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    Posted: Jan 22 2012 at 2:36pm
Hi,



Seemed a good idea to have a thread where the various abbreviations that are frequently used
on the forums are listed.
Not suggesting more abbreviations be used.
Not suggesting abbreviations be used.
Suggesting we have a list so we know what abbreviations mean.



This forum topic can be used:
       To ask what an abbreviation means if not on the list.
               Member who knows will post answer.
        To add already used abbreviations in the forums to list.
               Just post the abbreviation to be added to the list.

If we find out an abbreviation means more than one thing, will post all.
So, if you see an abbreviation listed as meaning one thing and abbreviation
       means something else to you, please post.

For simplicity and to have one list, I will try to edit the list with the new additions.
(This will mean that this initial post may have many edits)



With caring and positive thoughts to all,
Grateful for today.................Judy

____________________________________________________________________________________



ABBREVIATIONS USED ON THE TNBC FORUMS





ACA                               Affordable Care Act

ADA                               Americans with Disabilites Act

Adjuvant chemo          Chemotherapy given after surgery.

ALND                             Axillary lymph node dissection.

AND                               Axillary Node Dissection

ASCO                             American Society of Clinical Oncology

AWS                               Axillary Web Syndrome. Cording.
                                              Infrequent post surgery complication after breast surgery/ALND.

B9                                  Benign

BIRADS                          Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System score.
                                           This indicates the radiologist's opinion of the absence or
                                              likelihood of breast cancer.

BCS                                Breast Conservation Surgery

BMX                               Bilateral mastectomy

BRCA 1 /2                    Genes prone to multiple mutations found in
                                              some breast cancers. BRCA= BReast CAncer susceptibility

BSO                               Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy
                                           (removal of both tubes and ovaries)

“bump”                        When one posts on a forum, it brings the forum topic to the top of list.   
                                      Sometimes, someone will write “bump” only to bring an important forum
                                              topic to top of list.

BTW                             By The Way

Bx, BX                           Biopsy

cCR                               clinical complete response (to chemo)
                                             On clinical exam after chemo (and sometimes before chemo ended),       
                                             no mass felt.
                                           Unfortunately, a cCR does not always mean one will have a pCR.

Chemo                         Chemotherapy: see addendum below with chemo abbreviations.

CIS                                Carcinoma In Situ

CTC                             Circulating Tumor Cells

CTCAE                         Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events.
                                    CTCAE is a descriptive terminology which can be utilized for Adverse
                                    Event (AE) reporting. A grading (severity) scale is provided for each AE term.
    http://evs.nci.nih.gov/ftp1/CTCAE/CTCAE_4.03_2010-06-14_QuickReference_8.5x11.pdf

DCIS                             Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

DD                                Dose Dense (chemo given more frequently,

                                                 usually every 2 weeks)

DH                                Dear husband

DX                                Diagnosis

ER+/-                          Estrogen receptor positive/negative

FORCE                          FacingOurRiskofCancerEmpowered    http://www.facingourrisk.org/

FMLA                            Family and Medical Leave Act

FWIW                            For What It's Worth,    For Whoever Is Wondering

HER2 +/-                    Human EGF-like Receptor positive/negative

IBC                                Inflammatory Breast Cancer

IDC                               Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

IMO                             In My Opinion

IMRT                            Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

lap.                             Laparoscopic (surgery done with lapraroscope)

LAVH                           Laparoscopic assisted vaginal hysterectomy

LBBC                            LBBC.org      Living Beyond Breast Cancer website

LCIS                             Lobular Carcinoma In Situ

LE                                 Lymphedema.     Lower Extremity.

LOL                             Laughing Out Loud

LVI                               Lymphatic/vascular invasion or lymphovascular invasion

MO                             Medical Oncologist

NCI                             National Cancer Institute

NCCN                          National Comprehensive Cancer Network

NED                             No Evidence of Disease

Neoadjuvant chemo   Chemotherapy given before surgery.                 

PCP                               Primary Care Physician

pCR                             pathologic complete response (to chemo)
                                               On pathology exam of surgical specimen after neoadjuvant chemo,
                                               no cancer cells seen.      

PM                                Private message

PR+/-                          Progesterone receptor positive/negative

RADS                            Radiation. Radiation therapy

RCB                               Residual cancer burden

RNI                                Regional node irradiation.

