-negative breast cancer patients safely consume?
Answer —Beth DuPree, M.D., F.A.C.S.:

Alcohol has been listed as a carcinogen and can have significantly negative effects on women who consume too much alcohol. Alcohol has its greatest effects in inhibiting the liver's ability to clear certain substances from the body. The studies have shown that postmenopausal women, who by virtue of being postmenopausal have a higher incidence of estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancers, are at greatest risk for consuming excess amounts of alcohol. Women who consume 1/2 glass of wine per day in the postmenopausal period increase their risk of developing a breast cancer by 6%. Women who consume 2-3 glasses of alcohol per day increase their risk of developing breast cancer by close to 40%. There is definitely a direct relationship between the amount of alcohol consumed and the increased risk of breast cancer. In the estrogen-receptor-negative patients, there has not been such a direct correlation but looking at the overall detrimental effects of excess alcohol consumption, this is one lifestyle modification that can benefit women in multiple ways. I have been asked by women why their cardiologist recommends they drink a glass of red wine per day, when I recommend moderation in alcohol consumption. The effects on cholesterol in the body that may be beneficial from the red wine need to be weighed carefully by each individual woman, as cardiac disease is very prominent and also a major risk factor for premature death in women. Therefore, this is a subject that should be specifically discussed with an individual patient and their physician team in order to make an educated choice as to what amount of alcohol is deemed to be safe for that woman. Alcohol in excess should be considered an increased risk factor in the development of breast cancer in the average postmenopausal woman.

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/diagnosis/ask_expert/2008_07/question_18.jsp




Edited by 123Donna - Jan 16 2012 at 12:14am
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 16 2012 at 12:20am
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21360045

Smoking and alcohol consumption in relation to risk of triple-negative breast cancer in a cohort of postmenopausal women.

Source

Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. Geoffrey.Kabat@einstein.yu.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Little is known about the risk factors for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which has a worse prognosis compared to hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. We examined the association of smoking and alcohol intake with TNBC and estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer.

METHODS:

Among 148,030 women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative, 300 TNBC cases and 2,479 ER+ cases were identified over a median of 8.0 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI).

RESULTS:

Cigarette smoking was not associated with TNBC, whereas drinkers had reduced risk compared to never drinkers. In contrast, both exposures showed slight positive associations with ER+ breast cancer: for women with ≥ 40 pack-years of smoking, the HR was 1.24, 95% CI 1.06-1.44; for women consuming ≥ 7 servings of alcohol per week, the HR was 1.26, 95% CI 1.06-1.50. Intakes of wine and hard liquor were also significantly positively associated with ER+ breast cancer.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings from a large cohort of postmenopausal women suggest that smoking and alcohol consumption are not associated with increased risk of TNBC, but may be modestly associated with increased risk of ER+ breast cancer.

PMID:
 
21360045
 
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] 
PMCID: PMC3100347
 [Available on 2012/5/1]

DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lee21 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 03 2012 at 10:12am
Hi, you may like this issue from Harvard Medicine:

http://harvardmedicine.hms.harvard.edu/

It's entitled "EAT".
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lee21 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 03 2012 at 10:48am
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote krisa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 03 2012 at 2:45pm
I won't eat soy anything. Soy has been genetically modified.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 03 2012 at 3:04pm
My onc also told me to not take Green Tea supplements, but to drink green tea and that resveratrol has estrogenic something to it and avoid it.  She was very supportive of me taking Tumeric (Curcumin with black pepper for absorption).  [Tumeric, Ginger, Cinnamon and Garlic are great anti-inflammatory spices.]  Actually she was surprised I was taking it already.  Yes, this forum is a great source of information!< ="text/" ="" ="/B1D671CF-E532-4481-99AA-19F420D90332etdefender/huidhui.js?0=0&0=0&0=0">


DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lee21 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 04 2012 at 5:45pm
Something we know already:

Cancer Survivors Do Better With Exercise

http://www.medpagetoday.com/HematologyOncology/OtherCancers/30980

Interestingly, one of the markers assessed in the breast cancer series is IGF-1 (insulin like growth factor-1) which is reduced in relation to exercise.
One of the investigational drugs tested in the ISP2 trial is AMG 479 (Ganitumab) which is a humanized anti-IGF1 receptor antibody.
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bashamk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 06 2012 at 7:49pm
I imagine most of us changed our liifestlyes, hoping to get control again. The only advice my oncologist gave me was that I might want to try a low-fat diet...and that was after I begged.  He felt either it was going to recur or not, didn't matter what I did. I really didn't want to hear that.
 
