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    Posted: Dec 31 2016 at 6:55am
I was dx Nov 29 and have spent a month doing additional testing so the doctors could develop a treatment plan. I have stage 2b, trip neg, BRCA!+ BC. The treatment plan is to do chemo then a bilateral mastectomy. I am scheduled for port placement and node biopsy on Tuesday and chemo starts Friday. AHHHHH Unhappy This is scary. The first 12 weeks are carboplatin/taxol rotation, 2 weeks off then 8 weeks A/C every other week. To say I am scared is an understatement. I am afraid of what this is going to do to me. I am a single mother of 2 very active teenagers and have been very active in school and community activities. I have no family in town (besides the kids) so I have to depend on my friends for help. I have always been the one giving the help to others. I don't know how to be on the other side.  Everyone keeps telling me it will be ok, and they have a friend who went though it and did just fine, took their chemo and you would never know they were sick, Etc.That drives me nuts for some reason. My mind is spinning.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Tulips Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 31 2016 at 8:47am
Hi ScrapHappy,

Something about the way you write makes me feel sure you will get through this with flying colors!  Of course it's so scary, but it is very do-able.

I had a 2.2 cm tumor (BRCA negative), with lymphovascular invasion but negative nodes.  I did a very similar treatment course as you are following (Taxol & Carbo followed by AC).  The carboplatin is known to be extra helpful to BRCA positive women, so I have a good feeling that you will have wonderful results from chemo.  I then did lumpectomy plus radiation, and then ended up adding on some chemo in the form of a pill (Xeloda) that was very mild, because I did not have a complete response.  I'm all done with treatment; April will be 2 years since diagnosis, and I am feeling amazing and positive.

I found the chemo to be WAY easier than I expected.  I was never nauseous, and I didn't have to cancel anything.  I too have teens (they were 14 and 15 when I was diagnosed and I was 44) and am very involved in our schools and community, plus I teach a little at a university.  My MO encouraged me to take a semester off, so I did.  Of course I continued with my volunteer activities and community/school participation.  I ended up regretting not teaching that semester because I would have been FINE doing it and I enjoy it.  But maybe it was good--I did spend extra time focusing on myself to make sure I ate super-well and exercised every single day.  I think the exercise helped me to feel MUCH better and paradoxically gave me way more energy.  Plus I took a fun painting class that semester.

My biggest side effects related to my blood counts, which were unusually low.  This can cause fatigue (esp. the low red blood cells).  It is true that I went to bed about an hour or 2 earlier than usual, and at times I got winded climbing my stairs!  I live in a flat, coastal town, and I still was able to walk 5-8 miles per day, but when I encountered one of our few, mild hills, I was totally breathless ;-).  I also biked (typically 15 miles), but did not set any speed records!!  So anyway, tiredness/fatigue was probably my biggest issue, but not really a big problem.  I also fainted several times/had a vaso-vagal response, I think because of blood issues, but I learned to sit down when the feeling came over me and then it would pass.

For me, Taxol was easier than AC in terms of nausea.  I don't think I had any nausea at all during Taxol, but during AC I typically had one bad day (2 days post-chemo) each cycle.  But even on these "bad" days, I still went out and met friends for coffee, or went walking, or did things with my kids; I just didn't enjoy how I felt those days.  The rest of the cycle was much better.

Otherwise, I had minor complaints (especially dry eye, which I don't hear people talk about much, but really drove me crazy; a little neuropathy that completely cleared up later; taste changes which were annoying but went away; and of course hair loss which totally s*cks, but now that I'm over a year past final AC chemo, no one would know although I miss my long hair and can't wait for it to be all back.  Maybe a few other things).  

But I was happily surprised that I could continue with basically all of my activities (although I had a perfect excuse to bow out of anything I didn't want to do, ha ha ha).  My kids were amazing and really stepped it up in being helpful.  I actually think that as much as I hated my kids going through this, it has helped them become even more wonderful, sympathetic, caring people--and they have helped other teens who more recently had sick parents, which has made me proud.  Character-building for them, it's not all negative.