SABC                             San Antonio Breast Conference
                                      (Yearly national/international breast cancer conference in Texas)

SE                                  Side Effects

SLB                                Sentinel lymph node biopsy

SLNB                             Sentinel lymph node biopsy

St. Gallen                     St. Gallen (Switzerland) International Breast cancer conference
                                      held every 2 years.

TAH                             Total Abdominal Hysterectomy

TAH-BSO, TAHBSO    Total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy

TE                                  Tissue Expanders

thread                           forum topic

TIA                                Thanks In Advance. Transient Ischemic Attack - mini-stroke

TM                                Tumor Markers

TMI                               Too Much Information

TNBC                            Triple negative breast cancer

TVH                             Total vaginal hysterectomy

WNL                             Within Normal Limits



                   ************



ADDENDUM WITH CHEMOTHERAPY ABBREVIATIONS



AC
Doxorubicin (Adriamycin) and Cyclophosphamide

A – CMF
Doxorubicin (Adriamycin) followed by CMFcyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), methotrexate (Amethopterin, Mexate, Folex), and 5-fluorouracil (Fluorouracil, 5-FU, Adrucil)

AC – T
Doxorubicin (Adriamycin) and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel (Taxol) or docetaxel (Taxotere). During this regimen, the targeted monoclonal antibody therapy trastuzumab (Herceptin) may be given if the tumor is HER2-positive tumor.

CAF (FAC)
Cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin (Adriamycin), and 5-fluorouracil (Fluorouracil, 5-FU, Adrucil)

CEF (FEC)
Cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, and 5-fluorouracil (Fluorouracil, 5-FU, Adrucil). This regimen also may be followed by docetaxel (Taxotere).

CMF
Cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), methotrexate (Amethopterin, Mexate, Folex), and 5-fluorouracil (Fluorouracil, 5-FU, Adrucil)

EC
Epirubicin (Ellence) and cyclophosphamide

TAC
Docetaxel (Taxotere), doxorubicin (Adriamycin), and cyclophosphamide

TC
Docetaxel (Taxotere) and cyclophosphamide

TCH
Docetaxel (Taxotere), carboplatin, and trastuzumab (Herceptin) for HER2-positive tumors


Other chemotherapy options (not abbreviations but Trade and generic names.
Besides these commonly used treatment regimens, other chemotherapy agents also are used to treat breast cancer. These include albumin-bound paclitaxel (Abraxane), capecitabine (Xeloda), cisplatin (Platinol), gemcitibine (Gemzar), ixabepilone (Ixempra), mitoxantrone (Novantrone), pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) and vinorelbine (Navelbine).



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



ABBREVIATION TIPS



If you find unknown abbreviations in a paper, look for parenthesized definitions earlier in the paper. E.g. Risk of reccurance (ROR). It is a style convention unique to biomedicine but fairly widely used in medical journals.     (courtesy of ds21/David)





-------------------------------------------------------------------------------



BREAST CANCER/CANCER DICTIONARIES



From breastcancer.org

http://www.breastcancer.org/dictionary/



From UPMC (U of Pittsburgh Medical Center) Cancer Center website:

http://www.upmccancercenter.com/dictionary/g.html



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Edited by Grateful for today - Feb 27 2013 at 12:33pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cheeks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan 22 2012 at 4:17pm
Thanks for the topic Judy. I've been wondering about a few myself.
Lump found 11/08
DX: 2/09 @52 TNBC
L. Mast. 3/26/09, SN-, BRCA-,
4.5 cm (post surgical)T2NOMO
Chemo: 4/09-10/09 Taxol x 12,
A/C x 4, No rad.No recon. NED 1/17. New Primary right breast TN, 2/2018.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Grateful for today Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 11 2012 at 11:46pm
Hi,

Just added " IMRT"    (Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy) to above abbreviation list.

From Mayo Clinic website:
Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an advanced type of three-dimensional radiation that conforms to the shape of a tumor. It uses hundreds of small radiation beams of varying intensities to precisely radiate a tumor. The radiation intensity of each beam is controlled, and the beam shape changes hundreds of times during each treatment. As a result, the radiation dose bends around healthy tissues in a way not possible with other techniques.
A link re: IMRT: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomotherapy (This link was posted by Donna
     on another thread).

