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Are you Androgen + ?

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mainsailset View Drop Down
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    Posted: Jun 05 2012 at 11:08pm
dx 7/08 TN 14x6.5x5.5 cm tumor

3 Lymph nodes involved, Taxol/Sunitab+AC, 5/09 dbl masectomy, path 2mm tumor removed, lymphs all clear, RAD 32 finished 9/11/09. 9/28 CT clear 10/18/10 CT clear
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Grateful for today Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 19 2012 at 12:18pm

Mainy,

Thanks for posting the above article.

Regarding your question about androgen testing: never been tested.
Wondering if the reason for no androgen testing related to:
          88 percent of estrogen-positive breast cancers, 50 percent of HER2+ breast cancers
          but only 25 percent of triple-negative breast cancers are androgen-positive (per article)???
Wondering after this androgen information was presented at the June 2012 American Society of
        Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago, there will be more studies/articles on this?

With caring and positive thoughts,
Grateful for today.......Judy


Addendum:
There is a clinical trial for those with residual disease after neoadjuvant chemo (and it is
within 2 years of surgery) AND androgen receptor positive. Trial started June 2012.
See:   http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01612910?term=triple+negative+breast+cancer++++residual+disease&rank=1

Addendum on 8/8/12:
Clinical trial NCT01612910 is now suspended.   Drugs unavailable.

Edited by Grateful for today - Aug 08 2012 at 3:36pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote denise07 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 21 2012 at 1:47am
Acorriding to my path reports I was never tested. Is this something new/ and so how does it benifit? I don't know where to turn any more this is so over whelming.
DX Idc 10/07,st2,gr3,2/6 lymphnodes
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dmwolf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 21 2012 at 7:49pm
Denise, this only matters if you are having a recurrence and are interested in trying an anti-androgen drug.  Only about 10-15% of TNs are positive for androgen receptor, and none of us were tested for this years back (or even now in most places).   So don't sweat it!!
love,
Denise

DX 2/08@43 stg II IDC; gr2,0 nodes. Neoadj chemo, first ACx2 (fail) then CarboTaxotereX6(better). Lump, Rads done 11/08; Clodronate. False alarm queen: PetCT lung & TM marker. NED. PBM w/recon 9/10.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SagePatientAdvocates Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 22 2012 at 4:26pm
Dear all,

The first mention I saw about AR+ testing was at ASCO a few years ago at a presentation at ASCO by Dr. Clifford Hudis, Chief of Breast Cancer Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in NYC. The research work on treatment for folks who were AR+ at that point was generally limited to men with prostate cancer. Dr. Hudis reported on a trial for women with breast cancer who were AR+.

Denise is correct and the relative numbers are small but I believe, in my unprofessional opinion, that it may be a worthwhile exercise for our community. I would encourage, anyone interested, to ask their oncologists about getting the testing done and finding out more about the trial.


Dr. Hudis is the Investigator for the trial. He is a renowned Breast Medical Oncologist and has been elected President of ASCO for the 2013-14 term.


Dr. Tiffany Traina, also at MSKCC is the Principal Investigator of the trial. I have written several times about Dr. Traina. I have referred several patients to her and feel she is an outstanding breast medical oncologist and a wonderfully compassionate physician. She has a particular interest in TNBC and I think would be an excellent resource regarding this trial. Please note that several major cancer centers around the country are participating in the trial.


Here is a link to the paper presented at ASCO 2012, a few weeks ago, on the trial. Dr. Traina's fellow
Ayca Gucalp is 1st author and Dr. Traina was senior author-


Also, as almost everyone here is aware a clinical trial is a clinical trial i.e. there are risks and no guarantees but perhaps some folks will be helped? 

warmly,

Steve


I am a BRCA1+ grandson, son and father of women affected by breast/oc-my daughter inherited mutation from me, and at 36, was dx 2004 TNBC I am a volunteer patient advocate with SAGE Patient Advocates
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote majjers Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 08 2012 at 3:27pm
Found this post today after my Onc appointment.  We are hoping that there is enough tissue stored from my lumpectomy 5 yrs ago to do Androgen receptor testing. Turns out there isn't enough from my lung biopsy last August to be able to test.  I am on a hiatus from chemo for mets to left lung but this may be our next step if I turn out positive. It is a trial and I am a little nervous about that but will read, research and pray before making a decision.
 