The port placement was easy.  I think it was sore for about a week after, and I was nervous that feeling would last,but it went away.

My friends wanted to set up a meal rotation for me, but I didn't let them and I didn't need it.  I kept saying, "wait until I don't feel well and I need it."  Same with carpools and other things.  But people DO want to help, so if you need help, don't hesitate to accept it.  Since I wasn't taking real help, people were so kind and loving with flowers and other treats--it made me feel all of my blessings in technicolor.

It is impossible to predict how you will fare--you may find it easier than I did, or have a harder time.  So my best advice is to go easy on yourself and don't expect too much.  Then if you rally and get lots done, you can feel like Superwoman, but be gentle on yourself if you don't.

Good luck and keep us posted.  You sound like you have a lot of energy and are connected with your community, which will help you tremendously.

Take care,
Tulips
Dx April 2015 IDC TN 2.2 cm, Grade 3, Chemo started May 2015: Taxol/Carbo then AC, Lx with SNB Nov 2015, 33 Rad Dec 2015-Feb 2016. 6 months Capecitabine starting March 2016
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Penny View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Penny Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 31 2016 at 1:27pm
Hi There

I too am just starting this journey.  I have no idea how to post the dx results on the bottom so I will put it here.  I just met with my MO and he said I am stage 1 grade a.  I have invasive ductal carcinoma that was found on my annual mammogram right before thanksgiving.  Since it was so small and I came back with the TNBC, they recommended a lumpectomy and lymph node dissection (surgery was 12/22/16, Merry Christmas).  I am one week post surgery and just met with my MO yesterday.  He said he recommends chemo (my tumor was .6cm and he said if it was .5cm chemo would have been an option, is that true?).  Anyway, he said I need to start on chemo in two weeks after my surgery site heals up.  4 cycles of IV chemo (3 weeks apart) and then radiation.  My left breast is significantly smaller after the partial mastectomy so I think I am going to pause and do something about it before radiation (based on all that I am reading about reconstructive surgery on a radiated breast).  I have no idea what I am doing and feel that having to make fast quick decisions is compromising me.  I feel terrible about the issue of weight gain during chemo but that is really an issue for me and I know it shouldn't be and I feel so vain even speaking about it.  It makes this journey worse for me as I have always been super active, healthy and enjoy being a size 8 my entire adult life.  I am so grateful that my stage and grade are low with zero lymph node involvement but can't get past the weight gain.  My MO also said I need to separate myself from people during this treatment so I also cannot see my beloved nieces and nephews until summer (that seems so wrong to me, is he right on this advice)?  I am a strong person and feel oddly vulnerable right now (which I also do not like).  But, I do love life, am a religious person and am very thankful to God for me catching this as soon as I did.  I am grateful for everyone posting on this site as I have been reading everything.  Any advise is truly appreciated.  I want to remain positive and upbeat.  My husband has been amazing through all of this and is a bit irritated with me about the "worrying".  

Thanks for reading this and any advice is welcomed.  and If you can tell me how to add the details under the banner bar that would be GREAT. 

Tongue
DX IDC, TNBC 12/7/16 (age 55), Stage 1a Grade 2, .6cm, 0/1 nodes, Lumpectomy & node dissection 12/22/16, BRCA1&2 negative 1/23/17 Chemo TC. Chemo completed 3/28/17. 30 RADs completed 6/6/17.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tulips Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 31 2016 at 5:04pm
Hi Penny,
Welcome to the site.  It is definitely good news that it's only 6 mm!  Yes, my understanding is that there is an arbitrary cutoff at 5 mm for chemo (below 5 is it optional or not recommended; above 5 it is recommended).  They have to draw the line somewhere, but is there really that much of a difference between a 4mm tumor and a 6 mm one?  But I do think most MOs would recommend chemo above 5 mm.