One can use this thread to ask what an abbreviation means if it is not on the list.
Someone who knows what the abbreviation stands for can then post meaning.
One can post additional abbreviations and what they stand for for addition to above list.
If an abbreviation means more than one thing, will post all meanings.

Thanks.

Grateful for today...........Judy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cheeks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 12 2012 at 4:16pm
Judy, 
What is pcR?
Lump found 11/08
DX: 2/09 @52 TNBC
L. Mast. 3/26/09, SN-, BRCA-,
4.5 cm (post surgical)T2NOMO
Chemo: 4/09-10/09 Taxol x 12,
A/C x 4, No rad.No recon. NED 1/17. New Primary right breast TN, 2/2018.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rigatonismom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 12 2012 at 4:31pm
pathologic complete response
Nita
DX 09/10 TNBC Stage3c, grade3, Tumor 2.7cm, chemo started 9/29/10, AC x4, Taxol x12, lumpectomy 4/11/11-tumor .6cm, 3+/22 nodes, radiation x 30 finished 6/30/11.Clinical Trial Cisplatin,PARP 8/23/11
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Grateful for today Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 12 2012 at 4:38pm
Nita,

Thanks for posting what a pCR is.

Judy

__________________________________________


cheeks,

Thanks.......pCR really does belong on the abbreviation list.

pCR:      pathologic complete response (to chemo)
              On pathology exam of surgical specimen after neoadjuvant chemo, No cancer cells seen.

cCR:      clinical complete response (to chemo)
              On clinical exam after chemo (and sometimes before chemo ended),
                  no mass felt.
              Unfortunately, a cCR does not always mean one will have a pCR.

Will add to abbreviation list above.   

If anyone would like to explain pCR and cCR differently and add to our knowledge base,
please post.

Grateful for today............Judy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ds21 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 12 2012 at 5:07pm
If you find unknown abbreviations in a paper, look for parenthesized definitions earlier in the paper. E.g. Risk of reccurance (ROR). It is a style convention unique to biomedicine but fairly widely used in medical journals.

David
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mindy555 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 12 2012 at 6:02pm
Thanks so much for this list Judy... VERY helpful! 

There's one thing I've always wondered about which is referenced many times.  One example is when talking about the variable in outcome percentages... such as with the RCB calculator. (though not stated there I don't believe).  Often you hear "size of tumor at diagnoses" and its implications. 

Should that not be "at time of treatment" ??? 

Because of TN's high-grade aggressive nature, many of our tumors grow (sometimes significantly) in size from first discovery to when we (finally) receive treatment.

Anyone know?

Thanks again, Judy!  xxxx

ETA (edited to add) I just realized this is OT (off topic) for this thread.  Sorry ladies and gents.


Edited by mindy555 - Feb 12 2012 at 6:13pm
Dx July 2011 56 yo
Stage I IDC,TN,Grade 3
Grew to Stage IIa- No ev of node involve- BRCA1+ chondroid metaplasia
Daughter also BRCA1+
Mass grew on Taxol
FEC 6x better
BMX 3/19/12 pCR NED
BSO 6/2012
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lee21 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 12 2012 at 6:12pm
Pathological tumor size (size at time of surgery) is the gold standard. In the neoadjuvant setting, tumor size will be determined pre-treatment by radiographic methods (mammography/ultrasound/MRI).
The difference in size at time of discovery compared to size determined at time of surgery or by radiographic measurements is more likely due to the method of measurement (palpation being the least accurate), rather than the proliferative rate of the tumor, assuming that the time lapse is on the order of a month or two.
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mindy555 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 12 2012 at 6:21pm
Thanks, Lee.

I had to read this a couple of times to fully understand what you're saying.  I think I grasp it.  My local onc has stated adjuvant/surgery is the gold standard, as you're saying.

As a neoadjuvant patient my pathology (by 4 core tissue samples and MRI) came back as 1.8 cm.  At time of treatment by ultrasound it was almost 3 cm, which changed the stage.  Kind of splitting hairs in my case.  Although I've read of much more dramatic increase in size from diagnoses to treatment within a fairly short window of time.

I guess I'm still a little confused.  I've always "assumed" what is meant is size at treatment, vs. diagnoses since stages do/can change.

*sigh* talk about feeling dim.