Have a great day all,
Traci
dx 5/25/07, Stage 2A,TNGr3
DD 4 AC,4 Taxol
32 rads
BRCA 1&2 (-)
7/11 mets to lung; Too many lines of chemo to list! The saga continues but only GOD numbers my days!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mainsailset Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 12 2012 at 11:07am
Traci, I'm going to keep my fingers crossed that this is something that will work in your case. These articles that we find may not always pertain to a majority of us, but my thinking is that even if you're the lone soldier out there that finds this, tests positive and enters a trial that is successful nothing else matters.
Best of luck to you,
Mainy
 
dx 7/08 TN 14x6.5x5.5 cm tumor

3 Lymph nodes involved, Taxol/Sunitab+AC, 5/09 dbl masectomy, path 2mm tumor removed, lymphs all clear, RAD 32 finished 9/11/09. 9/28 CT clear 10/18/10 CT clear
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 11 2012 at 7:53am
Bump
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote majjers Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 11 2012 at 1:57pm
Results:  Not Androgen +.  Back to the drawing board...
dx 5/25/07, Stage 2A,TNGr3
DD 4 AC,4 Taxol
32 rads
BRCA 1&2 (-)
7/11 mets to lung; Too many lines of chemo to list! The saga continues but only GOD numbers my days!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote nancykind Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 19 2012 at 1:55am
i was told androgen testing isn't protocol yet so it wasn't being done (at my hospital).   my surgeon would have liked to have seen it done though.
Lg lump never visible on any films but found 9mm. Lump 1/25/12, DX 1/31@50yrs IIIC/TN/DCIS/INV, Margins Unclr, Ki67 40%,Gr2. MX L 2/24. 3.1cm total. 11/17nodes. AC/T 2xWk,33rads. 12/12 MX R. 9/13 NED!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 06 2012 at 8:24am

Prostate Cancer Drug Shows Promise In Triple-Negative And Estrogen-Positive Breast Cancer

Breast cancers are defined by their drivers - estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR) and HER2 are the most common, and there are drugs targeting each. When breast cancer has an unknown driver, it also has fewer treatment options - this aggressive form of breast cancer without ER, PR or HER2, which was thought not to be driven by hormones, is known as triple negative. A decade ago, work at the University of Colorado Cancer Center added another potential driver to the list - the androgen receptor - and this week marks a major milestone in a clinical trial targeting this cause of breast cancer growth. 

In fact, 75 percent of all breast cancers and about 20 percent of triple negative cancersare positive for the androgen receptor. Blocking the androgen receptor may stop the growth of some triple negative breast cancers - these aggressive cancers for whichchemotherapy, radiation, surgery and hope have long been the only treatments. 

"This work is a concise example of modern cancer science in action. We noticed something in the clinic, worked on it in the lab, and now are happy to report the lab work is once again back in the clinic where it has the very real potential to benefit patients," says Anthony Elias, MD, breast cancer program director at CU Cancer Center. 

The work started in 2001 when Elias took the clinical observation of estrogen-positive breast cancers that responded poorly or only very temporarily to estrogen-blocking treatments, to colleague Jennifer Richer, PhD, co-director of the CU Cancer Center Tissue Processing and Procurement Core. In these cases, something else was driving the cancer. What was the pathway? Richer showed that it was the androgen receptor. 

Androgens including testosterone have long been implicated as a driver of prostate cancer and so drugs targeting both the body's production of androgens and cancer cells' ability to use the hormone were already in the development pipeline. Richer started with cell culture and animal model work on a then-experimental drug by the company Medivation known as MDV-3100. 

"Normally, the way these hormones work is by attaching to receptors in the cell cytoplasm, at which point the receptor draws itself and the hormone molecule inside the nucleus where it regulates genes," Richer says. The genes regulated by these hormones tell breast cancer cells to survive and reproduce beyond control. The drug MDV-3100, now known as Enzalutamide, which recently gained FDA approval for use with prostate cancer, makes androgen receptors unable to go into a cell's nucleus - and so the message of growth never gets delivered. 