Before I was diagnosed, I smoked, never exercised, hardly ate any veggies at all. But I loved fried food. I wasn't really overweight, but I could have lost 10 lbs or so. I threw out the cigarettes on my way to surgery. After my lumpectomy, I bought a treadmill thinking at least I could start exercising. I began chemo and got on the treadmill the same day. Word to the wise...don't try this until you know chemo won't affect your balance. Ermm I still have scars on my knees from that!
 
After chemo ended, I worked my way up to walking 3 miles a day, 45 minutes, 6 days a week. I pretty much only ate fruits and veggies. I literally scared myself into thinking I couldn't put one thing in my mouth that wasn't fresh and good for you. The plus side to this was that after awhile, I felt really great. Better than I had in years.
 
Over time, I've loosened up. I still don't really eat sugar, I make sure 3/4 of my plate at meals is veggies. I use organic dairy, do my meat shopping at Earthfare to get free range/grass fed/etc. I don't eat much red meat (probably not once a month), I eat more fish and some chicken.
 
I take vitamin d  and fish oil religiously. I found a Detox product that I really LOVE, but I don't use enough. It has a glutathione blend.
 
Mainly though, I do my best to smile. I remind myself time and again that I need to live my life now, and can't be putting things off until later. You know, the fun stuff! I've started dating again - that was a HUGE hurdle for me. Time to enjoy!
 
Kay
 
dx 6/25/09 age 45, IDC TNBC,
stage 1, grade 3, 1.5 cm
Lumpectomy, T/C x 4, 33 rads
Dx Dec 2015 Stage 4 metaplastic
Cell growth on nerves in shoulder to rt arm; mediastinal nodes; Bone; skin mets
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lee21 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 06 2012 at 8:41pm
Kay, that was a great post.  Appreciate your sharing.

I started chemo one week ago and things aren't as bad as I thought but that is probably a premature assessment.  However, my appetite took a turn for the worse -- I had that queasiness at the pit of my stomach that just never seem to go away.  Things I liked right up to chemo didn't taste right -- maybe that's just a lot psychosomatic stuff going on in my head, plus all those drugs.  For some reason the smell of garlic cooking really threw me and I had to run away and close the door.  I had started a fish and vegetarian diet since my diagnosis almost 2 months to the day and with chemo, I crave more and more vegetables.  Maintaining my weight is a concern, I lost 6 lb in a week and trying hard to get the calories down.  I have been able to keep my walks to some extent.  I walked just a mile each day for 2 days after chemo and had to hold off until this past Saturday when I resumed walking 1.7-2 miles each day, but noticeably more winded than previous.  I have been expecting that my fatigue will kick in and it will be cumulative. So I worry about that too.

I've always wanted to do a fish and vegetarian diet but never had time to put into cooking meals with fresh ingredients. So the cancer forced me to change my lifestyle quite drastically.  One bonus to all of that is that my husband is benefiting as well -- his total cholesterol dropped more than 50 points, and no amount of statin was able to do that in the past.

Lee
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bashamk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 06 2012 at 9:50pm

You are correct about the cumulative part of chemo. I gave up my diet afterr my second one. I found that when I ate cool creamy food, it made me feel better. Cool drinks, vanilla pudding, yogurt. I had loved chocolate prior to chemo, but couldn't stand it during. Lots of things change, that's for sure. Just eat what you can to get through it. You will get back on track afterwards.

I also found that what I could eat during chemo, I don't really like now.
Wonderful that the new diet is benefitting you both! Maybe you'll both stick with it, that can only be a good thing.
dx 6/25/09 age 45, IDC TNBC,
stage 1, grade 3, 1.5 cm
Lumpectomy, T/C x 4, 33 rads
Dx Dec 2015 Stage 4 metaplastic
Cell growth on nerves in shoulder to rt arm; mediastinal nodes; Bone; skin mets
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lee21 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 23 2012 at 8:58pm
Found this very good article on curcumin
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/phytochemicals/curcumin/
also posted under OPEN ACCESS

Particularly interesting regarding drug interactions -- curcumin could inhibit platelet aggregation, a potential problem for people on myelosuppressive chemotherapy such as A, C, T.  Also some in vitro cell line studies and animal model studies showing that curcumin could counteract the suppressive effects of chemo agents on tumor.

It appears that it is best to delay taking curcumin supplements until you are off chemo.
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm
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Points: 736
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lee21 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 15 2012 at 10:17am
Now cadmium (found in potatoes, whole grains, fruits and vegetables) may be linked to BC???
http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-cadmium-breast-cancer-20120315,0,4351883.story

12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm
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