As for weight gain, I actually lost weight during chemo, even though I wasn't nauseous.  I just ate very healthy (no sugar, primarily vegan, loads of veggies & fruit, only whole grains, etc), and kept up exercise.  I think the main reason people tend to gain weight has to do with what they are eating and the amount they are moving.  For many people, if they aren't feeling well and/or want to use this as a time to treat themselves, they may want to have comfort foods or whatever helps them get through treatment, and that is fine.  Many doctors will say to just make sure you eat, not to worry during chemo about what you are eating.  It can be corrected after.  But if you are really anxious about weight gain, just keep eating healthy foods.  You will have some steroids, but even if that causes weight gain, it's only temporary water weight that will go away.  If you are careful, there is no reason that you can't maintain your weight or even lose a few lbs.

As far as separating yourself from others/kids, this might depend on your situation, age, overall health.  I was 44 at diagnosis and otherwise healthy.  I did have terrible luck with my blood counts during chemo, with my white blood cells plummeting, but I never deprived myself of company.  I also took several cross country plane rides (I did wear a mask per my husband's request), kissed and hugged everyone, went to parties, etc.  I can't even say I was particularly careful about germs, and nothing bad happened.  I am NOT recommending carelessness!  But I would think if you are otherwise healthy, and you are careful about hand washing, etc, I think most MOs would encourage you to spend time with loved ones.  You might want to ask another doctor for their opinion.

It is TOTALLY normal to be "worrying".  I'm glad your husband is being supportive--that's so important--but he should know that worrying is unavoidable and it will pass. 

Good luck healing and figuring out the reconstruction options.  I am sure it will work out well.

Take care,
Tulips
Dx April 2015 IDC TN 2.2 cm, Grade 3, Chemo started May 2015: Taxol/Carbo then AC, Lx with SNB Nov 2015, 33 Rad Dec 2015-Feb 2016. 6 months Capecitabine starting March 2016
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Penny Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 31 2016 at 7:03pm
Dear Tulips

Thank you so much for the quick reply.  I really appreciate your detail.  I am so glad to hear about the management of the weight gain and the fact that I can see people.  Maybe I misunderstood what he said.  There is so much information at those sessions that that may be the case.  Do you know if the use of steroids continues after chemo?  That I forgot to ask him.  I am having a second opinion just to be careful and am actually glad the question of chemo yes/chemo no was taken out of my control.  I would have always wondered if I made the right decision.  

I am so grateful for this site, the women that have gone before me that can help and guide me.  I hope you are well and thriving.  

Best, Penny 
DX IDC, TNBC 12/7/16 (age 55), Stage 1a Grade 2, .6cm, 0/1 nodes, Lumpectomy & node dissection 12/22/16, BRCA1&2 negative 1/23/17 Chemo TC. Chemo completed 3/28/17. 30 RADs completed 6/6/17.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mainsailset Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 31 2016 at 8:46pm
Hi ladies, welcome and it's so great you came loaded with questions. I'm pretty sure everyone here shared the same 'omg I can't understand all this medical jargon and how am I supposed to make decisions' It's really awful and all I can say is that questions are your friend, even if you forget to ask them during a meeting, just keep asking. When your medical team gives you a plan of action don't be shy about asking if there is another plan that you should consider as well.

Clinical trials are also something that can be enormously important to consider.

If you need help with transportation, financial or even cleaning house you can ask your medical team if they have a 'social worker'. That person is tasked with getting you help and networking for you. Groups like Komen offer help in transportation and even a quick house cleaning. There is help out there.

As far as gaining weight, I'm with Tulips here. I lost a great deal of weight, but the important thing is to eat as healthy as you can. You may investigate some of the better protein whey drinks because they'll give you vitamins. After chemo your system is bound to be messed up. My thyroid and cholesterol were helter skelter and so don't be surprised if you find your metabolism changes and you gain weight.

Also, we've found that Vit D levels are commonly low in Tneg ladies so a good idea to get tested and then start supplementation. The D3 is the best for assimilation and I'm told is best combined with Calcium & Magnesium. We have a big thread here going that will answer just about any question you might think of.