"Interestingly, it seems that estrogen-positive breast cancers are susceptible to the same drug," Richer says, explaining that something about the way the signal of estrogen is transmitted inside a cell's nucleus requires the (counterintuitive) presence of androgen receptors in the nucleus, too. 

And so Enzalutamide has many potential uses in the treatment of breast cancer: as a first-line drug against androgen receptor-positive cancers with or without additional hormonal drivers, as a second-line drug against tumors that have mutated away from estrogen- or HER2-dependence by adopting androgen-dependence, in combination with drugs that target these other hormones to disallow cancer from mutating toward androgen-dependence in the first place, or perhaps in addition to or instead of existing treatments for estrogen-positive breast cancers - which seem susceptible to this anti-androgen therapy. 

This week, after seeing, "no additional toxicities," Elias expects an ongoing Phase I clinical trial of Enzalutamide for triple-negative breast cancers to flip to a Phase II trial - from proving safety to demonstrating results. In addition to the CU Cancer Center, the trial is being offered at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the Karmanos Cancer Institute. Richer and Elias will present additional findings from their work with androgen-positive breast cancer at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium in December and will hear about a major invited grant proposal to the U.S. Department of Defense the same month. 

"It's an exciting time for breast cancer research," Elias says. "We should know soon if we have a viable new target in breast cancer treatment." 

Along with validating a new target, Richer and Elias may soon provide a powerful new treatment for breast cancers that evade current therapies.
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mainsailset Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 06 2012 at 9:33am
Wow Donna, that's a two-fer news. Great that they made the discovery and GREAT that there's a Trial already in place that may get bumped to a phase II.
 
I was thinking again as I read that with all the research that is ongoing I hope that those biopsy samples and tumors are kept for a good long time for us so that they might be revisited as these questions come up and we need to be re evaluated.
dx 7/08 TN 14x6.5x5.5 cm tumor

3 Lymph nodes involved, Taxol/Sunitab+AC, 5/09 dbl masectomy, path 2mm tumor removed, lymphs all clear, RAD 32 finished 9/11/09. 9/28 CT clear 10/18/10 CT clear
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote overwhelmed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 06 2012 at 9:49am
Thank you Donna for this article.  A couple of things have made me wonder why they aren't testing all tumors for androgen receptor.  Ten to 15% may not be a huge number, but they need to identify who benefits from what chemo in the six+ subsets of TNBC.  If they don't identify who is in what subset, they won't figure out which chemo is the best treatment.  If they are going to make the progress we need them to make in TNBC, it would seem to me that they need to figure out who is in what subset and not that we are just TNBC. 
That's what I think anyway.  I am sure there is much that I don't know about why this doesn't happen on a routine basis, but it would seem that the more information they have the quicker they will solve the puzzle or at least one piece of it.
DX ILC TNBC 3/10 at 50, Stage IIb; Grade 3; 5.1 to 7 cm,SNB neg;TC-6 rnds, 30 rads, Avastin-18 rnds, BRAC 1&2-
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 06 2012 at 10:23am
I'm puzzled also.  Yes, we know TNBC has at least 6 or 7 sub-types so why aren't they testing for the ones they know about?  At least this subset could benefit from targeted therapy.

Donna


DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote overwhelmed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 06 2012 at 10:38am

Having taken Avastin I was very aware of the controversy surrounding it.  It does seem to work for a group of TNBC, but not for others.  Could it be that those it worked for were part of a particular sub-set? We may never know and a drug that had promise for a small group is now very difficult to get. 

 
I believe that some day Triple Negative will become Quadruple Negative and so on.  I just wish that day would come sooner rather than later because that would mean that a group of us would have a targeted therapy.  I guess I was just shocked that the androgen receptor was identified ten years ago and still not many of us have been tested for it, and even fewer at the time of diagnosis.
DX ILC TNBC 3/10 at 50, Stage IIb; Grade 3; 5.1 to 7 cm,SNB neg;TC-6 rnds, 30 rads, Avastin-18 rnds, BRAC 1&2-
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 16 2013 at 8:50pm
Only about 20-32 percent of triple negative breast cancers test positive for Androgens.
 
