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Atypical Breast Abnormalites Recommendation

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123Donna View Drop Down
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    Posted: Jan 31 2014 at 10:42am

Recommendations on breast abnormalities 'may need to be revised'

A new study, published in the American Association for Cancer Research's journal Cancer Prevention Research, challenges the current recommendations for management of a type of breast tissue abnormality.

Atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH) has not previously been thought to progress directly to breast cancer in the same breast, although it can indicate an equal risk of breast cancer across both breasts.

Instead, it was thought that only another abnormality - atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) - could lead directly to cancer in the same breast.

Over a million women in the US have a breast biopsy that returns benign findings every year. Dr. Lynn C. Hartmann, professor of oncology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, explains:

"About 10% of these biopsies reveal atypical hyperplasia, a premalignant finding with a proliferation of abnormal cells, which have some but not all the features of a breast cancer."

Due to differences in their microscopic appearance, scientists have previously believed that the two types of atypical hyperplasia - ADH and ADL behave differently. . . . 

. . .The researchers found that both types of atypia were equally likely to progress to cancer in the breast. In the study, both ADH and ADL had a 2:1 likelihood of developing into breast cancer.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/271876.php

DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TriplePositiveGirl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 31 2014 at 12:01pm
What do they do in cases like this? Are the atypical cells removed by surgery? That seems like a high likelihood of cancer developing - that would scare me just the thought of it.
Lisa
Diagnosed Jan 2010; Stage IIa, grade 2, 3.2cm in rt. breast, no nodes and BRCA-. 4 cycles Carbo/Gemzar 3/10; Lump 6/10; 2 cycles carbo/gem after surgery 8/10; 35 Rads finished 12/1/10. NED.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 31 2014 at 12:19pm
Lisa,

I'm not sure, but they probably just watch it.  I had atypical cells but never new.  My mammograms always showed dense, fibrocystic breasts.  After diagnosis I had the typical MRI before surgery and it only showed the breast tumor.  It wasn't until I had my bilateral mastectomy and got my path report on the "good" breast that there were reports of atypical hyperplasia areas.  When I asked my breast surgeon what that meant she just said you don't need to worry about it anymore.  
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 07 2014 at 6:59pm
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 03 2015 at 1:04pm
Atypical hyperplasia linked to high lifetime risk of breast cancer

According to the research team - led by Dr. Lynn Hartman, an oncologist at the Mayo Clinic - of the more than 1 million biopsies with benign results that are performed in the US each year, atypical hyperplasia is discovered in around 10%.

It is unclear what causes atypical hyperplasia - also referred to as atypia - but it is known that the condition occurs when breast cells become abnormal in terms of size, shape, number, appearance and growth pattern.

Although the condition is not a form of breast cancer, it does incorporate some of the characteristics seen in the early stages of the disease. As such, past studies have indicated that women with atypical hyperplasia may be four to five times more likely to develop breast cancer than those with normal breast cells.

However, Dr. Hartman and her team note that few studies have investigated the "absolute risk" of a woman with atypical hyperplasia developing breast cancer - that is, their likelihood of developing the disease over a specific time period.

Risk of breast cancer increased 1% each year from time of biopsy

With this in mind, the researchers analyzed 698 women who had been diagnosed with atypical hyperplasia after undergoing breast biopsies at the Mayo Clinic between 1967 and 2001.

Fast facts about breast cancer

  • Around 232,670 new cases of breast cancer were diagnosed in the US in 2014
  • Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death in American women
  • There are currently more than 2.8 million breast cancer survivors in the US.

Learn more about breast cancer

The researchers assessed the women's medical records and monitored their atypia pathology. In addition, all women completed follow-up health questionnaires, from which the researchers were able to gather information on any breast cancer diagnoses.

Over an average follow-up period of 12.5 years, 143 women had developed breast cancer.

On analyzing the women's absolute risk of breast cancer from the time of biopsy, they found that it increased by more than 1% each year; 7% of women had developed the disease after 5 years, 13% had developed it after 10 years, while 30% developed breast cancer 25 years after biopsy.

The researchers note that similar results were found in a separate cohort of women with atypia, assessed by investigators from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN.

Women with atypia should be recognized as having a high lifetime risk of breast cancer

In addition, the team applied information from patients' pathology specimens to the absolute risk results, with the aim of reaching more accurate risk estimates.

They found that a woman's risk of breast cancer increased along with the intensity of atypia in a patient's biopsy - determined by the amount of separate clusters of abnormal breast cells.

In the case of women with three or more clusters of abnormal breast cells in their biopsies, for example, 47% had developed breast cancer 25 years after biopsy, compared with only 24% of women who had one cluster.

These findings, the researchers say, indicate that women with atypical hyperplasia should be acknowledged as having a high lifetime risk of breast cancer and should undergo regular screening for the disease.

The team also points out that these women should be prescribed anti-estrogen medications - such as tamoxifen - which have been shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer in women with atypia by at least 50%.

Dr. Hartman adds:

"By providing better risk prediction for this group, we can tailor a woman's clinical care to her individual level of risk.

We need to do more for this population of women who are at higher risk, such as providing the option of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) screenings in addition to mammograms and encouraging consideration of anti-estrogen therapies that could reduce their risk of developing cancer."

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/287536.php?tw

DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote qrika Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 12 2019 at 10:10am
Many times specially ladies face problem of fibrocrystic breast. It is problem in which women breast change shape. It also known as lumpy breast.
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