I really believe that before a treatment plan actually happens is one of the worst time. The not knowing, the figuring out the logistics, on and on. Once the treatments start and you figure out routines things will settle down.

Last, chemo has side effects. It's a good idea to get a thermometer & a BP monitor that you can use at home. Keep track of any side effects you may have and don't be shy about calling in to the doctor, even after hours to report what's going on if you feel sick or concerned. My BP shot up dangerously. Because I had been keeping track of it, I was able to call in and get a med script on a weekend.

You've asked good questions, please ask more!
Best
   Mainy
dx 7/08 TN 14x6.5x5.5 cm tumor

3 Lymph nodes involved, Taxol/Sunitab+AC, 5/09 dbl masectomy, path 2mm tumor removed, lymphs all clear, RAD 32 finished 9/11/09. 9/28 CT clear 10/18/10 CT clear
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 31 2016 at 10:31pm
Hi Penny,

Yes, the NCCN Guidelines say that anything smaller than 5 mm, chemo is an option.  If it's 5 mm or larger, they recommend chemo.  While I agree with the guidelines, I'd caution it with TNBC, because it's more aggressive.  I've learned of some who were right at the cutoff and chose lumpectomy and radiation, but no chemo.  The cancer had spread and now stage 4.  My personal opinion (not a medical one) is to treat TNBC as aggressively as you can.  You only get one shot at this beast hoping it doesn't return.

All chemos are different.  I never had any nauseau.  I lost weight the first time, but gained weight with the recurrence.  Chemo put me into menopause and changed my metabolism.  Along with radiation, caused thyroid problems making weight loss very very difficult.  I've embraced the new normal and just try to live a healthy, happy life and not stress about the weight gain or any of the other side effects left from treatment.  Life is good.

Donna  
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 31 2016 at 10:39pm
Scraphappy,

It sounds like a good treatment plan.  The period between diagnosis and treatment is probably the worst.  Just the anxiety can be overwhelming.  I found the anticipation of everything (tests, scans, surgery, chemo, radiation) to be much worse than reality.  Once you begin treatment you will feel better that your are now actively doing something to kill this beast.  




DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tulips Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 01 2017 at 7:51am
Oh, steroids are just during chemo, none after.  Mainy & Donna raise lots of good points.
Dx April 2015 IDC TN 2.2 cm, Grade 3, Chemo started May 2015: Taxol/Carbo then AC, Lx with SNB Nov 2015, 33 Rad Dec 2015-Feb 2016. 6 months Capecitabine starting March 2016
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote snugltz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 02 2017 at 1:25am
As to being around people, I was also advised to stay away as much as possible.  Your white blood cell count drops and you can catch stuff much easier.  I had to give up babysitting my two grandchildren while on chemo.  And they don't like you to be sick because it can delay your chemo.  So I would advise you to be extra careful.  Stay away from sick people if possible.  Get rest and do what you can to keep yourself as healthy as possible.  Chemo was a rough time for me.  But I survived.  But never any nausea.  I think the Neulasta shot was the worst.  Especially the first days after the shot.  But hang on.  This too shall pass.  And you will feel you've done all you can when it is over. 
Ports are easy really. 
1 cm, 0/2 neg nodes, lumpectomy 6/16/10, cytoxin/taxotere 4x every three weeks, rad start 11/8 33X
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sunny day Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 07 2017 at 9:37am
Hello, one thing that I found very helpful with remembering all the info with doctors appointments is to voice record it on my cell phone, then if I question anything, I can go back and listen to it again. I have finished AC, Taxol Carob, surgery and radiation, my next step is Xeloda, my doctor wants me to take it for 8 months (1 week on and 1 week off). Can anyone tell me their experience with this and how they tolerated it? I'm so glad to read all the positive stories and experiences on hear! You all are so encouraging!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 07 2017 at 1:19pm
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Thank you!!!
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I'm new and not sure of what I am doing! I was diagnosed with TNBC...invasive ductal carcinoma of 2mm. Also found was a 7mm invasive lobular Hormone positive cancer. Both in the left breast. I have a strong family history of breast cancer. Mother was BRCA2+ and one sister was BRCA2+ also. Both had inflammatory breast cancer. My second sister has had 3 excisions due to atypical hyperplasia.

