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Healthiest Diet Made Little Difference-Study

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trip2 View Drop Down
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    Posted: Jul 18 2007 at 1:53am
http://www.forbes.com/forbeslife/health/feeds/hscout/2007/07/17/hscout606477.html
 
 
"While a healthy diet remains a mainstay of cancer prevention, eating more than the recommended amounts of fruits, vegetables and fiber won't give you added protection against breast cancer, new research suggests.

This study of breast cancer survivors found no statistically significant benefit in terms of being diagnosed with breast cancer again for women who followed a diet that encouraged eating at least eight servings of vegetables and fruits, at least 30 grams of fiber, and no more than 15 percent to 20 percent of fat."

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lisa L Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 18 2007 at 1:18pm
yah hoo!  Want to go for ice cream?!!Tongue
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote trip2 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 19 2007 at 12:58am

Let's go Lisa! LOL

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HollyHopes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 21 2007 at 7:35am
Thank God - I have been blaming myself for not eating enough of the 'right' stuff and eating toomucho f the 'wrong' stuff...now I can let go of that....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Joan2844 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 24 2007 at 4:29am
Ladies,

The debate is not over.... Read on: http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/opinion/324783_badscience24.html

Breast cancer-diet study dishonest

By WILLIAM L. WEIS
GUEST COLUMNIST

Last week's Associated Press report on a poorly designed and poorly executed study on breast cancer and diet sends a false, and deadly, message to P-I readers ("High-veggie diet fails to prevent disease's return," Wednesday).

The message, that diet is not a factor in breast cancer prevention and management, is simply wrong -- dead wrong. And the "study" reporting those conclusions should never have been accepted for publication in the Journal of the American Medical Association (I encourage skeptical readers to scrutinize the article, titled "Influence of a Diet Very High in Vegetables, Fruit and Fiber and Low in Fat on Prognosis Following Treatment for Breast Cancer" -- jama.ama-assn.org/current.dtl).

The "study" randomly assigned breast cancer patients to two diets, one high in saturated fat and animal protein, and the other high in saturated fat and animal protein. Yes, you read that correctly. Both diets were high in saturated fat, both were high in animal protein, and neither was high in vegetables or fruit, despite what the title of the study suggests.

Those in the "healthy diet" group were asked to consume a daily diet comprised of "five vegetable servings, three fruit servings, 16 ounces of vegetable juice and 30 grams of fiber." For those trying to consume a healthy, balanced diet, that is a near-starvation level of vegetable and fruit consumption -- and yet the study incredulously labels this as a "very high" intake of vegetables and fruit.

The "healthy diet" group members were further asked "to get no more than 15 percent to 20 percent of their calories from fat," but they actually consumed a much higher percentage of fat calories, and much of that from saturated fat. No respectable non-aligned nutritionist (e.g., one not working for the diary industry) would consider 20 percent a "low fat" intake, even if the "healthy diet" subjects had actually been able to achieve that level (which they were not).

The study was dishonest in its design, dishonest in its execution and dishonest in its interpretation of results and implications. It did not look at cancer patients on either a low fat or high vegetable and fruit diet. It should never have claimed it did, and then exacerbate that fraud with misleading conclusions that suggest diet is an innocuous agent in cancer prevention and management. And The Associated Press should have reporters capable of discerning research quality, and not rely on the imprimatur of the JAMA. Bad science and bad journalism, especially when it applies to health, is a toxic combination.

Finally, that the JAMA reviewers and editors could be so naïve about the basic fundamentals of nutrition that they would refer to a subsistence diet of vegetables as "very high," as they do in the title to their article, goes a long way toward explaining why our population is suffering the ravages of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and, yes, breast cancer.

William L. Weis is professor of management and director of the MBA Program at Seattle University's Albers School of Business and Economics.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Terry3N Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 25 2007 at 10:08am

I found this article when I was first diagnosed with BC and when I learned I was triple negative it gave me hope for some control over the outcome.  I love my fat as well as the next person, but I am working at switching to healthier choices and eliminating the really bad ones.  I just started my cancer treatment (dx Stg IV in Feb 07, completed 4 cycles of FEC with a good result and now onto 12 rounds of weekly Taxol, surgery, radiation, and then what, I don't know)  It sure can't hurt to eat as healthy as I can without making it something to stress about.

 

NewsTarget.com printable article

Originally published February 16 2007

Low-fat diets can prevent cancer relapse

by David Gutierrez

(NewsTarget) Eating a diet low in fat may reduce a woman's risk of breast cancer relapse, according to a study published on December 20 in the "Journal of the National Cancer Institute."

Researchers studied 2,400 post-menopausal women who had been successfully treated for breast cancer, and monitored their condition for five years. The women had all previously received standard treatments for their cancer, including surgery, hormone therapy, chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

One group of women was asked to consume less than 33 grams of fat per day — 20 percent of their total calorie intake. The control group ate a standard diet of approximately 51 grams of fat per day, or 30 percent of their total daily calories. After five years, the relapse rate among those who had eaten the low-fat diet was 9.8 percent, compared with 12.4 percent for the control group — in other words, a 20 percent lower risk. The difference was statistically significant, said researchers.

When the researchers divided the breast-cancer cases depending on whether or not the tumors contained receptors for estrogen hormones, a different pattern emerged. Among those with estrogen-receptor-negative tumors, women who ate the low-fat diet had a 41 percent lower risk of recurrence. Preliminary results suggested that this difference became even more drastic when the observation period was extended past five years. Among those with estrogen-receptor-positive tumors, however, a low-fat diet produced no statistically significant difference in relapse risk.

The study could not determine the cause for the correlation between reduced fat intake and reduced risk.

Prior studies have shown a correlation between obesity and breast cancer risk, such that gaining 22 pounds can increase person's risk of contracting breast cancer by 18 percent.

The recurrence study — called the Women's Intervention Nutrition Study — was funded by the American Institute of Cancer Research.

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