Edited by mindy555 - Feb 12 2012 at 6:47pm
Dx July 2011 56 yo
Stage I IDC,TN,Grade 3
Grew to Stage IIa- No ev of node involve- BRCA1+ chondroid metaplasia
Daughter also BRCA1+
Mass grew on Taxol
FEC 6x better
BMX 3/19/12 pCR NED
BSO 6/2012
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lee21 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 12 2012 at 7:43pm
That's interesting.  MRI is supposed to be the most accurate of the radiographic modalities (relative to pathological size).  In my case, my initial ultrasound on 12-1 showed a 1.7cm tumor and MRI on 12-30 said it was 3cm.  Most likely, it is because the radiologist didn't get the plane of the tumor right for determining the maximum diameter. MRI could have over-estimated things a bit -- but when it does, studies have shown that the non-tumor part is pathological also (lymphovascular invasion, inflammation etc).

BTW, tumor size is determined (by convention) to be the longest diameter.  Some have argued that it makes more sense to use tumor volume, rather than maximum diameter, in staging.
For example, a tumor that is 1.8x1.8x1.8cm would have a volume of 5.8cc and by current convention be a T1 tumor.  A tumor that is 2.5 x 2 x 1cm would have a volume of 5cc but by convention would be a T2 tumor.

Seeing that the current TNM staging system doesn't take into account tumor grade and receptor status, it is far from ideal in determining prognosis.

Not sure what you mean by "at time of treatment" -- presumably you are referring to the time between diagnosis and treatment.  Within a reasonable time frame, I still think size discrepancy is more likely to be due to technical reasons than the tumor doubling time.
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lee21 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 12 2012 at 8:21pm
Mindy, one more thing - in the neoadjuvant setting, your most important prognostic piece of data will be your response to treatment (in-breast and axillary lymph nodes). If you achieve pCR, then it becomes almost irrelevant whether you are stage I or IIA pre-treatment.
I'm not really sure about your situation: generally US tends to overestimate for smaller (<2 cm) and underestimates for larger tumors. I guess if you had serial MRIs and your tumor grew from 1.8 to 3cm I would be inclined to believe it is rapid growth.  Otherwise there are the technical issues.

Judy-- sorry for hijacking this thread.

Lee
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mindy555 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 12 2012 at 9:34pm
By "at time of treatment" I mean the reading (even considering many variables) received closest to treatment.. which naturally can be skewed by technical factors. I see and concur with a couple of points you mention in our current grading system.

In my case my initial MRI was 'spot on' in size w/ a following ultrasound ordered immediately after due to a questionable  DCIS in left breast.   The 1.8 tumor was in my right.  While the bilateral ultrasound "appeared" to rule out problems in the left, my SO wants a SLB on the left side due to the initial MRI.

Yes, staging is based on the maximum measurement. I'm one who happens to think it makes more sense to take into account total tumor volume.  We know in a neoadjuvant setting with other prognostic factors it plays a significant role in diagnosing RTB after surgery.  With that said,  I understand many state their MOs find the RTB calculator as a prognostic tool having little to no true clinical use.

So, ultimately.. though my own experience I see technical variables will inevitably create differences in readings throughout neo treatment-  for a variety of reasons.    Many you already mentioned.  I've experienced this time and time again throughout my own treatment both at home and at MDA.
The exception in my case was undeniable, significant growth measurements while on Taxol.

Thanks, Lee.

Dx July 2011 56 yo
Stage I IDC,TN,Grade 3
Grew to Stage IIa- No ev of node involve- BRCA1+ chondroid metaplasia
Daughter also BRCA1+
Mass grew on Taxol
FEC 6x better
BMX 3/19/12 pCR NED
BSO 6/2012
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lee21 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 14 2012 at 7:04am
Mindy
I'm glad you are doing better on your current regimen. How many cycles of taxol did you go through before pulling the plug? I remember reading somewhere that BRCA1 mutation carriers may not respond well to Taxol but I'll have to dig those studies up.
Lee
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lee21 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 14 2012 at 10:10am
Mindy I found what I was thinking - under OPEN ACCESS go to the paper by Minami and Chang - on pg 182 second column, last paragraph there is a discussion about BRCA 1 mutation carriers being relatively more anthracycline- sensitive and taxane - resistant. Several references are also cited.
lee
12/9/11 @59,IDC,grade3, TNBC,3cm(MRI),SLNB0,stage IIA, BRCA1 variant
1/30/12 DD AC-T, 6/7/12 Lumpectomy, ypT1b(0.8 cm), 7/9/12 Rads x 30
11/9/12, clinical trial cisplatin/rucaparib, cisplatin-only arm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mindy555 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 14 2012 at 1:38pm
Hi Lee,