Overwhelming Evidence Adds A Major New Target In Breast Cancer: Androgens Including Testosterone
Estrogen and progesterone receptors, and the gene HER2 - these are the big three markers and/or targets in breast cancer. Evidence presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2013 adds a fourth: androgen receptors. 

"This is a continuing line of work with all evidence pointing toward the addition of the androgen receptor as potential target and useful marker in all of the major subtypes of breast cancer," says Jennifer Richer, PhD, investigator at the University of Colorado Cancer Center and co-director of the CU Cancer Center Tissue Processing and Procurement Core. 

The finding of androgen receptors (AR) as a potential target in breast cancer is especially important in light of its prevalence in breast cancers that don't express other hormone receptor targets or have developed resistance to treatments that target estrogen dependence. Overall, approximately 77 percent of breast cancers are positive for AR, including 88 percent of cancers that are estrogen receptor positive, 59 percent of those that are HER2 positive, and 20-32 percent of triple negative breast cancers. 

The study presented this week explores the ability of estrogen-positive (ER+) breast cancers to develop resistance to anti-estrogen drugs by potentially developing an alternative addiction to AR - and hypothesizes that anti-androgen therapy, such as the drug enzalutamide (formerly MDV3100) as successful counters to breast cancers' evolution. First, Richer and colleagues used breast cancer tumor registries to discover that cancers with higher ratios of AR to ER protein had shorter time to relapse after anti-estrogen therapies. Cut off from their estrogen addition, these cancers may have turned to growth and survival via androgens instead. 

The group then returned to the lab to explore the effects of anti-androgen therapies in cell lines and preclinical models. 

"Remarkably, the anti-androgen drug enzalutamide had effects comparable to the anti-estrogen drug tamoxifen in breast cancer cells that expressed both ER and AR," Richer says. HER2 cell lines that were also AR+ showed promising responses as well. 

"We are excited to move toward clinical trials of anti-androgen therapies in breast cancer," Richer says. "And this study shows that patients with a high AR/ER ratio who relapse while on estrogen targeting therapies might be good candidates for this kind of therapy." 
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 26 2013 at 11:27pm

Safety and Efficacy Study of Enzalutamide in Patients With Advanced, Androgen Receptor-Positive, Triple Negative Breast Cancer

This study is currently recruiting participants.
Verified August 2013 by Medivation, Inc.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Astellas Pharma Inc
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Medivation, Inc.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01889238
First received: June 26, 2013
Last updated: August 5, 2013
Last verified: August 2013
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine if enzalutamide is safe and effective in the treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer that express the androgen receptor but do not express the estrogen or progesterone receptor and are not Her2 amplified.


DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote arabella Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 27 2013 at 11:21pm
So interesting!  Wonder what the SEs will be? 
Kaye
Dx TNBC 1/2013; age 63; 1.1 cm; Stage 1, Grade 1(?); lumpectomy clear margins; ALND -; severe SEs to first TC and treatment stopped; radsX25; BRCA -
Recur 6/2015 Mastectomy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct 03 2013 at 2:14pm

$5.9 million grant adds androgen receptor as a new driver and target in breast cancer

A major Department of Defense grant to researchers Jennifer Richer, PhD, and Anthony Elias, MD, at the University of Colorado Cancer Center aids development of drugs that target androgen receptors as a driver of breast cancer.

In August 2013, patient Linda Griffin failed her second aromatase inhibitor. Three and a half years ago, she had been diagnosed with estrogen-positive (ER+) metastatic breast cancer and with August's news she was running out of hormonal therapies.

"My oncologist had been a resident at the University of Colorado and so when my treatment failed, he said it was time to call Dr. Elias," Griffin says.

Anthony Elias, MD, is breast cancer program director at CU Cancer Center and the clinician side of a clinician-researcher team with Jennifer Richer, PhD, associate professor of pathology and co-director of the CU Cancer Center Tissue Processing and Procurement Core. Together, Richer and Elias have spent a decade laying the groundwork for targeting androgen receptors in breast cancer. Now the team expects this major Department of Defense grant will allow them to place androgen receptors alongside those for estrogen and progesterone as hormonal drivers of breast cancer, and a target for drugs that treat the disease.