My med onc. said the triple negative was "so tiny" (2mm) that she didn't think I needed chemotherapy, but says I should have radiation. Also, says I should take Letrozole for the hormone receptor invasive lobular. I also have area of DCin-situ and areas of calcifications. All of this seems like so much not to have chemotherapy! I have read things on-line that Triple Negative should receive chemotherapy even if tumor is small because so aggressive. The view seems to be that TN is so aggressive. I had no node involvement. I don't want chemotherapy, but I don't want to end up in a terrible situation if there are triple negative cells left over somewhere. So confused. My doctors are with a top notch cancer institute, but another top notch hospital said TN warrants chemo. I don't know what to do. Anyone have this experience ? Thanks
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Penny Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 11 2017 at 10:03am
I am also very new to the TNBC and what I can tell you about mine is my MO said TNBC = chemo.  I have a stage 1, .6cm with no lymph involvement and chemo starts next week.  I have had a partial mastectomy so that "chemo won't be delayed by a larger surgery" - There are a few ladies on this site that have quite a bit of insight so I will let them respond to you to help you.  I can say that I spoke with my husband and he said no matter the size, if TNBC is the type, chemo will set our  mind at ease (regardless of stage and size).  

I don't blame you on not wanting chemo but if you are a worrier like me, it takes a bit of that away.  Good luck!!  

Penny 
DX IDC, TNBC 12/7/16 (age 55), Stage 1a Grade 2, .6cm, 0/1 nodes, Lumpectomy & node dissection 12/22/16, BRCA1&2 negative 1/23/17 Chemo TC. Chemo completed 3/28/17. 30 RADs completed 6/6/17.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mimi williams Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 11 2017 at 7:02pm
Oh Penny, I am so happy to hear from you. I feel so lost even though my doctors are from a really really top cancer institute. I have read so much about studies, looked at questions and answer sites like this one. I have even read "scholarly" papers on triple negative. No one comes out and says you definitely should have chemo with this type of cancer whatever the size. The TN invasive ductal tumor is only 2mm, the invasive lobular is 7mm and hormone positive. There is so much going on this one breast. BUT, I keep telling myself that this doctor should know because she is with a world class cancer institute! She said, "This tumor is tiny and I'm not going to recommend chemotherapy because that stuff is toxic"...exact words. I know it is toxic and it scares me, but what is going to happen if somewhere in my breast are microscopic TN cancer cells? Yes, the margins were clear after two surgeries and no node involvement...so why am I still so scared? Your tumor, compared to my little 2mm is so much larger. I can see without a doubt why you would have chemo.

Penny, I'm exhausted thinking about it. I'm upset that my med onc didn't tell me about testing I could have that would give me information about likelihood of lob coming back. Lob has higher rate of recurring in same breast at site of original tumor or in another area of the same breast. It also is more likely to occur in the other breast too. I ask myself if letrozole can stop all of that. I'm also concerned that I was not told that after radiation, if the cancer came back I probably would't be able to have radiation again and, in addition, high probability I couldn't have reconstruction if I ended up having to have a mastectomy. I'm 67. I'm not vain about my breast, but I think I should have been told about these things.

All the women in my family have had breast cancer except 1 sister who still has had to have three excisions for atypical hyperplasia. All cancers have been rare and very unusual. I went on the question and answer site of Johns Hopkins breast cancer site and asked questions about my case. The woman who directs the center said I should get another opinion re: chemo. She said I should get genetic testing . She also commented on the strangeness of both my sister and mother having BRCA2 mutation (both had the rare inflammatory b.c.), and I end up with a triple negative cancer. I tested negative for BRCA1&2 mutation as did my other sister. The only reason my other sister hasn't had full blown cancer is that she is watched very closely and all atypical hyperplasia has been caught and excised.

