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Is gene Sox10 the Master Switch for TNBC?

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    Posted: Sep 06 2018 at 12:23pm

A master switch controls aggressive breast cancer


Researchers have identified a master switch that appears to control the dynamic behavior of tumor cells that makes some aggressive cancers so difficult to treat. The gene Sox10 directly controls the growth and invasion of a significant fraction of hard-to-treat triple-negative breast cancers.

Recently, the Salk lab led by Professor Geoffrey Wahl discovered that aggressive breast cancers return to a flexible, earlier state found in fetal breast tissue. This cellular reprogramming may be the key to cancer's ability to form new cell types, evolve drug resistance and metastasize to other locations in the body. The new work documenting Sox10's role in this process, which was reported in the journal Cancer Cell on August 30, 2018, represents a major milestone in researchers' understanding of cancer and could open new avenues for diagnosing and treating aggressive breast cancer as well as other types of intractable cancers.

"Two things that make triple-negative breast cancers so hard to treat are their heterogeneity -- they have many different cell types within a single tumor -- and their ability to move around and colonize new areas, the process of metastasis," says Wahl, holder of the Daniel and Martina Lewis Chair and senior author of the work. "It's what you could call the imprecision in precision medicine, in the sense that we might target one type of cell, but there are other cells within the tumor that can change to become drug resistant, analogous to how a chameleon changes colors to evade predators."

To read the entire article:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180830180052.htm

DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
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