"Breast cancers have addictions," says Elias. "Some are addicted to estrogen, some to progesterone, some depend on the growth factor HER2. You use drugs to take away these things the cancer needs and the cancer can't grow."

Unfortunately, when doctors use drugs to take away, for example, estrogen from an ER+ tumor, it can eventually develop a new addiction. And not all cancers are addicted to ER, PR or HER2 – the three common drivers targeted by current tests and treatments – in which case the breast cancer is called "triple negative." In fact, 75 percent of all breast cancers and about 20 percent of triple negative cancers are positive for the androgen receptor. Richer and Elias show that inhibiting androgen receptors in these androgen receptor-positive (AR+) tumors can stop their growth in almost exactly the same way that doctors have used anti-estrogen therapies with ER+ tumors.

"Our preclinical work is extremely promising and we're just now starting to get results from studies in models of breast cancers resistant to current therapies. If this promising work leads to good clinical results, we could offer a new treatments for breast cancer patients who have previously been without further options," Richer says.

Dr. Elias's patient, Linda Griffin, puts it another way: "If this works, it'll make history," she says.

Androgen is not a new target in cancer. Androgens including testosterone have long been implicated as a driver of prostate cancer and so many drugs targeting both the body's production of androgens and cancer cells' ability to use the hormone are already approved, with even more treatments in the drug development pipeline. The current clinical trial uses the especially promising anti-androgen drug, Enzalutamide, which was FDA-approved in August 2012 for use in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

"Normally, the way these hormones work is by attaching to receptors in the cell cytoplasm, at which point the receptor draws itself and the hormone molecule inside the nucleus where it regulates many genes," Richer says. The genes turned on and off by ER, PR, HER2 or, now, androgen tell breast cancer cells to survive and reproduce beyond control. Enzalutamide makes androgen receptors unable to go into a cell's nucleus – and so the message of growth never gets delivered.

"Interestingly, it seems that estrogen-positive breast cancers are susceptible to the same drug," Richer says, explaining that something about the way the signal of estrogen is transmitted inside a cell's nucleus requires the presence of androgen receptors in the nucleus, as well. Without androgen receptors in the nucleus, estrogen receptors may not be able to drive cancer, either.

And so anti-androgen therapies have many potential uses in the treatment of breast cancer, including the following:

  • as a first-line drug against androgen receptor-positive cancers with or without additional hormonal drivers
  • as a second-line drug against tumors that have mutated away from estrogen or progesterone or HER2 dependence by adopting androgen-dependence
  • in combination with drugs that target estrogen receptors and HER2 to prevent cancer from mutating toward androgen-dependence in the first place
  • perhaps in addition to or instead of existing treatments for ER+ breast cancers, which seem susceptible to this anti-androgen therapy.

Blocking androgen receptors may even stop the growth of some triple negative breast cancers – these aggressive cancers for which chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and hope have long been the only treatments.

"These uses and combinations are exactly what this grant will allow us to study," Elias says. "It is very difficult to get grants of this size in this climate and so we're absolutely honored to have the opportunity to push forward aggressively with our work. We'll be able to go back to the lab to ensure that in future clinical trials, everyone who could benefit from the drug, gets it."

In addition to the CU Cancer Center, this first clinical trial is being offered at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the Karmanos Cancer Institute. Results should be available in fall 2014, and ongoing work is likely to lead to new clinical trials as well.

For now, patient Linda Griffin will take things as they come. "I've learned not to be optimistic or pessimistic," she says. "My goal is to feel good and lead a normal life. Three weeks into this trial, I feel fabulous. That's a result to me."

Provided by University of Colorado Denver

http://phys.org/wire-news/142100942/59-million-grant-adds-androgen-receptor-as-a-new-driver-and-targ.html

DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 123Donna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 21 2014 at 9:53pm
DX IDC TNBC 6/09 age 49, Stage 1,Grade 3, 1.5cm,0/5Nodes,KI-67 48%,BRCA-,6/09bi-mx, recon, T/C X4(9/09)
11/10 Recur IM node, Gem,Carb,Iniparib 12/10,MRI NED 2/11,IMRT Radsx40,CT NED11/13,MRI NED3/15

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