I completed 3 weekly doses of Taxol w/ a 41% growth.  After my first round of FEC the mass shrunk 90% and it's been slow go since.  Thanks for posting info for the BRCA 1+ discussion.  Hope you're doing well.

Warm thoughts,

Mindy


Edited by mindy555 - Feb 14 2012 at 1:39pm
Dx July 2011 56 yo
Stage I IDC,TN,Grade 3
Grew to Stage IIa- No ev of node involve- BRCA1+ chondroid metaplasia
Daughter also BRCA1+
Mass grew on Taxol
FEC 6x better
BMX 3/19/12 pCR NED
BSO 6/2012
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote debB Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 24 2012 at 7:47am
Bump
Dx 4/29/11, 46 yrs old, 3.9 cm tumor, Stg 2 Grade 3 chemo 4 rounds DD AC, 12 weekly taxol, finish. Lumpectomy, 2mm residual tumor. 37 rounds rads completed. Cisplatin/PARP trial
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Grateful for today Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 24 2012 at 11:41am
Hi Laura,

Thanks for asking about abbreviations.
Will add the ones you are asking about to the above master list in the first post.
      DX:        diagnosis
      Rads:    radiation
      
     NED        No Evidence of Disease          (already on list)
Will have to ask other members what   "IDS" is for. Maybe the person who posted "IDS" could
       post answer and I'll add to list.      IBS and IDC are on the above list.

Please continue to ask to have abbreviations added to list as you find ones that are not on the list.
Think members new to the site can find the abbreviations that need to be added to the list
more quickly than older members who may gotten used to the abbreviations on the forums.

If one posts on this site:   what does   "________" mean, someone will see it and answer.
Then eventually, it will be added to above master list.
What do you do when you cannot find this abbreviations thread........ got to "Search" option at
      options choice at top of forums,   put in "abbreviations" and the abbreveiaitons on forums
      thread will be brought up.     (from page    TNBC Forums)
Note that the abbreviations for many chemo drugs are given at the bottom of the list.

Another abbreviations tip (courtesy of ds21/David):
       If you find unknown abbreviations in a paper, look for parenthesized definitions earlier
       in the paper. E.g. Risk of reccurance (ROR). It is a style convention unique to biomedicine
       but fairly widely used in medical journals.   
       

Sorry you have reason to come to this site. But ....Welcome to the site.

With caring and positive thoughts,

Grateful for today..............Judy

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi to all members,

Need help on what   "IDS"   stands for in relation to the forums?
Just post the answer, I'll then add to above master list.

Thanks in advance.

With caring and positive thoughts to all,

Grateful for today...........Judy





Edited by Grateful for today - Feb 24 2012 at 1:04pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Grateful for today Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 28 2012 at 11:32pm
Hi,

A member has asked what "IDS" stands for.
Need help on what   "IDS"   stands for in relation to the forums?
Just post the answer, I'll then add to above master list.
(We have IBC and IDC already on list.)

Thanks in advance.

With caring and positive thoughts to all,

Grateful for today...........Judy
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Joined: Sep 21 2011
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Grateful for today Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 06 2012 at 2:05pm
Hi,

Wanted to let some of the newer members know of this " abbreviations" thread.
One needs to go to the very first post to see the list of some of the abbreviations
          used on the forums. There is also the abbreviations of some of the chemo meds.

Please continue to ask to have abbreviations added to list as you find ones that are not on the list.
If you find an abbreviation you are not familiar with, post on this site, something like
           What does   "________" mean, someone will see it and answer.
Then eventually, it will be added to above master list.

Still looking for what "IDS" stands for.
Maybe the "IDS" was a typo for IBC or IDC which are on the list????

With caring and positive thoughts,

Grateful for today..................Judy


PS: One might like to know of the thread: Breast Cancer Dictionary
               http://forum.tnbcfoundation.org/topic2618.html
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