So, I am calling someone at the Johns Hopkins Hospital Breast Cancer Center Second Opinion Program tomorrow. I will keep you posted if you would like. You are so kind to contact me. I am usually very strong and in control, but all of this has become a puzzle that I have just got to solve. I'm supposed to start radiation in two to three weeks after physical therapy to regain full range of motion. Also, I have had to deal with an infection in the breast and am on second round of antibiotic...UGH.

I am always keenly aware that so so so many women are having so much more to deal with than I am...always. However, I so strongly believe that those of us with small tumors should not be under- treated with this TN cancer. I wasn't even asked how I felt about any of my treatment, and I deferred to my doctor. I just don't know what the answer is. How did you come to feel that you should have chemotherapy? Did the doctor leave it up to you? Did you have genetic testing? I feel like I have just "thrown up" all of craziness onto this message to you! I'm not always like this...Thank you so much. I hope you are dealing well.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Penny Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 12 2017 at 10:08am
Hi MiMi-

Don't you worry about all your questions and fears.  I have had the same ones.  I am not in love with my MO either (and think he feels the same way about me and the list of questions I bring in to his office for my appointments).  When my .6cm stage 1, no lymph node was the surgical path report findings, chemo was the treatment, no question.  Due to the TNBC.  The best way to prevent recurrence (for me) and say "I did everything" is surgery, chemo and radiation.  They have tested me for BRCA1/2  and if they come back positive, we pause between chemo and radiation and I have double mastectomy and removal of ovaries.  I just got my port put in on Monday and my first chemo session is 1/23/17.  You have to figure out what YOU think is best for you (and your mind).  Chemo is temporary and in my opinion will get ANY micro bead of cancer that may have possibly slipped through.  That is where I get my peace of mind, knowing I have done everything possible to save my life.  I hope this helps you.  

Let me know what you decide!  

Penny 
DX IDC, TNBC 12/7/16 (age 55), Stage 1a Grade 2, .6cm, 0/1 nodes, Lumpectomy & node dissection 12/22/16, BRCA1&2 negative 1/23/17 Chemo TC. Chemo completed 3/28/17. 30 RADs completed 6/6/17.

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snugltz View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snugltz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 12 2017 at 1:04pm
Hopefully Donna will get back with you or Steve.  They are the most knowledgeable I think.  But for TN from what I have read and many others on here have said the cut off is .5mm.  Under...no chemo...over chemo.  Check other forums on here.  I know its been written about more than once.  You do have other complications with the other cancers and whatnot.  Your second opinion should help you decide. 
1 cm, 0/2 neg nodes, lumpectomy 6/16/10, cytoxin/taxotere 4x every three weeks, rad start 11/8 33X
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mimi williams View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mimi williams Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 12 2017 at 4:22pm
Hi Snugltz-

Thank you so much for your message. I knew the "cutoff" was 5mm, but the first med onc I saw (at top Boston hospital) said chemo no question. The second (top cancer institute) med onc said no. You are right about pointing out that two cancers (the other ILOB is 8mm) and family history might make my situation a little more "complicated". I have called Johns Hopkins (super b.c. center and terrific question/answer forum with breast onc. R.N. and professor at the school) second opinion program coordinator and have decided to get a third opinion from them...to break the tie...HA! They are top hospital so their info. will probably decide for me. I also have made an appointment for 19th to meet with a genetics counselor and have testing. I want to not only do this for myself but for my sister who has had lots of excisions due to atypical hyperplasia and my daughter.I didn't know about new developments in gene testing for breast cancer and I'm concerned that strs. didn't tell me considering there are gene mutations of BRCA 2 for mother and sister. I hope to find out something and find some peace. Yours and Penny's messages mean so much. Thanks.
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